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Sunday’s betting lines, point spreads, over-unders

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Here is the full TV schedule, with spreads, over-unders and betting lines, for every game for final day of the first week of the NCAA tournament.

Detroit: Ian Eagle, Jim Spanarkel, Allie LaForce

  • 12:10 p.m.: No. 2 Purdue (-3.5) vs. No. 10 Butler, CBS (143.5)
  • 2:40 p.m.: No. 3 Michigan State (-9) vs. No. 11 Syracuse, CBS (129.5)

Charlotte: Jim Nantz, Grant Hill, Bill Raftery, Tracy Wolfson

  • 5:15 p.m.: No. 2 North Carolina (-6.5) vs. No. 7 Texas A&M, CBS (151.5)
  • 7:45 p.m.: No. 9 Kansas State -10) vs. No. 16 UMBC, CBS (135.5)

Nashville: Andrew Catalon, Steve Lappas, Jamie Erdahl

  • 6:10 p.m.: No. 2 Cincinnati (-8) vs. No. 7 Nevada, TNT (136.5)
  • 8:40: No. 1 Xavier (-5.5) vs. No. 9 Florida State, TNT (159)

San Diego: Carter Blackburn, Debbie Antonelli, John Schriffen

  • 7:10 p.m.: No. 4 Auburn (-1.5) vs. No. 5 Clemson, TBS (146.5)
  • 9:40 p.m.: No. 5 West Virginia (-12.5) vs. No. 13 Marshall, TBS (159.5)

 

Cameron Johnson ending his slump is big for No. 15 North Carolina

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When it comes to the long-term hopes of No. 15 North Carolina, not only to win the ACC but to also be a national title contender, the play of veterans Joel Berry II and Luke Maye will be critical.

Rated among the best in the country at their respective positions, Berry and Maye entered Tuesday’s game against No. 20 Clemson averaging a combined 35.6 points per game.

Yet it would be two other Tar Heels, Kenny Williams III and Cameron Johnson, who combined to do the damage that dropped the visiting Tigers to 0-59 all-time in Chapel Hill. North Carolina won 87-79, holding off a Clemson squad that shot 61.3 percent from the field in the second half due in large part to the work done in the first half.

While both Maye and Berry II were kept quiet in the first half, Williams (12 points) and Johnson (eight) combined to score 20 points in the stanza. Johnson would finish the game with 21 points, the most that the Pitt transfer has scored in a North Carolina uniform, and Williams would add 15 as Roy Williams’ team moved to 4-2 in ACC play.

Berry (17 points, four assists), Theo Pinson (12 points, seven rebounds, six assists) and Maye (11 points, four rebounds, five assists) all performed better in the second half, making it possible for the Tar Heels to hang on despite being challenged by a team that made ten of its first 11 second-half shots.

Williams and Johnson have proven themselves to be capable supplementary scorers this season, with the former averaging just over 12 points per game on the season and the latter at 9.7. But in the case of Johnson, following up his 2-for-10 effort in Saturday’s win over Notre Dame by shooting 7-for-10 from the field (6-for-9 3PT) is a needed bounce-back effort.

Prior to Tuesday night, Johnson reached double figures just once in the four games prior (14 vs. Boston College) and shot a combined 3-for-16 from three. Getting Johnson back on track is a big deal for North Carolina, and if his performance against Clemson can serve as a spark that would certainly bode well for the Tar Heels moving forward.

A productive Johnson affords Roy Williams the luxury of playing a “small” lineup in which Johnson mans the four and Maye the five. This North Carolina team isn’t like past editions in the Williams era, as many of those squads possessed the ability to have two “true” big men on the court at all times. With the big men lost from last year’s national title team, it’s been Maye carrying much of the load with freshmen Garrison Brooks and Sterling Manley both looking to work their way into the fold.

A consistent Johnson not only makes North Carolina better, but it’s also a necessity given the team’s available options.

As for Clemson, this game felt like one of the program’s best chances to finally pick up that elusive win in Chapel Hill. Brad Brownell’s group entered the game with a 15-2 record, and with the improvements both in the post (Elijah Thomas) and on the perimeter (Marquise Reed and Shelton Mitchell) this is a group that has some staying power.

But Reed, Mitchell and forward Donte Grantham got off to frigid starts, combining to score two points on 0-for-13 shooting from the field in the first half. Despite the first-half efforts of Thomas the hole was too deep to climb out of, with Clemson pulling to within two on multiple occasions in the second half. Reed got hot in the second stanza, finishing the game with 21 points, and Mitchell would add 18 points to the effort.

Now 1-1 halfway through an important four-game stretch — Notre Dame next, followed by a trip to Charlottesville to take on No. 2 Virginia — when it comes to their NCAA tournament seeding prospects, Clemson paid the price for its inability to knock down shots in the early going. But in their comeback, the Tigers put forth a performance along the lines of what they’ve managed to do for much of this season to date.

Unfortunately for Clemson, its supplementary scorers were unable to match the production of Cameron Johnson and Kenny Williams III.

No. 24 Florida State holds on to beat No. 12 North Carolina

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Having lost its ACC opener at No. 2 Duke, No. 24 Florida State entered Wednesday’s game against No. 12 North Carolina in need of a victory. Leonard Hamilton’s team got the job done, hanging on to beat the Tar Heels 81-80 to extend its home winning streak to 28 straight games. Also, the Seminoles ended a seven-game losing streak to North Carolina, with both teams now 1-1 in ACC play as a result.

Here are a couple thoughts on what happened in Tallahassee and how it will affect both teams moving forward.

1. Over-helping off of drivers cost North Carolina in the first half.

Florida State went into the locker room at the half with a 51-40 lead, with the 51 points being the most North Carolina has allowed in the first half of a game this season (previous high: 38). The Seminoles shot 54.5 percent from the floor overall and made nine of its 20 three-point attempts. Florida State certainly deserves credit for knocking down shots, but a big part of the problem for North Carolina was it showing too much respect to dribble penetration.

On multiple occasions such a move would result in Florida State having kick-out opportunities, which its shooters were able to take in rhythm. North Carolina improved in this regard in the second half, with Florida State shooting 2-for-9 from three and 41.7 percent from the field overall. Defending the three has been an issue for the Tar Heels for much of this season, and it was a big reason why they trailed by double digits at the half.

2. Balanced scoring will serve Florida State well in ACC play.

The big question for the Seminoles entering the season was who would pick up the slack offensively, given how much production was lost from last season’s team. Terrence Mann, who averaged 8.4 points per game last season, was the most obvious answer. He’s certainly been a factor this season, but the Seminoles have been able to account for the loss of the likes of Dwayne Bacon, Jonathan Isaac and Xavier Rathan-Mayes by way of their offensive balance and that was the case Wednesday night.

Three players scored at least 17 points, with Braian Angola leading the way with 20, C.J. Walker adding 18 and Mann 17. Trent Forrest chipped in with nine, and that balance was certainly a factor in the Seminoles’ ability to pull out the victory. Phil Cofer had an off night, scoring five points on 2-for-11 shooting, but he entered Wednesday averaging 14.5 points per game on a team with five players averaging at least 9.5 points per night.

There may not be a guy averaging 17 per night like Bacon did last season, but Florida State has enough talent to get the job done offensively. Scoring 93 at Duke and now 81 against North Carolina backs that up.

3. North Carolina’s ceiling will be determined by the consistency of Theo Pinson.

Joel Berry II racked up a game-high 28 points to lead three Tar Heels in double figures, with Kenny Williams adding 18 points and Luke Maye 14 in a losing effort. What Berry and Maye will provide offensively is pretty much known at this point, and Williams’ efforts coming off of a 13-point game against Wake Forest is a positive. But if North Carolina is to reach the heights scaled by the last two teams, Roy Williams is going to need consistency on the offensive end of the floor from Theo Pinson.

Thanks in part to injuries it feels as if we’ve been here for quite some time when it comes to Pinson: while the energy and effort he brings isn’t to be overlooked, by now shouldn’t he be a more consistent producer offensively? After scoring 19 points in the win over Ohio State the senior wing had eight against Wake Forest, and Wednesday night he scored five points on 2-for-6 shooting. Pinson’s certainly capable of being a double-digit scorer on occasion, as he’s done so four times this season, but North Carolina will need him to do so more often if they’re to make a run nationally.

4. Florida State’s late game decision-making left something to be desired.

Turnovers nearly did in the Seminoles especially late, when they made some suspect decisions with regards to passing the basketball. There was a home run attempt that sailed out of bounds, and there was also a cross-court pass picked off by Pinson that led to a Berry three-pointer to cut the deficit to one with 30 seconds remaining. Overall Florida State’s 15 turnovers were converted into 24 points by the Tar Heels, whose plus-12 advantage in points off turnovers made it possible for them to make a run and even take the lead in the second half.

Florida State was able to hang on, but that was a bit of a disappointment after the team did well in valuing the basketball in its loss at Duke. Given how tight the top of the ACC is likely to be, Florida State will need to make sure this was an anomaly — to be fair, they’ve been solid with regards to turnovers for much of this season — from a turnover standpoint.

Four-star 2018 guard Coby White commits to North Carolina

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With guards Jalek Felton and Andrew Platek having committed in their 2017 recruiting class, North Carolina received a commitment from one of the better guards in the Class of 2018 Thursday night. Four-star guard Coby White, who’s ranked 61st in his class by Rivals.com, made his pledge to Roy Williams’ program. News of White’s commitment was first reported by Scout.com.

The 6-foot-4 White is a native of Wilson, North Carolina, where he attends Greenfield HS, and he played his grassroots basketball for the CP3 16U basketball program this summer. His commitment to UNC comes just a couple days after the ACC school offered him a scholarship.

White took an unofficial visit to UNC in June, and his play in July ultimately led to the program making the aforementioned scholarship offer. By the time White enrolls in Chapel Hill, current veterans such as Joel Berry II and Nate Britt will be out of eligibility. Among the perimeter would could potentially be on campus in 2018 are freshmen Seventh Woods and Brandon Robinson, and sophomore Kenny Williams.

White is the second commit in the 2018 class for the Tar Heels, with 6-foot-7 guard Rechon Black being the first.

Five-star 2017 power forward trims list to eight

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One of the top prospects in the Class of 2017 announced on Monday that he’s trimmed his list down to eight schools. 6-foot-10 power forward Wendell Carter Jr., a native of Atlanta, revealed his final list Monday afternoon on Twitter with some of the nation’s best programs making the cut.

The final eight schools in the running for Carter’s commitment are Arizona, California, Duke, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Harvard, Kentucky and North Carolina.

The power forward position in the Class of 2017 is loaded, with Carter joining the likes of DeAndre Ayton and Mohamed Bamba at the head of the class. Seeing perennial powers on Carter’s list comes as no surprise given his skill level, with both in-state power conference programs still in the mix as well. The inclusion of Harvard may surprise some, but Carter’s performance in the classroom has opened that door for him should he choose to go that route.

Something else to keep in mind when it comes to Carter’s recruitment: how guard Gary Trent Jr. approaches his recruitment. It’s been reported in the past that the two friends are hoping to attend the same school. Whether or not that happens remains to be seen, as recruiting tends to be a fluid situation, but it is something to consider as Carter, Trent and the rest of this class makes its decisions as to where they’ll attend college.

Guard Platek becomes North Carolina’s second 2017 commit

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Monday afternoon North Carolina picked up a second verbal commitment in the Class of 2017, as shooting guard Andrew Platek announced via his Twitter account that he will play his college basketball for Roy Williams. One of the top perimeter shooters in the class, the 6-foot-4 Platek joins fellow guard Jalek Felton in North Carolina’s 2017 crop thus far.

A native of Guilderland, New York, Platek plays for the Albany City Rocks grassroots program and attends Northfield Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts. The recipient of many offers from high- and mid-major programs, Platek was offered a scholarship by North Carolina in late-April, with Williams making the phone call himself to deliver the news.

Outside of the now-graduated Marcus Paige perimeter shooting was an issue for North Carolina in recent years, but that’s been addressed on the recruiting front. Among the three signees in the 2016 class is shooting guard Brandon Robinson, who was one of the top shooters in that class, and Platek can also help in that regard when he arrives in Chapel Hill.

Among the other programs to offer Platek were Miami, Penn State and Stanford with Indiana showing some interest in the spring.