Johnathan Motley

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2017 NCAA tournament: Here are nine big men that can carry their teams to a Final Four

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One of the great things about the 2017 NCAA Tournament is that there will be a number of great big men taking the floor all over the field.

There are one-and-done NBA Draft prospects, senior veterans, sophomore All-Americans, juniors coming off of career seasons. It’s a wide variety of players on this list, but they are all low post studs who you need to see during the next few weeks.

While many of these guys are playing on teams that expect to make deep tournament runs, there are other elite bigs who might only last for a round or two.

Make sure to catch these guys if you can.

Caleb Swanigan, Purdue: The man known as Biggie as much for his frame (6-9, 250 pounds) as his game (18.5 points and 12.6 rebounds per game), Swanigan might be the premier big man in the country. His production is immense and consistent as he’s registered 26 double-doubles on the season along with four 20-20 games. After spending last year as somewhat of an understudy to A.J. Hammonds, Swanigan this year has emerged as a national player of the year candidate as the numbers he’s put up are not only huge, but they’re also not a product of tempo inflation. The Boilermakers are in the middle of the pack in terms of pace, and Swanigan’s efficiency numbers are all strong, especially his 33.3 defensive rebounding percentage, which ranks third nationally.

Ethan Happ, Wisconsin: Happ is much in the same mold as Swanigan, if not quite the voracious rebounder but certainly skilled, effective and a serious difference-maker on the defensive end. Happ is putting up 13.9 points and 9.1 rebounds per game while shooting 58.2 percent from the field. His offense extends beyond just scoring, however, has he’s an adept distributor and excellent on the offensive boards. Wisconsin may be entering the NCAA tournament having just fought off a late-season skid, but Happ is as good and reliable as they come.

Power Rankings 1-68 | Duke deserved a 1 seed | Committee got bubble right

REGIONAL BREAKDOWNS: East | Midwest | South | West

Johnathan Motley, Baylor: The latest in a long line of length, athletic big men at Baylor under Scott Drew, Motley has had a brilliant season that helped push the Bears to No. 1 in the country at one point and his draft stock into the first round. The 6-foot-10 junior is putting up 17.3 points and 9.9 rebounds per game after averaging 11 and 5 a year ago. He’s one of the most relentless offensive rebounders in the country, and rarely does a game go by without a tip dunk from him. He and fellow Baylor big Jo Lual-Acuil anchor Baylor’s amoeba zone that will undoubtedly be difficult for teams unacquainted with it to crack this month.

Bonzie Colson, Notre Dame:  Colson is a big by position only, as at 6-foot-5, he doesn’t fit the typical definition. His size, though, doesn’t preclude him from putting up big numbers in the post, as he’s averaging 17.5 points and 10.2 rebounds per game. He’s ultra-crafty and possesses basketball IQ in abundance. He’s more than capable of beating teams inside (54 percent shooting on 2s) and outside (40.7 percent on 3s) while also being a better rebounder and shot blocker than his size and limited athleticism would suggest possible.

Mike Daum, South Dakota State: You may not know the name now, but after a Daum-inant performance against No. 1 Gonzaga in the first round, you’ll probably find yourself Daum-anding a Daum-onstration on why he’s so Daum-aging to a defense. He scored 51 points in a game earlier this year and went for 35 points and 12 boards in the Summit League title game. That should be worth some free Daum-inoes after the game.

Jock Landale, St. Mary’s: The Gaels have largely been overshadowed, not only nationally by in their own conference, by Gonzaga, and Landale’s fantastic season has been underappreciated. The 6-foot-11 junior is shooting 60.9 percent from the floor, averaging 16.8 points along with 9.3 rebounds per game. His is a name to know well this month.

Przemek Karnowski, Gonzaga: The man is a mountain. At 7-foot-1 and 300 pounds, there are few college players that can counter Karnowski’s size, but that’s not the only way he’s able to be effective. He’s a 60.1 percent shooter, yes, but Karnowski’s true talent is his ability to pass. Given his girth, teams frequently send double-teams his way, but they are often proven ineffective and he’s able to first diagnose them and then able to beat them with his vision and deftness at moving the ball. His size and ability is one piece of what makes the Zags so seriously good.

Angel Delgado, Seton Hall: Delgado is another double-double machine on this list, averaging 15.3 points and 13.1 rebounds per outing. He ranks in the top-12 in both offensive and defensive rebounding percentage nationally, per KenPom, while playing major minutes for a big. He doesn’t offer the same level of rim protection as some of the other players on this list, but his rebounding eliminates opportunities for opponents while creating them for his team.

Lauri Markkanan, Arizona: The freshman 7-footer’s big season helped the Wildcats not only stay afloat by thrive early in the season with Alonzo Trier sidelined, and he’s established himself as quite the draft prospect. The most appealing aspect of his game is the 43.2 percent he shoots on the more than four 3-point attempts he averages per game. He’s no slouch on the boards, either, averaging 7.1 per game.

Motley plays big in No. 11 Baylor’s win over No. 10 West Virginia

Rod Aydelotte/Waco Tribune Herald via AP
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Even as Baylor has floundered some down the stretch, the Bears have been able to count on Johnathan Motley being a monster. The 6-foot-10 forward has been putting up numbers and shooting up draft boards.

Against No. 10 West Virginia, he showed off all his skills – and it resulted in a win, as the 11th-ranked Bears topped the Mountaineers, 71-62, in Waco on Monday in a much-needed victory.

Motley was superb once again, going for 23 points, eight rebounds, three blocks and two assists in 35 minutes. He shot it well from the field, going 6 of 12, but was a perfect 11 of 11 from the free-throw line. It was a big-time performance, especially with point guard Manu Lecomte out with an ankle injury.

Monday was nothing particularly special in terms of performance from Motley as he’s been consistently great during Big 12 play. He had 27 and 11 against Iowa State and 21 and 16 against Oklahoma just last week alone. He’s been overshadowed some by Baylor’s early season success – the story was the Bears and coach Scott Drew, not Motley – and that Frank Mason is not only the no-doubt Big 12 player of the year, but maybe the frontrunner for the national award as well.

He’s been really, really good.

Motley is averaging just short of a double-double with 17.3 points and 9.8 rebounds along with 1.0 blocks per game. He’s not the double-double machine of Caleb Swanigan, but he’s got nine during Big 12 play. He also put up 32 points and 20 rebounds against Texas. There aren’t many better performances than that around the country.

Against the Mountaineers, Motley struggled some early, going 1 of 5 from the field with just four points in the first half. He made five of his next seven shots, though, and made nine second-half free throws to score 19 after the break to get Baylor in the win column after a three-losses-in-four-games stretch.

Jo Lual-Acuil rightfully gets a ton of credit for being the anchor of Baylor’s defense, but pairing the 7-footer with Motley is what makes the Bears’ defense so stout. Teams have an effective field goal percentage of just 44.8 against the Bears and are making just 43.8 percent of their shots inside the arc. The length of Lual-Acuil and Motley is a huge reason why.

The game was somewhat rare for West Virginia as the Mountaineers forced 18 turnovers, which was at a rate of 26.5 percent (better than their Big 12 average), and still lost. Some of it certainly can be attributed to the absence of forward Esa Ahmad, who was out with a back injury, but 3 of 15 shooting from 3-point range was a killer overall.

West Virginia and Baylor are jockeying with Iowa State for second place in the Big 12, but if everyone holds serve, it’ll be a three-way tie in the country’s toughest conference. If the Cyclones can win in Morgantown on Friday, though, Steve Prohm’s group will claim the spot outright. If West Virginia wins, the most likely scenario (assuming Baylor beats Texas) puts the Mountaineers second, Baylor third and Iowa State fourth for the tournament in Kansas City next week.

Baylor 7-footer Jo Acuil out eight weeks

Associated Press
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With returnees such as seniors Taurean Waller-Prince and Rico Gathers Sr., Baylor will begin the 2015-16 season with one of the nation’s top front courts. However, head coach Scott Drew will have to work with one less option, as it was reported by the Waco Tribune that junior forward Jo Acuil will miss at least the next eight weeks of action.

During this time Acuil will undergo testing for a possible heart ailment, which leaves Baylor without a junior college transfer who was expected to help out in regards to both the depth and skill of the front court. The 7-footer from the Sudan averaged 20.1 points, 11.2 rebounds and 4.7 blocks per game as a sophomore at Neosho Community College.

“Jo’s health is of first and foremost importance,” Baylor coach Scott Drew said. “He had really improved this summer and fall, not only on the court but also in the weight room. He had progressed nicely.”

With Acuil sidelined Baylor’s tallest available player is redshirt sophomore Johnathan Motley, who’s only 6-foot-9. Motley was productive in his first season on the court, starting all 34 games and averaging 7.7 points, 4.2 rebounds and 1.4 blocks in 21.5 minutes of play per game.

You Make the Call: Was this a charge on Baylor’s Johnathan Motley?

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Baylor redshirt freshman forward Johnathan Motley threw down what could have been one of the more impressive dunks of the season in the first half of the Bears’ game against No. 12 Kansas Wednesday night. Only one problem: it didn’t count, as the officials ruled that Kansas forward Jamari Traylor successfully took the charge.

You make the call: was the call correct, or should it have been called a block on Traylor? I think they got this one right, which couldn’t be said for this charge called on Virginia’s Justin Anderson during the Cavaliers’ home win over NC State.