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Calhoun officially named head coach at DIII St. Joseph

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WEST HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Jim Calhoun has officially been named the head coach at Division III University of Saint Joseph in Connecticut.

The Hall of Famer had already announced he would be taking the job and has been working for a year to establish a men’s basketball program at the small Catholic university, which was an all-women’s school until this school year.

Calhoun also has continued to serve in an advisory role at UConn, where he served as coach for 26 seasons and led the Huskies to three of their four national titles before retiring in 2012.

The 76-year-old will return to the sidelines with a career record of 873-380 when the Blue Jays open the season on Nov. 9 against William Paterson University.

That game will be played at Trinity College in Hartford, which has a gym that seats about 2,200 people, about 1,000 more than the gymnasium at Saint Joseph.

Easier gambling has sports worried about fighting the fix

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OCEANPORT, N.J. (AP) — With dozens of states rushing to offer legal sports gambling in the wake of this spring’s landmark U.S. Supreme Court’ ruling, will fixed games — or parts of games — become more common?

The four major pro major sports leagues and the NCAA have argued for years in court that expanding legal betting will lead to more game-fixing. The pro leagues have sought, unsuccessfully so far, to get a cut of state gambling revenues to increase monitoring. Democratic U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York recently proposed legislation establishing federal guidelines aimed at “protecting the integrity of the game” as well as protecting bettors.

Supporters of legal sports betting say that bringing an already popular illegal activity out of the shadows will make it easier to detect illegal activity. They point to the Arizona State basketball point-shaving scandal in the late 1990s, uncovered after legal bookmakers in Las Vegas noticed unusually large sums wagered on Sun Devils games. Six people, including two players, pleaded guilty to crimes including conspiracy and sports bribery.

Legal sports betting has been part of the landscape for years outside the United States, as have gambling-related scandals.

Soccer, by far the most widely bet sport worldwide, has confronted widespread match-fixing scandals often orchestrated by organized crime groups. FIFA, the sport’s world governing body, estimated in 2013 that organized crime was taking in as much as $15 billion a year by fixing matches.

Perhaps equally as susceptible to fixing is tennis, with thousands of matches played annually at out-of-the-way venues featuring players on the sport’s lower rungs. A report published in April by an independent panel found “betting-related corruption and other breaches of integrity have taken firm root” in the sport. It cited a decision several years ago by pro tours to sell live scoring data, which allowed sports books to offer in-game wagering. During this month’s U.S. Open in New York, bettors were able to wager on who would win a specific point, match or set.

In the four months since the report was issued, several men’s players have been suspended, two for life, and authorities in Belgium detained more than a dozen people on suspicion of match-fixing as part of a criminal probe dating back to 2015.

The uncovering of illegal activity shows that legal betting safeguards are working, said Joe Asher, CEO of London-based bookmaker William Hill.

“The illegal bookie isn’t picking up the phone and calling the FBI, he’s just going to try to get on the same side of the bet,” Asher said. “That’s the difference between the black market and the legal market that exists today.”

Still, the prospect of easy, legal access to sports gambling for everyone, athletes included, has many concerned.

“They’re going to create a bigger pool for more kids, and for more money to get involved,” said Jamall Anderson, a running back on the 1996 Boston College football team whose players were found to have bet against their own team. “It’s really going to create a big mess, I think.”

Anderson recounted his experiences in a 2016 book, “The Best Bet.” In an interview, he described a culture in which gambling was part of the daily routine.

“You went to practice and you got your spreadsheet in the locker room,” he said. “It was nothing to sit there on the sidelines and say, ‘Who you got this week?’ That’s what you do.”

College athletes aren’t strangers to wagering: A 2016 NCAA survey of more than 22,000 college athletes found nearly one-quarter of male athletes violated NCAA rules by gambling money on sports in the previous year.

And of the male athletes who had gambled on sports, 13 percent had wagered on specific game situations with in-game bets.

NCAA rules prohibit athletes, coaches and other athletic employees from gambling on sports, and individual schools sometimes bring in law enforcement officials or former players to help them understand the rules.

Will it be enough as laws change?

“Do you remember back when you were 18 to 20 years of age?” asked Minnesota athletic director Bob Vecchione, head of the National Association of College Directors of Athletics. “When people told you something, how much did it sink in? That’s what causes some sleepless nights.”

With inside information heavily sought in gambling, any tidbit — say, a student telling friends that his roommate, the star quarterback, just had a fight with his girlfriend — can take on greater significance, highlighting the need for more education, Rutgers athletic director Patrick Hobbs said.

“We’ll educate on a variety of scenarios and hypotheticals, and say, ‘Hey look, this may have sounded like an innocent question in the past, but now you have to be careful with that information,'” Hobbs said.

In the Arizona State hoops case, Las Vegas bookmakers reported suspicious betting activity when gamblers wagered about $900,000 against Arizona State in an early season contest against Washington. The heavy action caused sports books to change Arizona State from a 10½-point favorite to a 3-point favorite.

“You might write $30,000 or $40,000 total on both sides of that game under normal conditions,” Jimmy Vaccaro, then-sports book director at Mirage Resorts, recently told The Associated Press. “We wrote $560,000 on that game. The people thought the fix was in and ended up blowing their money.”

Former Iowa State player, teammate stabbed in Romania

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BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — Two U.S. basketball players have been stabbed in a club in eastern Romania and one is in a serious condition, Romanian authorities said Sunday.

Police said Darrell Bowie, 24, and Joseph McClain, 25, who play for local club ACS Cuza Braila, were attacked Saturday night in the city after a fight broke out with locals.

Braila County Emergency Hospital spokeswoman Alina Neacsu told The Associated Press both men underwent emergency surgery at the hospital early Sunday. She said McClain sustained stab wounds to his chest and stomach and was “stable” and in intensive care. She said Bowie suffered multiple abdominal wounds, correcting reports that he had suffered a perforated lung. She said both had “perforated wounds” but could not say how they were caused.

Bowie was transported by helicopter on Sunday to the Emergency Hospital in the capital, Bucharest. “We are a small hospital and it was better for him to be transferred,” Neacsu said, adding that his condition is “unpredictable.”

A spokeswoman at the Bucharest hospital declined to provide information on Bowie’s medical status, citing patient privacy.

Police spokeswoman Laura Dan said prosecutors were investigating.

The club has 4 U.S. players for this season.

Bowie, who grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, spent three seasons at Northern Illinois before transferring to Iowa State for his final season. Bowie played in 33 games with nine starts for the Cyclones in 2016-17, averaging 5.8 points and 4.1 rebounds and helping them win the Big 12 Tournament and reach the round of 32 in the NCAA Tournament.

Former NBA guard and Georgia Tech great Kenny Anderson to coach NAIA program

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Former NBA all-star guard Kenny Anderson is taking over as the head coach at NAIA program Fisk University.

Fisk announced on its verified Twitter account Monday that Anderson had been hired to coach at the Nashville-based school.

The The 47-year-old Anderson played for several NBA teams from 1991-2005. He made the 1994 NBA All-Star Game while playing for the New Jersey Nets, who selected him with the No. 2 overall pick in the 1991 draft.

He posted career averages of 12.6 points and 6.1 assists.

Anderson also starred for Georgia Tech’s 1990 Final Four team, and scored 26 points per game en route to first-team All-American honors as a sophomore in 1991.

He becomes the second former NBA All-Star to get hired to coach a Tennessee-based college program this year. Anfernee “Penny” Hardaway was hired in March to coach at Memphis, where he played from 1991-93.

New charges for former North Carolina basketball player

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GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) — Police have filed charges against former NBA and University of North Carolina basketball player P.J. Hairston, the latest in legal problems dating back to his college career.

The News & Record of Greensboro reports Guilford County Chief Assistant District Attorney Howard Neumann said Friday the 25-year-old Hairston is charged with assault on a female, interfering with emergency communication and injury to personal property. Details aren’t available because arrest warrants haven’t been served.

In 2013, Hairston received a speeding ticket and a misdemeanor marijuana possession charge. Both times, officers stopped him as he drove rental vehicles linked to a Durham felon and party promoter.

Hairston played two seasons at North Carolina. He was drafted by the Miami Heat in 2014, and played for Charlotte and Memphis and was most recently with Houston’s G-League affiliate.

Iowa State’s Lard hopeful he’s turned career, life around

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AMES, Iowa (AP) — Cameron Lard would wake up, meditate and do yoga. That was followed by a trip to the gym, a meal, meetings, another meal and more meetings.

It was a boring but a clean summer for Lard — and far healthier than the self-described “double life” he led at Iowa State a year ago.

Lard spoke with reporters Thursday for the first time since rejoining the Cyclones after a stint over the summer at a wellness center.

His time away from the program followed a series of legal incidents that put his career in jeopardy. The 20-year-old sophomore forward from Natchitoches, Louisiana, was remarkably candid in describing the impact his stay at that center — and his new relationship with former NBA player and motivational speaker Chris Herren — have had on his life.

“My chances are limited right now. I can’t mess up again. That stays in the back of my head. I’ve got one more shot at it, and it probably won’t get better than this,” Lard said.

Lard had a drug paraphernalia charge dismissed during a pretrial hearing in April. He was stopped by Ames police on Feb. 4 for speeding, and an officer smelled marijuana coming from the car. Lard pleaded guilty to speeding. He was also cited for being underage at an Ames bar this offseason.

He admits he was “making really bad decisions. Probably hanging out with the wrong people that was influencing me.”

Lard said that he’s since found a strong support group and he is “very grateful” to have Herren, whose own promising basketball career was dogged by substance abuse, in his corner. Lard said he and Herren first got in touch with each other at the end of last season, and their relationship got stronger at the start of the summer.

Lard and Herren call or text each other 3-4 times a week, and the experiences the former Fresno State Bulldog and Boston Celtic shared with Lard seemed to have stuck with him.

“Chris once told me, ‘Do I want to lay my head on a soft pillow?’ He said his coach told him that when he transferred schools,” Lard said. “He never got the meaning of that until like, I think he said like a year ago. Now he’s not living a double life. He can lay his head on a real soft pillow and get some rest. I think about that almost every day.”

Lard isn’t in the clear with Iowa State just yet.

Coach Steve Prohm on Thursday wouldn’t commit to saying that Lard would be eligible when the Cyclones open the season on Nov. 6 against Alabama State. Prohm said he’ll decide whether or not to discipline Lard further based on his actions moving forward.

“It’s our job to continue to nurture him from the standpoint to where, when’s he’s faced with adversity, when he’s faced with tough moments, he can fight through those. That’s hopefully the biggest lesson he learned,” Prohm said.

If Lard has truly started to turn his life around, he’s got a chance to finish his career with the Cyclones as a star.

Despite all of his off-court struggles, the 6-foot-9 Lard scored 12.6 points and grabbed 8.1 rebounds a game a year ago. The 245-pound Lard is unusually strong and fast for his size, and his instincts also allowed Lard to break the school record for blocks by a freshman with 63.

But Lard is perilously close to having all go away — and nobody knows that better than he does.

“I’m not living a double life anymore. Everything is going good right now,” Lard said. “I understand that I’ve got a real good chance at what I’m doing here. I’m chasing my dreams.”