The Morning Mix

Leave a comment

Where do we even begin today?

National News Story #1:

– Jim Calhoun is going to announce his retirement later today after 26 years as head coach of the UConn Huskies. Former-Husky and current assistant coach Kevin Ollie is reportedly set to take over the reigns from the legendary ball coach. The program isn’t exactly on stable ground, but at least they know what lies ahead.  Aside from the three national championships and decades of dominance, Calhoun was the finest example of a blue-collar head coach the game may have ever seen

– Here are all the best-reads from the heavy-hitters on Calhoun’s retirement and legacy: Garry Parrish, Jeff Goodman, Mike DeCourcy, and Dana O’Neil

– Some other very good-reads regarding the retirement: Rob Dauster, Mike Miller, Jeff Eisenberg, and Quinn Rochford

– Can Kevin Ollie actually succeed as head coach of UConn? Replacing a legend is not an easy thing to do

– Calhoun built up a near library of entertaining soundbites and quotes during his time in Storrs. Here are all the best ones

The Top-10 moments from the Calhoun Era

– Jim Cahloun and the UConn Huskies had three “One Shining Moment” montages. Which one is your favorite?

– Here is how the Twittershphere reacted to the news of Calhoun’s retirement decision

National News Story #2:

Notre Dame is leaving the Big East in order to join the ACC for all sports except hockey and football. I’ll give $100 to anybody who can convince me that South Bend is on the Atlantic Coast. Leave your best attempt in the comments section below. I’ll be waiting.

– Here’s what a bunch of the heavy-hitters had to say (Most of them share the same opinions): Gary Parrish, Jeff GoodmanDan Wetzel, Mike DeCourcy, and Kevin McNamara

– Jason McIntyre thinks the league is dead in the water

– The addition of Notre Dame brings the ACC to a grand total of 15 teams. Could the conference be looking to add a 16th team to make things even across the board?

The rest of the College Hoops World:

– USC guard Maurice Jones, the team’s leading scorer from a year ago, has decided to transfer. This decision comes just a week after it was determined that the Trojan’s guard had been ruled academically ineligible

Andy Glockner chimes in on the Billy Clyde Gilispie fiasco down in Lubbock, TX. The school has a difficult decision to make believe it or not

– Chrishawn Hopkins has been dismissed from the Butler Bulldogs program for violating team rules

– Robbie Hummel just cannot catch a break. The former-Boilermaker and fan favorite partially tore his meniscus and will miss 3-4 weeks of the Euro hoops schedule

– The top non-conference games of 2012-2013 featuring NEC teams

Larry Drew II has been named the starting guard at UCLA. Coach Howland calls the former Tar Heel “our most indispensable player”. They’re doomed

– Who are the top centers in the Missouri Valley Conference? Mid-Major Madness has the answers

– Remember the ticket scalping scandal that engulfed the Kansas athletic department a few years back? Of course you did. Well, we have ourselves an update. I bet you didn’t see that coming today

Remember, if you find an article that is worthy of being in The Morning Mix, be sure to use the #ReadoftheDay hashtag on Twitter. 

Troy Machir is the managing editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @TroyMachir.

The Morning Mix

Leave a comment

Happy “Bi-quarterly Expansionocalypse Update Tuesday” everybody!

– The WAC is closing up shop for FBS football. That conference is dead in the water. Abeline Christian and Incarnate Word will be joining the Division-I ranks, headed to the Southland Conference. No word yet on Little Sisters of the Poor…..

– Rush The Court’s Christopher Johnson provides a brilliant op-ed on the NY Times article involving Dan Dakich’s brief tenure at West Virginia

– UCLA’s Josh Smith is struggling to lose weight? Shocker. I know

– The guys at CBS’ Eye on CBball continue their coaches survey series. 58% of coaches polled believe players should get compensated

– Apparently, the administrations at both Louisville and Kentucky monitor the social networks of student-athletes for potential client relations. See, I have no problem with this. Schools like LSU, Nebraska and Oklahoma were doing it all wrong, but #BBN and “The ‘Ville” have gotten it right. Glen Logan and NBC’s own Mike Miller both offer solid opinions on the matter

– The words “Rutgers” and “NCAA Tournament” haven’t been said in the same sentence in quite some time.  Despite the transferring of Gilvydas Biruta, the Scarlet Knights could sneak in to the field of 68 in 2012-2013

– Washington has added walk-on potential #AllNameTeam candidate Quinn Sterling. Kid has an amazing story too

– Former-Florida guard and Virginia Tech-transfer Allen Chaney is hoping to revitalize his collegiate career at High Point despite an ailing heart condition that sidelined him two years ago

– A list of all the 2012 Big Sky transfers

– Iona has landed a commitment from former-Penn State transfer Tre Bowman. The junior guard will be able to play immediately but the team may struggle to embrace him. Why? Because just under a month ago, Iona-bound Michael Hayns was shot and killed in Chicago. The Gaels are now foreced to grieve the loss of a teammate and embrace a new one at the same time

– Oklahoma State’s potential season success took a hit on Monday with the announcement that gritty sophomore guard Cezar Guerrero is transferring out of Stillwater

– Sudanese big-man Mankog Mathiang has earned academic clearance at Louisville but is still waiting to hear back about his overall eligibility for this season

A great take from ESPN’s Myron Medcalf on the numerous recent struggles of Calvin Godfrey. A hot prospect out of the midwest in 2009, Godfrey has never been able to mature or develop past the “prospect” phase, as evidence from his recently denied NCAA transfer status

– Former-Indiana recruit Rob Patterson is going to attend Brewster Academy. This, coming just a week after the rising freshman guard was denied eligibility. The Hoosiers have already overbooked their class of 2013, so it is unlikely that Patterson will head to Bloomington after his year at the New Hampshire prep school

– This Kentucky-related topic got much less chatter than I expected. Rant Sports, the site that published the original post, went back to the same subject later in the day without referencing the conversation-starter or the reaction at all

– Aaron and Andrew Harrison, the most popular package of twin recruits since the Wear Bros. have set their announcement date for October 29. It’s either going to be Kentucky (#BBN) or Maryland (Under Armor) ?

– Hilariously-Awesome-Post-of-the-Day: Colorado bloggers had a Q&A session with the french broadcasters provided the radio call for the Buffs’ recent exhibition games

– Tom Crean snapped a photo with Young Jeezy? That’s trill

– Set the “way-back machine” to 1992! Limited Edition Pop-Tart boxes are back! Of course there is in-depth box analysis on this!

– And to think…..I was positive that the portrait of Anthony Davis made out of Reese Puffs would be the weirdest piece of art I’ve ever seen. I was wrong. OF COURSE IT WAS MADE IT KENTUCKY

– Basketball hoops made out of yarn. Weird

Remember, if you find an article that is worthy of being in The Morning Mix, be sure to use the #ReadoftheDay hashtag on Twitter. 

Troy Machir is the managing editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @TroyMachir.

Breaking down the draft: Who will get a GM fired?

Leave a comment

Over the next couple of days, each of our writers here at College Basketball Talk will weigh on certain topics and prospects. Yesterday’s question? Most like to make the All-Star team without getting picked in the lottery? Today’s question? Who is the most likely to get a GM fired:

Eric Angevine: Hate to say it, because I loved watching him in college, but John Henson is a total cipher in terms of pro potential. And yet, he’s looking likely to be picked pretty high. If he ends up with a coach who can’t develop the parts of his game that are lacking, or isn’t creative enough to find a use for his Gumby-like frame, it’ll be a debacle. The GM who chooses Henson has to know what he’s going to do with him from day one, know when to have patience and when to push… it’s not a task I’d envy with that much dough on the line.

Raphielle Johnson: Andre Drummond. He’s an exceptional athlete; there’s no denying that. But in regards to the skill set when it comes to a solid post move (and counter) to begin with I’ve got my doubts. Hate to put this type of label on a young man, but Drummond could end up being the answer to this question.

Daniel Martin: Andre Drummond. Perry Jones name often surfaced in this discussion during the season, but now that his stock has slipped toward the latter end of the lottery, he is turning into a solid risk. Drummond, on the other hand, has tremendous upside because of his athletic ability, but the question will be if he consistently applies himself at the professional level. It’s not a matter of character for Drummond, as he isn’t a team disturbance, but it will be whether he finds the key to unlock his potential.

Mike Miller: Andre Drummond. Normally I’d say Perry Jones III. But it seems his draft stock will properly represent his future league impact. Drummond, on the other hand, will tantalize teams for years with his physical gifts. Even if one team gives up on him, another will bite. And another. And so on. Heck, he could get three or four GMs fired.

Rob Dauster: There were two obvious answers to this question: Andre Drummond and Perry Jones III. Seeing as Drummond has been thoroughly discussed, I’ll take PJ III. His stock has fallen precipitously since he was projected as a top five pick in last year’s draft. That’s something that will happen when you get labeled as soft and passive and inconsistent. PJ III has the physical ability and the potential to be the best player on the floor just about every time he steps onto the court. If he falls to 18th or 20th (which isn’t out of the question) and he lives up to his potential, I can’t imagine that many owners will be happy about passing on him.

Breaking down the draft: Most likely all-star outside the lottery

1 Comment

Over the next couple of days, each of our writers here at College Basketball Talk will weigh on certain topics and prospects. Yesterday’s question? Who will be the steal of the second round? Today’s question? Most like to make the All-Star team without getting picked in the lottery:

Eric Angevine: Since there are some guys who are on the edge of the lottery who might sneak in, I’m going with someone who seems certain to be picked later in the first round. Marquis Teague ran point for the national champs. He’s a kid still growing into his potential, but he already has that huge feather in his cap. Being picked low, he’ll get to join a quality playoff contender where he’ll be surrounded by veterans in a solid team concept. That sounds like a recipe for growth that could turn the raw talent into an All Star before it’s all said and done.

Raphielle Johnson: Perry Jones III. Maybe he ends up going in the lottery after all but with much of the chatter being that his stock drops him just outside of it I’ll take Jones. Yes there are concerns about the motor, but he’s also a seriously gifted basketball player. He could end up with a team that’s coming off of a playoff appearance, and hopefully that would include some good veteran influences.

Daniel Martin: Moe Harkless. Rumors are circulating that Harkless could end up in the lottery, but, if he ends up outside of it, watch out. His size and length has caught the attention of scouts and, as he develops a killer scoring instinct, he becomes more and more dangerous. It could take him a few years to get his feet underneath him at the NBA level, but he is mature and willing to learn, which can only help him.

Mike Miller: Tony Wroten. Wroten’s got the skills and size to be a dynamic playmaker in the league. He’s also got the confidence. But he could just as easily languish on the bench for years because of poor decision-making and an erratic shot. But if he lands on a team that can capitalize on his talents, well, he’s the type who’ll make jaw-dropping plays others can’t envision, let alone pull off.

Rob Dauster: I’m going to go with Royce White. White is an immensely talented player and a matchup nightmare as a 6-foot-8, 260 lb power forward that can run the point. The biggest red flag regarding White has to do with his anxiety issues and the trouble that he’s gotten into in the past, but he couldn’t have been more honest or forthcoming about them in the media in recent months. The biggest concern regarding White? His fear of flying. Is that why he canceled his remaining workouts?

Breaking down the draft: Second round steals

Leave a comment

Over the next couple of days, each of our writers here at College Basketball Talk will weigh on certain topics and prospects. Yesterday’s question? Who will be the biggest bust in this year’s lottery. Today’s question? Who will be the steal of the second round:

Eric Angevine: I’m going with Jae Crowder out of Marquette. The positives about Crowder fill up a notebook: he’s tough, physical, built like a battleship, stays fired up and energetic, and can shoot from outside. The only knock anyone can seem to come up with is that he’s a ‘tweener’ in that he’s 6’7”. But he has long arms that will help him defend wherever his future coach puts him on the floor, so let’s not get hung up on labels. This guy’s a hardcore baller.

Raphielle Johnson: Scott Machado. Really thought for much of the season that Machado, one of the nation’s best floor generals, should go in the first round. He slips into the second he’s at the very least going to be a good backup point guard to begin his career. With the right system and the opportunities to make plays in pick-and-roll situations Machado will be of great value to a team.

Daniel Martin: Jae Crowder proved in college that he could compete and win in a high-major, high-competition conference. Questions linger because of his size, but there is nothing more valuable in the second round as a guy who will play hard every night and work to fill in the gaps on a playoff team.

Mike Miller: Jared Cunningham. Was tempted to choose Doron Lamb — someone’s gonna be delighted to acquire his shooting skills — but I’ll go with Cunningham for the upside. Few players in the entire draft are more physically gifted than the 6-5 guard. He’ll play defense, provide scoring off the bench and once his jumper becomes more consistent, be an All-Star caliber player for years.

Rob DausterDarius Miller. The odds of finding an all-star in the second round of the NBA Draft are more-or-less non-existent. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t players capable of playing a role. If there is anything we’ve learned from guys like Bruce Bowen, James Posey and now Danny Green, it’s that a 6-7 wing that can lock up defensively and knock down open threes, that there is a place for them in the NBA. That’s Miller.

Breaking down the draft: Who should be the No. 2 pick?

3 Comments

Over the next couple of days, each of our writers here at College Basketball Talk will weigh on certain topics and prospects. Yesterday’s question? Who will be the biggest bust in this year’s lotteryToday’s question? Who should be the No. 2 pick:

Eric Angevine: This is a very difficult decision. For me it comes down to a choice between MKG and Thomas Robinson. Both are absolutely ferocious in the paint and very athletic. Both can rebound. So I dig a little deeper in making my choice. Despite his bulk, Robinson handles the ball so easily – he was able to start the Jayhawk break by passing out of a defensive rebound, or really speeding things up by taking off downcourt on the dribble. His evolving midrange game and truly frightening upper-body development make him tough to pass up at the second spot. I wouldn’t.

Raphielle Johnson: Michael Kidd-Gilchrist. Bradley Beal would be a better offensive player for Charlotte, but regardless of who the Bobcats draft that team is going to stink for the foreseeable future. With the hiring of Mike Dunlap and their young roster patience seems to be the prevailing theme there, so they can afford to go with the guy who isn’t as refined offensively but seems to have more upside.

Daniel Martin: Considering his skill set, his ceiling may not be as high as some other prospects available with the second pick, but Michael Kidd-Gilchrist can make an impact and, most importantly, brings maturity to a team that was historically bad last season. The Bobcats don’t have the luxury of rolling the dice and taking a high-risk/high-reward player, which should rule out a player like Andre Drummond. Don’t be surprised if Charlotte goes with Thomas Robinson, another mature prospect.

Mike Miller: Brad Beal. He’s the most polished player among the lottery picks and would be an immediate starter in Charlotte. His poise, versatility and overall game would be a blessing for a team that needs all of that. Still, he wouldn’t be the savior. That’ll require many, many players.

Rob DausterWith the hiring of Mike Dunlap, the pick for Charlotte should be Michael Kidd-Gilchrist. I think that he has the highest ceiling when it comes to the players being discussed as the potential second pick, and Dunlap has a track record for developing players. Look at what he did with Moe Harkless at St. John’s this past season, and there are quite a few similarities between Harkless and MKG. But as Mike said, one pick is no where near the answer for the Bobcats.