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Tuesday’s Things to Know: Duke’s Destruction Tour resumes against Indiana, Louisville knocks off No. 9 Michigan State and No. 13 Virginia Tech goes down

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The Big Ten/ACC Challenge rolled on Tuesday night, delivering a couple upsets, a dominant performance and few really entertaining contests. Here’s everything you need to know to catch up on the night’s action.

DUKE CONTINUES DESTRUCTION TOUR BY THROTTLING INDIANA

The undefeated dream is dead, but Duke’s inevitable tear through the winter continued Tuesday with an absolute 90-69 thrashing of Indiana at Cameron Indoor.

Indiana got a dose of what only Gonzaga could handle and other teams are sure to be infected with as the season moves along as the Hoosiers simply had no answer for an overwhelming Blue Devils teams. The talent, athleticism and uncanny cohesion for a group so young so early is just going to be too much for just about everybody in the ACC. Duke shot 52.4 percent from the floor, bottled up Indiana defensively and were just all-around dominant. The Hoosiers had no chance. 

Zion WIlliamson had 25 points, six rebounds, four assists and his customary OH MY GOODNESS dunk of the night. R.J. Barrett scored 22 and had nine rebounds while Cam Reddish had 13 points and Tre Jones (who sort of quietly is becoming the engine of this team) put up a cool 15/5/8 without a turnover in 32 minutes. There’s just no way for almost any team to compete with those four. The fact they’ve got Marques Bolden, Jack White and Javin DeLaurier for Coach K to mix and match with, that’s just unfair.

They might get beat again this year, but don’t let these beatdowns, which are sure to be often, let you lose sight of what an entertaining and special group they’ve got in Durham.

 

LOUISVILLE FELLS NO. 9 MICHIGAN STATE

It had been a bit of a difficult week or so for Louisville. The Cardinals lost to a top-10 Tennessee team and then fell in overtime to Marquette, both at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. While the trio of wins to open the season were nice, Chris Mack didn’t come to Louisville to beat Nicholls State, Southern and Vermont.

Things got considerably more sweet Tuesday.

Louisville outplays No. 9 Michigan State for large swaths of action, and then outlasted the Spartans in overtime, 82-78, at the KFC Yum! Center. The Spartans were a little short handed, sure, and their most-important player struggled, yeah, but it was the first signature win of the Mack era, a top-10 victory at home.

 

PENN STATE GETS NO. 13 VIRGINIA TECH

It had been 20 years since Penn State won a non-conference game at home against a ranked opponent, but Myreon Jones’ 18 points helped put an end to that streak.

The Nittany Lions nipped the 13th-ranked Hokies, 63-62, to claim their first win against a Power 5 opponent this season. Virginia Tech shot 10 of 19 from 3-point range and forced 16 Penn State turnovers, but it wasn’t enough.

 

NO. 14 IOWA AND NO. 22 WISCONSIN SURVIVE

Both the Hawkeyes and Badgers welcomed unranked teams to their home arenas as part of the Big Ten/ACC Challenge, and both had to sweat out wins down the stretch. Iowa beat Pitt, 69-68, and Wisconsin defeated NC State, 79-75.

Iowa got 18 points and 11 rebounds from freshman Joe Wieskamp while Jordan Bohannon had 12 points and six steals. Xavier Johnson scored 18 for the Panthers, who committed 17 turnovers.

Ethan Happ continued his strong play to start the season, going for 19 points, 11 rebounds and three assists, while D’Mitrik Trice had 18 points and six assists. Brad Davison, well, he drew five charges.

 

Jones leads Penn State to win over No. 13 Virginia Tech

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STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) — Pat Chambers predicted two weeks ago that opponents would soon come to respect Myreon Jones’ sharpshooting abilities.

When the Penn State freshman finally got his chance to showcase his shot against a ranked team on Tuesday night, he lived up to his coach’s billing.

Jones scored 13 of his 18 points in the second half to lead Penn State to a 63-62 upset win over No. 13 Virginia Tech on Tuesday. Jones played 22 minutes and finished the game 7-for-11 and was 4-for-8 from 3-point range.

“I told you guys,” Chambers said. “This kid’s nickname is Buckets. I knew it was only matter of time before he’d see the ball go in.”

Lamar Stevens added 14 points and eight rebounds and Rasir Bolton chipped in 11 points for the Nittany Lions (4-2), who snapped Virginia Tech’s five-game winning streak. It was Penn State’s first win over a nonconference Top 25 team at home in 20 years.

Justin Robinson led the Hokies (5-1) with 19 points while Ty Outlaw added 16. Kerry Blackshear Jr. and Nickeil Alexander-Walker scored 14 and 13 points respectively for the Hokies who led 37-35 at halftime.

Virginia Tech coach Buzz Williams was among those unfamiliar with Jones. Williams offered a quiet “no” when he was asked afterward if he thought the young guard would contribute that much with Stevens and a host of other known-shooters on the floor for Penn State.

“I mean that respectfully, too,” Williams said. “I thought they executed their plan very well. We were not great in some things we’ve been great at and that’s a credit to them.”

The Hokies, playing for the first time on the road this season, used a 9-0 run midway through the second half that gave them a 50-44 lead. But Jones led the Nittany Lions back to a 56-55 advantage with 10 points over the next five minutes.

Bolton hit his third 3-pointer of the game to give Penn State the lead for good, 61-58 lead with 3:57 to play.

Blackshear and Josh Reaves traded baskets over the next 40 seconds and those were the final baskets of the game as Penn State went scoreless over the final 3:16.

Robinson made two free throws with 1:24 left to get Virginia Tech within one, but the Hokies missed three shots and had a turnover in the final 90 seconds.

Virginia Tech led 21-13 midway through the first half after four-straight 3-pointers from Outlaw preceded a pair free throws from Blackshear Jr.

But Stevens made a layup through traffic to spark a tying run that included back-to-back 3-pointers from Jamari Wheeler and Bolton 24 seconds apart. Stevens hit another basket moments later to give Penn State a lead it wouldn’t relinquish until Robinson drained back-to-back 3s to give Virginia Tech a 37-35 halftime lead.

BIG MAN’S BACK

With Reaves between free throws just 2:16 into the game, Watkins got up from his courtside seat and slid out of his warmups to hearty cheers. The forward missed the first five games of this season recovering from personal issues. A right knee injury cost him the final nine games last season.

“He changes their team,” Williams said.

Chambers announced Monday that Watkins would be a game-time decision and the big man appeared to be working his way back into shape. He played 21 minutes, made one basket and grabbed seven rebounds.

SLOW ROBINSON

Penn State’s defensive strategy was simple enough and it helped the Nittany Lions play what Chambers called their best second half of defense in his 10-year tenure.

The Nittany Lions forced nine second-half turnovers and held the Hokies to just 10-for-26 shooting over the final 20 minutes.

“Everything was about Robinson for me,” Chambers said. “Another cliché, we wanted to cut the head off.”

THE TAKEAWAY

Virginia Tech: Sitting at their highest ranking in the AP Top 25 since the 1995-96 season, the Hokies have plenty of offensive talent and have played well enough on defense to indicate they should be able to climb higher.

Penn State: Getting Watkins back should be a boost for a team that got 20-plus plus points in six-straight games from Stevens before Tuesday to go with a bunch of complimentary scoring from freshmen Myles Dread and Bolton. With No. 24 Maryland next, the Nittany Lions will have a shot to post back-to-back wins over ranked teams for the first time since 2011. … The Nittany Lions beat then-No. 10 Temple in 1998 at home.

2018-2019 Big Ten Conference Preview: Is this Michigan State’s league again?

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Beginning in September and running up until November 6th, the first day of the season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2018-2019 NBCSports.com college hoops preview package.

Today, we are previewing the Big Ten.


Nothing about this season’s Big Ten is certain. With only two preseason NBC Sports top 25 teams, and a number of last season’s tournament teams losing significant pieces, the Big Ten will have a lot of question marks for this season.

When you also factor in the conference’s intriguing recruiting classes, and a new 20-game conference schedule, and the league could see so many different varieties of outcomes this season.

Of course, the Big Ten is still seeking its first national title since 2000 as the league came close with Michigan in last season’s title game. Will any of this season’s teams make a surprise run in March? Or will the league beat itself up without a clear title favorite heading into March?

FIVE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW

1. Michigan State lost two first-rounders but they have talent and experience to be preseason favorite.

It’s pretty much impossible for Michigan State to match the talent level of last season’s team. Forward Miles Bridges and big man Jaren Jackson Jr. were both first-round picks. This year’s Spartans don’t have many NBA draft prospects currently getting mock draft buzz. But Michigan State does return a solid core of experience.

The junior class of guards Cassius Winston, Joshua Langford and big man Nick Ward can all put up points and make plays. Seniors like Matt McQuaid and Kenny Goins can fill rotation roles. And Tom Izzo recruited a very solid five-man recruiting class that is composed of all four-star prospects. That group, led by some intriguing athletes in Aaron Henry and Gabe Brown, and a potential backup lead guard in Foster Loyer, might need to step up in order for Michigan State to maximize its potential. It feels weird to say that Michigan State is the league’s favorite when they have so many glaring issues.

Who is the team’s go-to player? Can the juniors turn into all-league players? Does the freshmen class step up? This team isn’t the most talented Izzo has produced, but they have enough experience and intriguing weapons to be win another league title.

(Rey Del Rio/Getty Images)

2. Michigan (also) lost plenty from its title-game team. They’re (also) still a major factor.

Coming off of a national title game loss to Villanova, the Wolverine have to replace the shooting and scoring prowess of Moritz Wagner, Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman and Duncan Robinson. At least Charles Matthews is back. The two-way guard has never thrived as a go-to scorer. But Matthews scored a strong ability to get buckets during a very good NCAA tournament run.

A defensive-minded Michigan team needs more help on offense from there. Point guard Zavier Simpson is known more for locking up opponents than his scoring while sophomores like Isaiah Livers and Jordan Poole didn’t play extended minutes very often last season. Big man Jon Teske is a solid junior with size, but he’s more known for being a big body in the paint who can rebound and defend. Michigan might need to rely on the talent of an enticing freshman class that includes multiple potential contributors.

Forwards Ignas Brazdeikis and Brandon Johns Jr. are both skilled offensive threats while big man Colin Castleton should provide interior depth as a backup center. Like some other Michigan teams of the past few years, this might be a team that starts more slowly and plays its best ball in March.

3. Indiana vs. Purdue is a rivalry to watch once again (between two likely tournament teams)

Now that Indiana has reeled in a top-ten recruiting class and Purdue is coming off of back-to-back Sweet 16 appearances, this is looking like the year their rivalry ramps up again. And, thankfully, the Big Ten’s new 20-game conference schedule means protected in-state matchups with home-and-home series. Because both of these teams could be fun NCAA tournament groups.

The Hoosiers have plenty of depth in Archie Miller’s second season as forward Juwan Morgan is back and freshman shooting guard Romeo Langford is the state’s most heralded recruit in years. We know Indiana will likely be able to defend. Getting consistent point guard play and consistent scoring help for Morgan and Langford could be key. But Miller’s already flipped most of the roster with long and versatile athletes. This Indiana team could be really good.

Purdue loses a lot of proven seniors. The great news is the return of high-scoring guard Carsen Edwards. The 6-foot-1 Edwards is a walking bucket getter. He can shoot from all over the floor. Edwards might lead college basketball in scoring this season. The Boilermakers’ season will ultimately hinge on how they replace the four other senior starters from last season. Sophomore big man Matt Haarms and guard Nojel Eastern should command larger roles while senior Ryan Cline has to be more than a shooting specialist. And the addition of junior grad transfer Evan Boudreaux was a huge coup on the transfer market.

This should be the first time in a few years that this rivalry felt so fun. Indiana should be right back in the thick of the Big Ten mix while Purdue remains one of the conference’s steadiest programs.

Carsen Edwards (Elsa/Getty Images)

4. Nebraska is talented enough to make the NCAA tournament after just falling short last season.

Last season Nebraska won 22 games and finished tied for fourth in the Big Ten as they still missed the NCAA tournament. The good news is that four of those main pieces all return to form an experienced upperclass core that should be really talented. Seniors James Palmer Jr., Isaac Copeland and Glynn Watson have a ton of experience between them as they are all proven players. Junior Isaiah Roby might be a sleeper breakout player as he showed flashes of bigger things last season.

It’s the rest of the Huskers that have to prove themselves. Atrocious on the defensive glass last season, Nebraska doesn’t have returning size with much game experience and the bench is also pretty unproven. Sophomore Thomas Allen has a chance to be a solid contributor. Overall, Nebraska returns over 75 percent of last season’s scoring and rebounding. But how will this team will in the other parts? That will ultimately dictate if Nebraska is a Big Ten contender, or a team on the outside of the NCAA tournament yet again.

5. The Big Ten moves to a 20-game conference schedule.

The Big Ten gets an interesting wrinkle this season with the addition of two more conference games. The first league to go to 20 conference games in a season, the move could give the Big Ten more chances at quality wins along with a better overall profile of scheduled games. It could also mean the conference becomes a brutal gauntlet where it becomes increasingly difficult to stay atop the college basketball food chain.

With each team in the league adding at least one additional conference road game, it makes for seven head-to-head matchups and six individual matchups. In-state matchups are also protected with home-and-home guarantees, so we won’t see any more seasons where Michigan and Michigan State only play once. Already a difficult league to win, the Big Ten is going to be brutal to win this season, and it’ll be fascinating to see how the 20-game conference schedule plays out before the conference tournament even begins.

Ethan Happ (Stacy Revere/Getty Images)

PRESEASON BIG TEN PLAYER OF THE YEAR: CARSEN EDWARDS, Purdue

Already an All-American on some lists last season, Edwards could be a sleeper Player of the Year candidate now that he lost four senior starters around him. One of the most fun-to-watch players in the country, the 6-foot-1 Edwards is fearless with the ball in his hands. Capable of taking over a game offensively, Edwards has also improved his efficiency and his ability to get others involved. He’ll need to make teammates better this season if Purdue is to attempt to make a third consecutive Sweet 16 appearance.

THE REST OF THE BIG TEN FIRST TEAM

  • ETHAN HAPP, Wisconsin: A three-year starter and All-American candidate who quietly put up 17.9 points, 8.0 rebounds and 3.7 assists per game last year, Happ is one of the most productive and experienced returning players in the country.
  • CHARLES MATTHEWS, Michigan: Outstanding during the tournament, the junior wing is a dynamic two-way wing. Can he be turned to as more of a go-to scorer? If Matthews is more consistent on offense he could be an All-American.
  • NICK WARD, Michigan State: The Big Ten’s leader in field goal percentage last season (64.8 percent), Ward put up big numbers despite only playing 18.9 minutes per game. With increased conditioning, Ward could put up huge numbers.
  • JORDAN MURPHY, Minnesota: The national leader in double-doubles last season with 24, Murphy was the bright spot of a bad Minnesota season. If Murphy improves his 31 percent three-point shooting then he could be a lethal scorer.

FIVE MORE NAMES TO KNOW

  • ROMEO LANGFORD, Indiana
  • JAMES PALMER JR, Nebraska
  • CASSIUS WINSTON, Michigan State
  • ANTHONY COWAN JR., Maryland
  • JUWAN MORGAN, Indiana

BREAKOUT STAR

Penn State junior forward Lamar Stevens has taken a backseat to Tony Carr since the two were teammates in high school. With Carr leaving the Nittany Lions for the pros, the 6-foot-8 Stevens could be in line for a huge season. As a sophomore, Stevens already put up solid numbers of 15.5 points and 5.9 rebounds per game while shooting 46 percent from the field. Stevens has never been the go-to guy with Carr playing alongside him.

But Stevens also showed flashes of bigger things at the end of last season. Winning Most Outstanding Player honors during Penn State’s NIT title run, Stevens had games of 30 points against Marquette and 28 points in the title game against Utah during the tournament. If he can handle the season-long pressure of being the featured player, Stevens could have a huge year.

COACH UNDER PRESSURE

It has been an up-and-down few seasons for Minnesota and head coach Richard Pitino. The Golden Gophers made a surprising NCAA tournament appearance in 2017, which was followed by last season’s dud of a 4-14 record in Big Ten play. Despite producing an underrated amount of in-state talent, Minnesota only has five NCAA tournament appearance during Pitino’s five seasons as he’s only 31-59 in Big Ten play.

ON SELECTION SUNDAY WE’LL BE SAYING …

The Big Ten has a deep profile of teams who are in the Field of 68, but it’s tough to tell if any of them are major contenders. The league’s expanded schedule made for a tougher season, and more losses. But Big Ten teams that get hot in the conference tournament have also exceeded expectations in recent years. Don’t sleep on a team from the Big Ten getting hot.

I’M MOST EXCITED ABOUT …

Seeing what happens during Archie Miller’s second season at Indiana. The addition of Romeo Langford adds a ton of excitement to the Hoosiers since he’s the type of talent who can take over a game while making it look easy. Miller usually gets the most out of his teams, and this year, Indiana has the talent and depth to be a team that is really fun to watch.

FIVE NON-CONFERENCE GAMES TO CIRCLE ON YOUR CALENDAR

  • Nov. 6, Michigan State vs. Kansas (Champions Classic, Indianapolis)
  • Nov. 14, Michigan at Villanova (Gavitt Games)
  • Nov. 22, Michigan State vs. UCLA (in Las Vegas)
  • Nov. 28, Purdue at Florida State (ACC/Big Ten Challenge)
  • Nov. 28, North Carolina at Michigan (ACC/Big Ten Challenge)
Tim Miles (Dylan Buell/Getty Images)

PREDICTED FINISH

1. MICHIGAN STATE: With a stable of three solid core juniors, senior role players, and an athletic and talented five-man freshman class, the Spartans have all of the necessary pieces to win another Big Ten title. Point guard Cassius Winston and shooting guard Joshua Langford are much better than many of the league’s backcourts while big man Nick Ward could put up huge numbers with an increase in minutes. Depth on this team shouldn’t be too much of a concern as long as the freshmen can help. The Spartans don’t have the look of a national title contender, but they’re also dangerous enough where it would be dumb to count them out of making a run in March. It all depends on who steps up and is ready to take big shots this season after two seasons of exits in the Round of 32.

2. MICHIGAN: Michigan has transformed into a defensive team these past two seasons as they’ll need to get stops and manufacture points at times this season. While many of John Beilein’s teams have been very good with perimeter shooting, this Wolverines team might struggle. Many of the returning players were sub-35 percent and inconsistent. Others, like freshmen Ignas Brazdeikis and Brandon Johns are unproven at the college level. If Charles Matthews, Zavier Simpson, Isaiah Livers and Jordan Poole can all even shoot a little bit better than Michigan’s offense should have enough to carry their potentially dangerous defense.

3. INDIANA: Archie Miller’s second season should have a ton of intrigue as the Hoosiers have huge expectations. Juwan Morgan and Romeo Langford might be the league’s best one-two punch. Indiana also has the benefit of a top-ten recruiting class filled with length, versatility and athleticism. As long as the point guard play of Devonte Green, Al Durham and Robert Phinisee can be consistent, then the Hoosiers should be fine. Interior play could be another thing to watch as that group has to remain healthy. The biggest takeaway is that Indiana’s defense has the potential to be very good, as Miller has many different weapons at his disposal to throw at opponents. All of the pieces are in place for Indiana to make its first NCAA tournament appearance in three seasons.

4. PURDUE: Better athleticism could make for an interesting subplot for this season. Matt Haarms and Nojel Eastern both have the chance to be plus defenders, while Evan Boudreaux is at least skilled enough and quick enough to run in the open floor. Consistent shooting around Carsen Edwards will be the key for Purdue’s offense. Ryan Cline needs to make shots while Eastern has to improve his inconsistent form. Some of the freshmen like Eric Hunter, and Boudreaux at forward, should also help a bit but they have to prove themselves as being consistent. Making a third straight Sweet 16 might prove to be a bit too tough. But it wouldn’t be surprising to see Purdue have another run to the NCAA tournament.

5. NEBRASKA: The Huskers might be forced to play a lot of small-ball this season and hope that they can rebound better while defending the rim. Isaiah Roby has shown an ability to block shots while Isaac Copeland and James Palmer also have good size. Freshmen like center Brady Heiman and guard Amir Harris could also be asked to play early in the season. But as long as the team’s core four players performs then there is no reason Nebraska shouldn’t be in the NCAA tournament. Palmer is one of the nation’s more underrated scorers while Copeland is experienced and capable. Senior point guard Glynn Watson is a polished floor leader. This team has big aspirations for this season.

6. MARYLAND: Hit hard by players leaving early for the pros, most notably Kevin Huerter and Justin Jackson, the Terps are facing tons of questions. But junior point guard Anthony Cowan Jr. is back and the sophomore group of big man Bruno Fernando and guard Darryl Morsell is very solid. The freshmen class has a five-star forward in Jalen “Stix” Smith and guards Aaron Wiggins and Eric Ayala. If Maryland gets steady production from a few of its freshmen, then they should have the talent to stay with anyone in the league.

7. OHIO STATE: Chris Holtmann worked wonders during his first season with the Buckeyes, taking an undermanned roster and guiding them into the Round of 32. Losing Keita Bates-Diop and Jae’Sean Tate will be tough. The Buckeyes do regroup a bit thanks to some solid freshmen. Senior guard C.J. Jackson and sophomore big man Kaleb Wesson are proven double-figure guys. Grad transfer Keyshawn Woods has gotten ACC buckets. And a freshmen group with Jaedon LeDee, Luther Muhammad and Justin Ahrens provides depth and athleticism. As long as consistent rotation players step up, Ohio State will be an intriguing team.

Romeo Langford (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

8. WISCONSIN: Question marks linger for a Wisconsin team that doesn’t lose anyone from last season. Senior Ethan Happ is one of the nation’s most complete and productive players, while sophomore guard Brad Davison closed the season strong with some eye-opening scoring performances. If the rest of this team can stay healthy then the Badgers could get more pop. D’Mitrik Trice, Kobe King and Brevin Pritzl are all candidates to make a leap while transfer Trevor Anderson adds another rotation guard. If the Badgers can score, they could be competitive for the NCAA tournament.

9. IOWA: The Hawkeyes look like a solid team on paper with four returning double-figure scorers. They also featured the worst defense in the Big Ten and one of the worst in high-major college basketball last season. Big men Tyler Cook and Luka Garza can both put up numbers, but they have to improve as defenders. Jordan Bohannon and Isaiah Moss are capable scorers on the perimeter while top-50 in-state recruit Joe Wieskamp, and Fran McCaffery’s son, Connor McCaffery, should help on the perimeter.

10. MINNESOTA: After freefalling to a 4-14 mark in the Big Ten last season, head coach Richard Pitino could be on the hot seat. Senior forward Jordan Murphy is a double-double machine and a proven player and the Golden Gophers should be healthier this season. Sophomore point guard Isaiah Washington’s ability to replace Nate Mason could be the key to Minnesota’s season. A healthy Amir Coffey could also do wonders for Minnesota’s offense.

11. PENN STATE: Just as the Nittany Lions looked like they were on the verge of a big run, Tony Carr opted to turn pro. Junior forward Lamar Stevens and junior center Mike Watkins return to form one of the more capable and experienced frontcourts in the league. Replacing the backcourt of Carr and senior Shep Garner will be a different story. Senior Josh Reaves is a returning double-figure guy on the perimeter. Outside of him, the defending NIT champs don’t have many proven options.

12. NORTHWESTERN: After a disappointing campaign last season, the Wildcats need to find a new identity following the loss of four-year point guard Bryant McIntosh and shooting guard Scottie Lindsey. Frontcourt experience and length and versatility on the perimeter could be the key for Northwestern’s success. Seniors Derek Pardon and Vic Law return as the duo could be among the conference’s best frontcourt groups. Grad transfer guard Ryan Taylor was a big-time scorer at Evansville last season and Boston College transfer A.J. Turner is an intriguing 6-foot-7 wing. Point guard stability will be key, as reclassified freshmen Ryan Greer might have a lot on his shoulders.

13. ILLINOIS: Only making the tournament in three of the last 11 years, the Fighting Illini figure to be in for another long season. Very young across the board, head coach Brad Underwood has hope. Sophomore Trent Frazier and freshman Ayo Dosunmu form one of the league’s most talented backcourts, but they aren’t battle-tested. The frontcourt is also unproven with 6-foot-6 Kipper Nichols being the most consistent returner there. Developing freshmen and hoping for some unexpected gems are the keys for Illinois this season.

14. RUTGERS: Since joining the Big Ten four seasons ago, Rutgers has never won more than three league games in a season — finishing last in all four years. After losing three of their four top scorers from last season, this season will again be tough. But the sophomore backcourt of Geo Baker and Quinnipiac transfer Peter Kiss has a chance to shine while the Scarlet Knights have an intriguing amount of size and depth in the frontcourt. The talent level is up, but Rutgers is still trying to find its way.

Penn State, West Virginia set up hurricane relief exhibition

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Tuesday afternoon it was announced by Penn State and West Virginia that the two programs will meet in an exhibition that will benefit Hurricane Florence relief efforts. The exhibition will be played November 3 in Morgantown, with all proceeds being donated to the American Red Cross.

While the game won’t impact either team’s record, it is the first meeting between the Nittany Lions and Mountaineers since January 1991. At the time both schools were members of the Atlantic 10, with Penn State leaving to join the Big Ten that summer.

Ahead of the 2017-18 season there were numerous exhibitions matching Division I teams, a move that requires NCAA approval, in the name of charity. That’s certainly the most important aspect of these exhibitions, but it also gives coaches the chance to evaluate their players against similar competition as opposed to the standard preseason game against a Division II, III or NAIA opponent.

Teams also have the option of setting up scrimmages before the season begins, and those affairs cannot be viewed by the general public.

Penn State’s Mike Watkins charged with crime for third time in two years

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Penn State forward Mike Watkins has found himself in trouble with the law for the third time in his career as a Nittany Lion.

On Monday, Watkins, a 6-foot-9 forward that just completed his redshirt sophomore season by averaging 12.9 points and 8.8 boards, was charged with possession of drug paraphenalia. According to a report from the Centre Daily Times, Watkins was found to have a weed grinder as well as three .40 caliber bullets in a team issued gym bag. Police were investigating Watkins for possessing an unregistered gun.

“We are aware of the incident and take this situation seriously,” Penn State Associate Athletic Director Jeff Nelson said. “We hold our student-athletes to high standards and will address this violation of team rules.”

In September of 2016, Watkins was charged with criminal mischief and eventually ordered to pay nearly $3,000 in fines and fees, according to Centre County court records. Last July, Watkins was also charged with disorderly conduct after allegedly getting into a fight, and that led to Watkins being left home from Penn State’s tour of the Bahamas and suspended for the first game of the 2017-18 season for what was termed a disciplinary issue.

The Losers: Which college basketball teams got hurt the most by NBA draft early entries

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The NCAA’s deadline for players that are testing the waters came and went at 11:59 p.m. ET on Wednesday night.

These are the programs that took the biggest hits. 

The biggest winners can be found here. 

THE BIGGEST LOSERS

VILLANOVA

The reigning national champions were hit hard by early departures, as four key contributors made the decision to forego their remaining eligibility. Mikal Bridges and Jalen Brunson moving on came as no surprise, as in addition to their work on the court both graduated in May.

But also moving on were Donte DiVincenzo and Omari Spellman, with the former receiving positive reviews after both his 31-point outing in the national title game and two-day run at the NBA Draft Combine. The latter is seen as an intriguing talent who could go in the first round as well. None of the decisions were shockers, and Villanova did fill some holes with a very good recruiting class, but that’s a lot of lost production to have to account for heading into next season.

The big question now for the Wildcats is going to be how Jay Wright develops his team moving forward. Eric Paschall and Phil Booth are both fifth-year seniors. Jermaine Samuels is a sophomore that should be ready for a bigger role. The Wildcats have a terrific recruiting class coming in. There is a lot there to like, but for a program that has been a staple in the top five for the last five years, there may be something of a drop coming this season.

(Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

MARYLAND

Heading into the offseason Maryland had the look of a clear Big Ten title contender, even with Justin Jackson’s decision to enter the NBA draft. But those chances took a significant hit on withdrawal deadline day, as wing Kevin Huerter made the decision to forego his final two seasons of eligibility.

Losing a player of Huerter’s caliber, a versatile offensive playmaker who was also the team’s best perimeter defender, is a tough blow for Mark Turgeon’s team to absorb. With Anthony Cowan and Darryl Morsell returning and a talented group of freshmen led by Aaron Wiggins joining the perimeter rotation, Maryland won’t lack for bodies. But they won’t have a perimeter option as versatile as Huerter in the mix, which may drop them down the Big Ten pecking order.

It wasn’t all bad news for Maryland, as Bruno Fernando made the decision to return for his sophomore season, but a budding talent in the post doesn’t make up for what they lost.

BRIAN BOWEN

It’s hard not to feel bad for this kid at this point. He got caught in the FBI’s investigation in college basketball corruption and he is now forced to deal with the brunt of the blame for the seedy side of the sport. He wound up at South Carolina after transferring out of Louisville, but Bowen’s college career came to an end before it actually started once the NCAA made it clear it would be some time before he was ruled eligible to play.

TEXAS A&M

Losing Robert Williams, an expected first-round pick, isn’t a shock considering the fact that there was lottery buzz for him last spring.

But the NBA draft prospects aren’t as clear for either D.J. Hogg or Tyler Davis, yet both decided to forego their final season of eligibility and turn pro. In Davis the Aggies lose their most productive interior scoring option, and Hogg was a 6-foot-9 forward who had range well out beyond the three-point line.

Those departures leave Texas A&M rather thin in the post, with Isiah Jasey (3.3 mpg in 15 appearances last season) and Saint Francis (PA) transfer Josh Nebo (12.0 ppg, 8.2 rpg in 2016-17) being the returning big men. And in an SEC that, after making positive strides last season stands to be even better in 2018-19, the lack of front court depth could be a killer for Billy Kennedy’s team.

(Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

STANFORD

While the Cardinal did not have any players forego their remaining eligibility to turn pro, the program did lose a player who would have been on the short list of preseason candidates for Pac-12 Player of the Year.

Reid Travis, who averaged 19.5 points and 8.7 rebounds per game last season, withdrew his name from the draft but decided to move on from Stanford as a graduate transfer. With Michael Humphrey having exhausted his eligibility, Jerod Haase’s front court rotation took a major hit with Travis’ decision.

Stanford won’t lack for wings next season, with Oscar Da Silva, Kezie Okpala and Kodye Pugh all returning, but the options in the post are limited. Josh Sharma and Trevor Stanback are the returnees inside, with freshmen Lukas Kisunas and Keenan Fitzmorris joining the program to add depth.

WAKE FOREST

It’s tough to think of an ACC program hit harder by draft departures this spring than Wake Forest, which lost two of its top three scorers from a season ago in guard Bryant Crawford and center Doral Moore. Crawford led the Demon Deacons in both scoring and assists, averaging 16.9 points and 4.9 assists per game.

As for Moore, he chipped in with 11.1 points per game while also averaging a team-best 9.4 rebounds and 2.0 blocks per game. What makes this all worse for Danny Manning heading into his fifth year at the school is that there were other departures as well, most notably Keyshawn Woods transferring to Ohio State. As a result a lot will be asked of Brandon Childress and a talented recruiting class headlined by Jaylen Hoard.

(Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

THE DEADLINE WAS NOT GOOD TO THEM

THE BIG EAST

The Big East got crushed by graduation this offseason, as seven of the 13 players that received all-conference votes were seniors. Then Jalen Brunson and Mikal Bridges declared for the draft along with Donte DiVincenzo and Omari Spellman. Creighton’s Khyri Thomas is gone. So is Georgetown’s Markus Derrickson. The top of the league took such a hit it’s hard to picture who out of that group will actually be able to contend with Villanova in a down year for the Wildcats.

WICHITA STATE

The loss of Landry Shamet proved to be even bigger for the Shockers, despite Markis McDuffie making the decision to remove his name from the draft and return. Shamet was one of the best players in the American last season, averaging 14.9 points and 5.2 assists per game while shooting 48.9 percent from the field and 44.2 percent from three.

Losing Shamet was tough enough for the Shockers, as his departure leaves a major question mark at the point guard position. What made it an even tougher blow to absorb were the release of Alex Lomax (he committed to stay in Memphis and play for Penny Hardaway shortly thereafter) from his letter of intent and Austin Reaves’ decision to transfer to Oklahoma. With Shamet no longer in the fold, junior college All-American Ricky Torres will need to hit the ground running for Wichita State.

PENN STATE

After winning the Postseason NIT the Nittany Lions entered the offseason with positive momentum, and with many of the key pieces from that team set to return there were expectations of an NCAA tournament in 2019. Unfortunately for Penn State, while other Big Ten programs experienced the joy of having key players return after testing the NBA draft waters talented point guard Tony Carr was “all in” and decided to forego his remaining eligibility.

As noted this isn’t a roster that lacks talent, with Lamar Stevens, Mike Watkins and Josh Reaves among the returnees and a good recruiting class joining the ranks as well. But in Carr the Nittany Lions lost a player who led the team in both scoring and assists, and his possession percentage (29.6) ranked second in the Big Ten behind Wisconsin’s Ethan Happ. Penn State can still be a tournament team, but the loss of Carr is a big deal for Patrick Chambers.