Mike Scott

Delaware’s trip to MSG: Great experiences, missed opportunities

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NEW YORK, N.Y. – It wouldn’t be fair to say that Delaware caught a break that this happened to be the season they took part in the Preseason NIT.

They won the games that they had to win to get to Madison Square Garden and the semifinals of the country’s only true preseason tournament. They beat Penn. They went into Charlottesville and knocked off Virginia. They made it to the bright lights of MSG and a primetime showcase on ESPN on their own.

But I do think it is fair to say this: it didn’t hurt matters that the year the Blue Hens took part in the event just so happened to be the season that Monte’ Ross has his most talented roster in seven years in Newark, and that they just so happened to get put in a regional with a Virginia team that is now officially in the post-Mike Scott era.

If they happened to have gotten placed in Pitt’s regional, they may not have made it this far. If they had happened to have been invited to the event next season, than they would have been playing without star center — and potential NBA Draft pick? — Jamelle Hagins. This group had “Team of Destiny” written all over it. And when a Devon Saddler three cut a Kansas State lead that had grown to eight back to one, at 39-38, with 13:40 left in the game, everyone on press row had the same reaction: the Blue Hens might actually do this!

Alas, it wasn’t meant to be, as 32 points from Saddler weren’t enough for Delaware to complete the upset win over the Wildcats, losing 66-63 and missing out on a chance to take a swing at No. 4 Michigan on Friday.

The reason for the loss had nothing to do with intimidation, however. The Blue Hens didn’t make their way into the third place game because they were overwhelmed by the platform they were playing on or because they shied away from the challenge of playing a potential tournament team from the Big XII.

What cost them in this game was … spasming muscles?

With 15 minutes left in the game, one possession before that Saddler three cut Kansas State’s lead to 39-38, Hagins, who had 12 points and 15 boards before getting hurt, went down in serious pain, holding his legs. I could read his lips from press row. He said, simply, “Cramps. In both.” He’d return for a couple of possessions later in the contest, but Hagins was never the same. That was a massive loss; he has a chance to be an NBA Draft pick. Those don’t make their way down to Delaware too often.

“Who knows how this game would have turned out if Jamelle hadn’t come out,” Ross said. “They started pounding us inside when he came out.”

And those weren’t the only cramping issues that Delaware had to deal with. Jarvis Threatt, a sophomore and Delaware’s starting point guard, left the game with five minutes left as he was dealing with cramping issues. It’s kind of hard to pull off an upset when two of a team’s three best players are glued to the bench, getting their legs rubbed down by trainers with bags of ice.

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The beauty of Delaware’s trip to the Garden was that it was actually allowed to happen.

Far too often, the satellite rounds of the early season tournaments are nothing more than exhibitions and a guarantee made to the high-profile participants that they’ll get four games for signing up. Just ask Georgia. They lost to Youngstown State — “lost” is being kind; they were blown out at home by the Penguins — in the ‘opening round’ of the Legends Classic.

But who did you see lose to No. 1 Indiana on Monday night at the Barclays Center? And who did No. 11 UCLA beat on Tuesday? It certainly wasn’t Youngstown State. I know. I was there.

And that’s what makes the Preseason NIT so special.

“It would have been anticlimactic to beat Virginia and not get a chance to go to the Garden,” Ross said. “This is an earn your way tournament. It’s not predetermined. That’s what makes this tournament so special. For us, it was such a big deal to earn our way here and have an opportunity to play Kansas State.”

“I just hope it never changes, because it’s fantastic for a school like Delaware to have the opportunity we had. Like you said, it’s dwindling.”

The irony here is that people like me will paint this as a great story about the team from the little league winning the right to play with the big boys on the big stage. Use a couple of big words, toss in a few of alliterations and throw in some prose, and you’ve got yourself a recipe for a great story about those darling Blue Hens from the CAA.

Except the scribes are the only one that saw this group as a ‘David’.

“I knew coming into the game that we could play with them,” said Saddler, whose disgust for being asked about the implications of simply playing well on a big stage was as palpable as it was refreshing in its honesty. “It wasn’t no pride thing. We’re not into moral victories.”

I feel you, Devon. I do. And I don’t want to disagree with you, but I’m going to.

Saying that Delaware played badly in the first half would be a compliment. Saddler didn’t get it going until midway through the second half. His back court mates Jarvis Threatt and Terrell Rogers played as poorly as I’ve ever seen them play in the first 20 minutes. Kyle Anderson wasn’t hitting anything, and Delaware’s big men were getting abused on the offensive glass. The only guy that played well in the first half for Delaware was Hagins, and most of what he did was block and/or change enough shots that Kansas State couldn’t put together a big run. And despite that, the Blue Hens were only down two at the break.

In the second half, things didn’t get much better, as Hagins went down early, Threatt and Rogers continued their subpar play and Anderson still wasn’t hitting anything.

And despite all of that, Delaware went into the break down by two points and ended up losing by only three points to a team that is missing one player (and their head coach) from last year’s group that earned a No. 8 seed.

What happens when this team puts together 40 minutes of quality basketball?

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“There’s no such thing as great people in this world. There’s people, just like you and I, that take advantage of a great opportunity. We have a great opportunity right in front of us. Let’s take advantage of it.”

Those are the last words that Ross spoke to his team in the locker room before he sent them out to the Madison Square Garden floor. And while the Blue Hens fought and scrapped and threw every last punch they had against Kansas State, it wasn’t enough. The Wildcats were simply more physical and hit more key jump shots.

This wasn’t a wasted opportunity as much as it was a missed opportunity. Delaware could have won this game had they played better.

That will sting.

But that sting won’t last long.

Because the Blue Hens will have another great opportunity to take advantage of at 2:30 pm ET on Friday.

Their Madison Square Garden experience isn’t over yet.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

Conference Preview: ACC topped by Tobacco Road triumvirate

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Throughout the month of October, CollegeBasketballTalk will be rolling out our previews for the 2012-2013 season. Check back at 9 a.m. and just after lunch every day, Monday-Friday, for a new preview item.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To look at the rest of the Top 25, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

Sometimes, things have a way of working out. With Pitt, Syracuse and eventually Notre Dame preparing to join the ACC, unbalanced schedules are the wave of the future. This may be the last season in which the Triangle powers of Duke, North Carolina and N.C. State play one another twice apiece in the regular season. It just so happens that this is also the first time in a long time in which all three programs are nationally ranked and favored to reach the post-season as well, thanks to the Wolfpack resurgence.

This could be a rare jewel of a season in the ACC. And, hey, there are even nine other schools fielding teams this year. We knew that. That’s why we’re the college basketball experts.

Five things to know

1. Pitt and Syracuse join the league next season, which will drastically alter the character of a league that was once so very Southern.

2. Notre Dame will remain independent in football, but may have paved the way to full conference membership by agreeing to move basketball and other sports to the ACC at some point in the near future.

3. Roy Williams endured a cancer scare this fall, but is back and ready to lead his Tar Heels, who are gunning for a third straight 1st-place league finish.

4. Mark Gottfried is in just his second year as NC State head coach, but he has eight Big Dance appearances on his resume. One with the Wolfpack, five with Alabama, and two with Murray State.

5. Aside from hall of famers Mike Krzyzewski (11) and Roy Williams (7), the only other ACC coach with a Final Four appearance on his resume is Miami’s Jim Larranaga, who took George Mason to the brink in 2006.

Impact newcomers:

Rodney Purvis – 6’4”, 190 lb. G, NC State: Purvis (pictured, left) is one of those guys who can get to the hoop in a hurry and he’s not afraid to take some contact once he gets in amongst the trees. ACC coaches named him the preseason newcomer of the year, and we’re not going to dispute that.

Rasheed Sulaimon – 6’3”, 175 lb. G, Duke: Sulaimon is not quite the deadly jump-shooter Coach K had last year in Austin Rivers, but he has a respectable stroke to complement his ability to get to the rim. It probably goes without saying that he’s a very smart player as well, which means he should be able to improve as the season goes on.

T.J. Warren – 6’7”, 205 lb. SF, NC State: Warren is a rangy player from Durham who also drew interest from Chapel Hill. That he ended up in Raleigh is one sure sign the Wolfpack are on the rise. His ability to get open and make plays off the dribble will make him a key reserve on an already loaded team.

Amile Jefferson – 6’9”, 190 lb. F, Duke: Jefferson was a McDonald’s All-American, and was widely considered to be the top prospect coming out of hoops-mad Philly. He’s pretty slender, but he’ll still be a power forward in the mold of Gumby-like Tar Heel John Henson. Great body control, a nice shooting touch, and enough leverage to get inside when necessary.

Shaquille Cleare – 6’9” 270lb. C, Maryland: Cleare is a brick house. He can take it to the rim with authority, or drop in a hook shot over a bodied-up defender. James Padgett was forced to be the leading rebounder for the Terps last season, and it was too much for him. Here comes big-time help.

Breakout players:

Quinn Cook – 6’1” 175 lb. G, Duke: The Blue Devils have made do with combo guards at the point for a while now, if you consider that Kyrie Irving missed most of his one year in Durham due to “the toe”. If Cook makes good use of his increased playing time this year, he’ll become that playmaker who gets the ball inside to the Plumlees and frees up slashing Sulaimon and shooting Curry as marquee scorers.

Reggie Bullock – 6’7” 205 lb. G, UNC: Bullock had a great summer, showing off increased range and leadership skills in the North Carolina Pro-Am league. The most intriguing thing about Bullock is that he puts a wide range of perimeter abilities into a 6’7” body, which makes him a very difficult matchup on either end of the floor.

Ian Miller – 6’3” 186 lb. G, Florida State: Miller put together some really solid games in the ACC last season. He had an 18 point game to help usher in-state rival Miami out of the ACC tournament last season, then fouled out after just 15 minutes against Duke the next night. If Miller gets consistent alongside Michael Snaer, look out for the Seminoles.

James Michael McAdoo – 6’9” 220 lb. F, UNC: As much as everyone’s talking about McAdoo these days, you’d think he’d broken out already. In a way, he did. His wildly inconsistent showing as a freshman started to come together in March, culminating in a 15-point/19 minute explosion against Kansas in an Elite Eight loss. Expect many double-doubles this season.

Alex Len – 7’1” 225 lb. C, Maryland: Len had an up-and-down season as a new guy in College Park, partly because he had to sit out ten games, partly because he didn’t really speak English very well. He’s past those two problems now, and he’s added a lot of strength to his frame. Even if he just keeps up his 2 blocks per game pace, he’s making a huge impact. If he gets his score on, Maryland could break up the Triangle love fest.

Player of year: Lorenzo Brown – 6’5” 186 lb. G, NC State: CJ Leslie is getting the nod from plenty of pundits, and he is likely to be the most visible, highlight-reel-worthy member of the Pack this season. On a team with this much talent, and such high expectations, I’m putting the onus on Brown (pictured, right). His 6.3 assists per game last season ranked second only to Kendall Marshall in the league, and Brown is a major scoring threat as well. He can bomb from downtown, drive and dish, drive and score, and plays marvelous defense. He’s the engine that drives the Wolfpack bandwagon.

All conference performers: Brown; CJ Leslie, NC State; Michael Snaer, FSU; James Michael McAdoo, UNC; Mason Plumlee, Duke.

Coach under pressure: Jeff Bzdelik, Wake Forest – Now that Seth Greenberg is gone at Virginia Tech, it’s time for a passing of the torch. Many were nonplussed by Wake’s hiring of Bzdelik, a middling college coach at Air Force and Colorado best known for his time at the helm of the Denver Nuggets. Bzdelik has won all of five ACC games in two years, and he looks even less impressive thanks to the fast resurgence of NC State under Mark Gottfried.

Predicted finish

1. NC State – Too much talent. And, honestly, Sidney Lowe was never bad at landing talent, either. But Mark Gottfried seems to know what to do with it, and how to layer in incoming classes behind loyal veterans. That’s classic Tobacco Road-level stuff.

2. North Carolina – Only Kentucky lost more talent to the NBA last season than the Tar Heels, but Carolina has options. Roy Williams will have a nice blend of veterans and talented rookies ready to keep the train on the track.

3. Duke – The never-ending supply of Plumlees has become a core virtue of the Blue Devil program these days. With Marshall injured to start the season, and the point still somewhat in question, coaching will make all the difference. Oh, well then.

4. Florida State – Snaer talked his way onto our preseason watch list, which made us take more note of his play. The ‘Noles will probably struggle a bit without a Bernard James type in the paint, but there’s plenty of talent to make it work, and always that dag nasty Leonard Hamilton defense.

5. Miami – Senior-laden and big as all-get-out. Kenny Kadji and Reggie Johnson will once again take care of all scoring and defense inside the half-circle, and Durand Scott will be there to drop dimes or score as needed.

6. Maryland – Mark Turgeon may have lost out to Kentucky on some prime recruits, but who hasn’t sung that song in recent seasons? The former Wichita State and Texas A&M head man has a fair amount of talent, and if he can get Pe’Shon Howard and Nick Faust on the floor together, things could go very well.

7. Virginia – Tony Bennett keeps bringing in heralded classes, then watching half of the new guys walk out the door soon thereafter. For years, his rock was Mike Scott, who finally graduated after getting the ‘Hoos back to the Big Dance last season. This year, much falls on senior point guard Jontel Evans, who came up lame to start the season.

8. Georgia Tech – Brian Gregory has a young lineup drawn almost entirely from within the borders of the Peach State. Mfon Udofia and Kammeon Holsey are the inside-out duo, so they’ll need at least one more scorer to step up.

9. Clemson – Brad Brownell is a good coach, but his Tigers have yet to establish an identity. To be fair, their identity under former head coach Oliver Purnell was “over promise, peak too soon, under deliver,” so a little patience may be in order.

10. Wake Forest – Travis McKie is such a strong player, he’d probably be an all-league performer if he were playing elsewhere. CJ Harris is going to do his level best to get the Deacs where they want to go, but losing Tony Chennault to Villanova and Carson Desrosiers to Providence hurt, a lot.

11. Boston College – The jury is still out on whether Steve Donahue’s fancy Ivy League ways will translate to Chestnut Hill. The talent level at BC is just not ACC-caliber right now, so the system will have to triumph for this ranking to change.

12. Virginia Tech – Too much turmoil in Blacksburg. Seth Greenberg was let go too late in the offseason for his unknown replacement, James Johnson, to get a real grip on the reins. This team could struggle to recover for some time.

Eric Angevine is the editor of Storming the Floor. He tweets @stfhoops.

Virginia guard Jontel Evans out six weeks after stress fracture surgery

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Virginia guard Jontel Evans will be out for six weeks after undergoing surgery to repair a stress fracture in his right foot, the school announced Wednesday.

Evans has started 70 games for the Cavaliers in his three seasons with the team, averaging 7.3 points and 3.9 assists per game last season.

“Jontel, obviously, he’s got a strong mind, and he’s a quick healer, so hopefully he’ll be back soon,” head coach Tony Bennett said in a release. “It was something that needed to be done, and everything went well. It’s unfortunate. You don’t want to have to miss your preseason.”

“It’s an unfortunate situation for [Evans], going into his senior year,” said guard Joe Harris in the release.

“He’s team captain, he had a great summer, played really well in Europe, and now he’s got kind of a minor setback. But he said the surgery and everything went well today. [Evans has] real high spirits, and he’s got the right attitude, I feel, to come back.”

Evans is even more important this season as the Cavaliers look to compensate for the loss of Mike Scott, the team’s leading scorer and rebounder from last season.

Harris, a 6-6 native of Washington, averaged 11.5 points per game last season and could help to fill the void, but Evans’ continued growth on the offensive end once he returns will be key for Virginia.

The Cavaliers finished 22-10 last season and earned a berth to the NCAA tournament in 2011-12. They open their season on Nov. 9 against George Mason.

Daniel Martin is a writer and editor at JohnnyJungle.com, covering St. John’s. You can find him on Twitter:@DanielJMartin_

The Morning Mix

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– On Thursday, the most highly anticipated college announcement of the Fall will take place when Aaron and Andrew Harrison will decide between Kentucky, Maryland and SMU. The recruitment of the Harrison twins has been played out in public for what feels like the past 36 months. But thankfully, the saga will all be over with on Thursday (…..Until they decommit in 2013….. and transfer in 2014…..) 

Cracked Sidewalks has done it again. This time around the Marquette bloggers have  determined the advanced rankings for the top-150 teams in 2014. Yeah, that’s two years from now,The rankings were made based on roster strength, available scholarships for recruits and NBA placement. It’s really good stuff if you don’t mind all the math lingo

– Several collegiate stars tweeted their reactions to the ESPN 30-for-30 documentary “Broke”, a film highlighting the numerous financial struggles of retried professional athletes. The film debuted last night and is a must-watch

– Speaking of the the film industry, former-VCU stud Larry Sanders is making is acting debut in an upcoming flick loaded with famous people you’ve probably heard of

– While major conferences continue to chase to buckets of college football gold, the Atlantic-10 is quickly building a high-major basketball-centric powerhouse. After adding VCU and Butler during the summer, the conference has reached an eight-year television deal with ESPN, CBS Sports Network and NBC Sports Group for its media and television rights (If I’m any of the basketball-centric Big East schools, I’m working my tail off to get in to the Atlantic-10 before 2014, exit fee or not)

– Speaking of ESPN, it looks like the World Wide Leader has been forced to get involved in the Ed O’Bannon lawsuit and must turn over any contracts related to the issue

– Julius Randle, one of the top class of 2013 recruits in the country, has narrowed down his list of colleges. Hint: Duke and UNC didn’t make the cut

– Jabari Parker, the top recruit in Randle’s class, will take official visits to Duke and Michigan this month, and is set to make his announcement in November

– Rush The Court’s Chris Johnson (Not to be confused with Chris Johnson of my 0-4 fantasy football team) provides an interesting piece on the court of public opinion in reference to the situations involving Kentucky freshman Nerlens Noel and former-Duke forward Lance Thomas

– Belmont has been the leader of the pack in the Atlantic-Sun for the past decade. So the music-centric Nashville school is taking it’s talents to the Ohio Valley Conference, on the broad shoulders of the Bruins backcourt

– Notre Dame head coach Mike Brey is widely considered one of the best, most stand-up guys in the sport. Central Michigan head coach Keno Davis (Formerly of Providence and Drake), is on the opposite end of the spectrum. You’ll need to understand this in order to realize why it’s OK that Brey kinda sorta poached one of Davis’ recruits. But Ben Miraski of Mid-Major Madness does not feel as though Brey should be given “a pass”

– Akron’s Quincy Diggs, the reigning Mid-American Conference Sixth Man of the Year, has been suspended for the season by head coach Keith Dambrot for violating the university’s Code of Student Conduct

– Virginia’s starting point guard Jontel Evans will miss 4-6 weeks because of foot surgery. The senior guard was nagged by foot pain throughout workouts, and was diagnosed with a stress fracture last week. With the departure of Mike Scott, Evans was to be the key cog for the Cavaliers this season

– You could make the case that Florida State guard Michael Snaer has accomplished as much at the collegiate ranks as he possibly can. The preseason All-American won the ACC Tournament, received the tournament Most Outstanding Player award, hit not one but two buzzer-beaters last season, including one at Cameron Indoor stadium. But despite the achievements and accolades, the senior sharpshooter still has some unfinished business

– Mike Montgomery continues to haul in recruits at a premium pace. Florida native Sam Singer is the latest recruit to commit to the Cal Bears program. While Singer isn’t as talented as other 2013 recruits, Jabari Byrd and Jordan Maxwell, he is a quality mid-to-high major recruit. If Montgomery can reel in Marcus Lee, who is set to announce in the near future, the Cal Bears would have pulled off a mammoth-sized recruiting coup

– Many, including myself, believed that North Carolina had slipped through the administrative cracks and would not face NCAA punishment. Luckily for all of us, I was wrong. NCAA President Mark Emmert has stated that the University could still face sanctions for academic fraud

– College players flocked to “Naval Weapon Systems” class at UNC? (Or “Super-Soakers & Water Balloons” as Tyler Hansbrough referred to it)

– Murray State’s Zay Jackson is in discussion with prosecutors to get a plea deal arranged before his preliminary hearing on second degree assault charges

– Mike DeCourcy previews the challenges ahead for several preseason top-25 teams

– Louisville center Gorgui Dieng was the focus of a lecture held by a university-sponsored club. Seriously

– Anybody interested in a La Salle season preview? If so, this is the link for you

– Various Midnight Madness updates: Baylor, Creighton, Kentucky and Mississippi State

– Schedule previews and updates: Eastern Kentucky, Morehead StateSt. John’s,

– Bro in Syracuse jersey keeps stealing beer from Montana liquor stores (Yeah, I thought it was Devendorf too)

Troy Machir is the managing editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @TroyMachir.

DeShaun Thomas’ step-back may be a leap forward

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Some of us here at College Basketball Talk are not known for our mathematical genius. I count myself paramount amongst the numerically baffled, and Twitter will again be awash with the sardonic tag #Daustermath this season, without a doubt. That doesn’t mean we don’t like or value statistics, especially in the hands of those who know how to read them – first and foremost the estimable Ken Pomeroy.

One suspects that Pomeroy is much like the athletes he covers, in that the work he puts in during the offseason makes him a champion when the games count. Updates to the KenPom.com blog are few and far between in the summer, but when they do appear, they tell us oh, so much.

This week’s post, titled Shot Chart Champions, uses the kind of situational analysis that makes numbers live, breathe and predict things. Pomeroy used the CBSSports.com shot chart to sort out which returning players shoot best from inside the arc, but he also took it a step further. He separated out the true under-the-bucket finishers from those who can comfortably step back and knock down a jumper. Except that, in one case, there was no separation. Ohio State’s DeShaun Thomas excelled as a down-low grinder and as a mid-range shooter. Here are the money numbers from KenPom.com:

Best FG% inside 6′

Deshaun Thomas, Ohio State (129/184, 70.1%). Thomas’s freshman season most strongly compares to Luke Harangody. The more I look at Thomas’s stats (great) and his draft stock (not great, at least yet), the more I think he’s headed down the Harangody career path (illegal cross-race comparison aside). He might be a great college player that won’t get the full attention of pro scouts. Given that there aren’t a lot of dunks in these numbers, Thomas’s close 2P% as a sophomore was pretty amazing.

and then

Best Mid-range FG% (6′-20′)

Deshaun Thomas (67/143, 46.9%). Keep in mind, there were only 31 players that had 100 mid-range shots recorded. Still, it’s impressive to see Thomas pop up as exceptional as both a finisher and a mid-range jump shooter.

Being a grinder and a shooter gives an inside player a leg up on the pro game, for sure. It does not, however, ensure a guaranteed contract. Last season’s best two-point performer regardless of range was Virginia’s Mike Scott, who parlayed his steady, unspectacular game into a 2nd-round selection, going 43rd to the Atlanta Hawks. Still, a 2nd-round shot beats the heck out of no shot at all.

Virginia loses 82-73 to Netherlands B team, drops to 1-1 on trip

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What a difference a day – and 22 turnovers – can make.

One day after beating the Netherlands B team 89-62 in the first game of their tour through Europe, the Virginia Cavalier fell to the same team 82-73 thanks in part to 22 turnovers.

Junior forward Joe Harris led the Cavalier with 23 points and point guard Jontel Evans added 14 to go along with six assists, but the turnovers combined with Netherlands’ improved shooting proved to be too much to overcome.

“First, credit that team; those are a little more mature, grown men that had their pride wounded (yesterday),” said head coach Tony Bennett in the school release.

“They out-physicaled us. They were so ready, and they really took it to us and shot at an incredible clip. But we couldn’t match their intensity or just their ability to do what they wanted. They imposed their will on us; we didn’t do much.”

Virginia got off to a good start, scoring the first nine points of the game, but the Dutch answered with a 9-1 run to get back into the contest.

Stefan Mladenovic and Gerald Robinson scored 15 points apiece to lead the Netherlands, whose were up by as many as 20 points (66-46 at the end of the third) before Virginia made a run in the fourth.

The trip, which continues in Belgium, is the first step in addressing life without All-ACC forward Mike Scott and guard Sammy Zeglinski.

According to Ken Pomeroy’s numbers (subscription needed), Scott accounted for 29.7% of Virginia’s offensive possessions, and with Harris ranking second on the team in that category (21.1%) he’s the most likely player to become a primary offensive option.

But are there other players who can step up? Evans played well for much of last season and can be one of the better point guards in the ACC, and center Mike Tobey gives them an offensive threat at the position that the Cavaliers haven’t had.

Sophomore Malcolm Brogdon missed the end of last season with a foot injury, but both he and freshman Justin Anderson will also factor into things offensively for the Cavaliers.

Losing Scott is a big loss, but while Virginia may not have one player who can step into that role they do have multiple players who can help carry the load.

Virginia returning to the NCAA tournament will depend on whether or not those players can do so on a consistent basis.

Raphielle is also the assistant editor at CollegeHoops.net and can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.