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Dan Hurley lands first commitment as UConn head coach

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First-year UConn head coach Dan Hurley landed his first commitment in the Class of 2019 on Tuesday, as four-star guard James Bouknight announced that he will play his college ball for the Huskies.

A native of New York that has played in the prep ranks for the MacDuffie School and has been a member of the same PSA Cardinals AAU program that produced Cole Anthony and Mo Bamba, Bouknight is a 6-foot-4 off-guard that still has quite a bit of potential to grow into. He’s an athletic scorer with upside, exactly the kind of player that UConn is going to need in a year where they will be losing Jalen Adams while Alterique Gilbert continues to struggle with shoulder issues.

Much is expected from Hurley at UConn, and he has found himself in the mix for a number of high-profile recruits in and around the Northeast. Putting together a couple of strong classes at the start of his tenure is critical for a coach looking to bring the Huskies back to the heights they were at under Jim Calhoun.

And Bouknight is a terrific was to start that process.

Kevin Ollie demands UConn retraction, plans to sue university

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UConn’s ugly breakup with Kevin Ollie took another twist this week as Ollie and his attorneys sent a letter to school president Susan Herbst demanding that the school issue a retraction regarding damaging documents that were released last week while threatening to sue the university for defamation and invasion of privacy.

That letter was in response to documents that were released to local papers as the result of a Freedom of Information Act request. Those documents included UConn’s internal investigation into violations that were committed by Ollie during his UConn tenure, and those violations — which included Ollie shooting around with a recruit during an official visit and trips that were paid for for players on his roster to fly to Atlanta to workout with a trainer — were used as justification to fire Ollie with cause.

And that is the root of the issue here.

Ollie was fired by UConn with cause, meaning that he did not receive the $10.5 million that he was owed for the final three years of his contract.

Also mentioned in the documents were two more alarming allegations: That Ollie had ensured a recruit’s mother was paid $30,000 to be able to move closer to campus, and that he had fired his agent after the agent refused to help pay to funnel players to UConn.

“UConn released the documents in direct response to a Freedom of Information request by Mr. Ollie’s own attorneys,” the school said in a statement released to ESPN. “Other parties, including the media, also requested and received these same documents as required by Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) in Connecticut. The FOIA, which governs public agencies such as the University, does not permit the selective release of public records to certain parties while denying those same records to others.”

Former UConn assistant levies serious accusations at Kevin Ollie

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On Thursday, after a Freedom Of Information Act request filed by local newspapers, UConn released more than 1,000 pages of documents pertaining to the investigation that led to the decision to fire of Kevin Ollie.

In those documents were the fairly innocuous NCAA violations that were allegedly committed by Ollie that UConn used as “just cause” for firing him and digging themselves out of the $10 million that he was owed on that contract.

But that is just the beginning of where this thing gets interesting, because there are more accusations levied at Ollie than what UConn was able to confirm.

Let’s start with this one: Former assistant coach Glen Miller said that Ollie paid $30,000 to the mother of a recruit to allow her to afford an apartment and move to Connecticut to be closer to her son. He didn’t have any first-hand information — his wife had befriended the mother of the player and opened up about it while they were on a road trip together — but that’s not the only bomb that Miller tried to drop. He also alleged that Ollie fired his former agent because he wouldn’t help him to recruit, which Miller implies is the agent paying players to go to UConn.

Again, none of these allegations are corroborated. This is Miller, a long-time UConn assistant that was fired — and is clearly still bitter about it — passing along things that he had heard second-hand. One story was from his wife, the other was from one of the most powerful agents in the business. There’s no proof those conversations actually happened, let alone that what was discussed is actually true.

But this is a good example of just how ugly this thing has a chance to get.

There is $10 million on the line for a school and a state that is not exactly overflowing in cash, but is there a larger cost that could be associated with this decision? Could fighting to save that $10 million eventually turn up major violations within the UConn program?

As it stands, Ollie has not technically been fired by UConn yet. He is only suspended with pay as of now. The process to fire him included a hearing with athletic director David Benedict in April and a hearing with school president Susan Herbst last month. Both Benedict and, as of yesterday, Herbst supported the decision to fire Ollie with cause, meaning that he will now be forced to face arbitration. If that ruling goes against him, he will have the option to take UConn to court, which, it seems, he will be willing to do.

Which is where the headache for UConn comes into play.

Do they really want to have a case that has already had these accusations come to light get discussed in a court of law? If this is what a FOIA turns up, what happens during depositions? For a program that has already dealt with their share of NCAA scandals — which, mind you, did not get Jim Calhoun fired — is it really worth the money to risk having even more turn up?

The worst kept secret in college basketball is that UConn is grasping at straws with this decision. They want anything they can find that will allow them to get out from underneath what, in hindsight, was a terrible contract.

And in the end, that could cost them more than just money.

Report: Alleged NCAA violations against former UConn coach Kevin Ollie revealed

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Fired former UConn head coach Kevin Ollie allegedly committed multiple NCAA violations that led to his dismissal last spring, according to a report released Wednesday by the Hartford Courant.

Ollie was dismissed from the position after a disappointing 2017-18 campaign as he’s been in a battle with the school over the remaining $10 million on his contract. Since Ollie was fired for just cause, the school is trying to withhold that remaining money as the case will proceed to arbitration. UConn president Susan Herbst upheld the school’s decision to terminate Ollie for just cause on Tuesday as he is still, technically, suspended without pay.

According to documents obtained by The Courant under a Freedom of Information Act request, Ollie and his staff committed multiple violations, including an impermissible phone call between Huskies legend Ray Allen and a recruit. Multiple UConn players were also sent to work with an outside trainer on campus, and later, in Atlanta. Another violation occurred when Ollie shot baskets with recruit James Akinjo during an official visit as the video was posted by Akinjo’s guardian on Twitter. The video was later deleted.

Among the 1,355 pages of documents that The Courant obtained, it includes the NCAA’s transcripts from their investigation as well as UConn’s case to terminate Ollie as head coach.

Perhaps the worst violation includes the alleged involvement of the trainer, as Ollie allegedly had a friendship with Derrek Hamilton. During the 2015-16 season, Hamilton allegedly worked out UConn players after hours during on-campus workouts as well as off-campus workouts. Three players also allegedly traveled to Atlanta to train with Hamilton as the players were fed, transported and housed for free — all of which are NCAA violations.

The NCAA has yet to proceed with any action against UConn as 900 pages of the report were based on the NCAA’s interviews and findings. Former UConn coach Glen Miller was also granted immunity in exchange for his testimony to the NCAA regarding the violations.

These alleged violations are a new step in the Ollie case, as the case does not look great for him to receive the remaining $10 million on the contract. Ollie and UConn still have to go through arbitration, but the release of these documents, and alleged violations, is very hurtful to Ollie’s case.

2K Classic field, featuring Cuse vs. UConn, will be fun

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The schedule for the 2018 2K Classic has been released, and you have to credit the organizers because, once again, they found a way to get this right.

Let’s start with the obvious: Syracuse and UConn will be facing off for the fourth straight season. And for the third season in a row, that game will be played in New York City. I shouldn’t have to explain this, but for those that don’t know, UConn and Syracuse fans both have a massive presence in New York City and since the dawn of time — or at least the dawn of the Big East — they have fought amongst each other for the title of New York City’s college basketball team.

Typically, that war was waged during the Big East tournament. These days, the battlefield is Madison Square Garden for a non-conference game before winter officially starts. Either way, that game is always one of the best and most entertaining non-conference atmospheres, and this year should be no different, as UConn will have a new coach digging the program out of a whole and Syracuse, with Tyus Battle back, looks like a top 25 team.

On the other side of the bracket, Oregon has the talent on their roster to be a top 15 team while Iowa brings enough back to be sneaky-relevant in the Big Ten. Cuse-UConn with a Cuse-Oregon title game is pretty good for a preseason tournament of this nature.

Calhoun says he expects to coach DIII Saint Joseph

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WEST HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Noreaga Davis acknowledges being a little star struck when Hall of Fame coach Jim Calhoun came to see him play high school basketball.

The 6-foot-3 very small forward from Notre Dame-Fairfield in Connecticut, is one of about a dozen players Calhoun has recruited as he helps build a new basketball program for the tiny University of Saint Joseph, a Division III school located in suburban Hartford.

The former all-women’s school just began admitting men and begins playing men’s basketball in November.

“This was my first time meeting like a real legendary coach,” Davis said. “A few minutes after, I had to take a minute and be like, ‘Wow I just met Jim Calhoun.”

The Hall of Famer said Wednesday that he wants to become the first men’s coach at the Catholic university, which has a total enrollment of about 2,400 students and a gym that seats about 1,200 people.

Since taking on the job as program architect last September, Calhoun said he’s enjoyed getting back into the game, going to dozens of gyms and watching high school and prep school games while competing in recruiting circles, even at the DIII level. He’s also been working to secure funding for new basketball facilities at Saint Joseph.

“It’s an exciting time for me,” he said. “I really like it.”

The 76-year-old is in the final month of a 10-month consulting contract at Saint Joseph, but also recently signed a new contract to continue as an adviser at UConn, where he retired as coach in 2012 after 26 seasons and three national titles. During his 40-year coaching career at Connecticut and Northeastern, Calhoun amassed 873 wins.

Calhoun says he wants to continue advising new UConn coach Dan Hurley and help in whatever way he can to rebuild the Huskies program. But, he acknowledges there are some contractual and logistical issues to work out if he is to do both jobs. He expects to have those resolved in the next month.

“I fully expect to coach Saint Joe’s next year,” he said. “I fully expect to and then we’ll leave it at that.”

Should Calhoun end up as coach, Saint Joseph may become the highest profile DIII program in the country. Calhoun says the school is in talks with networks such as ESPN and Netflix about doing a documentary series on his return. Bigger programs, including Providence, have talked to him about possible exhibition games, he said.

Calhoun has brought in his former UConn assistant, Glenn Miller, to help him at Saint Joseph. Miller also is a former head coach at Penn and Brown. He is expected to be named head coach at Saint Joseph if Calhoun is not.

Davis said he and the other recruits understand the situation and are comfortable with it.

“I know that either way (Calhoun) will remain a big part of the basketball program,” he said. “I’m just excited about that. We will have a chance to do something special. My goal is to win the Division III national championship.”