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VIDEO: Marvin Bagley III NBA Draft Prospect Profile

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Over the weekend, Pro Basketball Talk released the second in our NBA Draft Prospect Profile series, an in-depth breakdown of Duke star Marvin Bagley III.

In an era where versatility is king, the ‘tweeners’ of the world have become the most valuable and sought-after players in the NBA. Marvin Bagley III, however, is what a ‘tweener’ has become in the modern NBA. As the saying goes, you are the position you can guard, so what happens when a kid with superstar talent is a five on one end of the floor and a four on the other?

The video below is a full NBA Draft scouting report on Bagley, who will not fall out of the top four of June’s draft, and you can read our work over at PBT as well.

OTHER PROFILES

DEANDRE AYTON, Arizona
MARVIN BAGLEY III, Duke

NC Central receives NCAA probation for eligibility errors

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DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — The NCAA has placed North Carolina Central on probation for two years because of certification errors that allowed ineligible athletes to compete.

N.C. Central disclosed the penalties Wednesday, saying the NCAA determined the errors involved 22 athletes in seven sports — including football and men’s basketball — from 2012-15.

The school says it must vacate victories in the sports in which ineligible athletes participated, including men’s and women’s track and field, men’s and women’s cross country and baseball.

N.C. Central’s basketball team played in the NCAA tournament in 2014, 2017 and 2018.

“The improper certifications came from a single, but repeated, error of counting foundational courses toward student-athletes’ percentage-of-degree completion,” the NCAA’s infractions decision read. “Outdated degree auditing and academic advising systems were another factor that contributed to the violations. Additionally, the academic support and certification groups did not have enough staff to oversee the certification process. Because of the improper certifications, 22 student-athletes competed while ineligible. The university also did not withhold six of the student-athletes from competition before they were reinstated.”

School officials did not say how many wins would be vacated but say they plan to appeal.

The school said administrative errors in the certification process made the athletes ineligible, and the violations were determined to be unintentional.

N.C. Central’s probation runs through May 2020.

Mississippi officer fired after excessive force complaint by Utah State commit

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JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi police officer has been fired after being accused of using excessive force against a 19-year-old basketball player.

Interim Jackson Police Chief Anthony Moore said officer Vincent Lampkin was fired after an “extensive investigation,” and asked citizens not to judge the entire department by “one bad actor.”

John Knight III told authorities that the officer pulled him over in May and attacked him as he got out of his vehicle. He said the officer handcuffed and punched him, put a gun to his head, threw his phone into the grass when he asked to call his father, and then ultimately let him go without charges.

Knight, a standout point guard, was pulled over and beaten only a week after Utah State signed him to a scholarship.

Arizona has plenty of offseason work after tumultuous season

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TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Arizona went through one of the program’s most tumultuous seasons in 2017-18.

The Wildcats were ensnared in an FBI probe into recruiting before the season started, had a key player go down for a long stretch and were linked to the federal probe a second time late in the year.

Arizona still managed to win the Pac-12 tournament but the culmination of setbacks and distractions took a toll on the Wildcats once the NCAA Tournament started, leading to a surprising first-round exit.

Three players from that team were lost to graduation and three more are headed to the NBA, leaving the Wildcats with plenty of work to do this offseason if they’re going to remain among college basketball’s elite.

“Coming through this period of time isn’t always easy, but coming out on the other side, becoming bigger, stronger and better than ever, learning things and building our program. That’s what you talk about,” Arizona coach Sean Miller said Thursday. “It isn’t just pressing a reset button and doing things completely different. There’s a lot of things we’re very proud of that we wouldn’t change. There are a lot of things we have to improve on and that’s obviously on the leadership.”

Arizona’s last season hit a snag before it started. Assistant coach Emanuel Richardson was among 10 people arrested in September in a federal probe into shady recruiting practices, casting a dark cloud over the Wildcats.

Then Rawle Alkins broke his foot during preseason workouts and missed the first nine games. After an ugly trip to the Bahamas, the Wildcats pulled together and started winning games, remaining in the AP Top 25 most of the season.

Another bombshell dropped just before the Pac-12 tournament, when reports surfaced that Miller had been caught on an FBI wiretap discussing a $100,000 payment to lure a recruit to the school. Miller denied the report, kept his job and Arizona marched through the conference tournament, looking like one of the nation’s top teams headed into the NCAA Tournament.

Instead, the Wildcats stumbled in Boise, Idaho, succumbing to a barrage of baskets by Buffalo to lose in the first round.

“The totality of the season, beginning in the fall and getting to the Pac-12 Tournament took a toll on all of us,” Miller said. “I don’t know if we necessarily entered this year’s NCAA Tournament the most excited, eager, ready, happy as we could as a group.”

Dusan Ristic, Parker Jackson-Cartwright and Keanu Pinder graduated, then Deandre Ayton, Allonzo Trier and Alkins opted to leave early for the NBA.

Arizona appeared to be headed to a rebuilding season with the losses and a recruiting class that fell apart due to the FBI investigation.

The Wildcats lost top point guard Jahvon Quinerly shortly after Richardson’s arrest and Shaquille O’Neal’s son, Shareef, announced he was withdrawing his commitment to Arizona after the second round of allegations hit. Highly touted point guard Brandon Williams followed suit not long after, leaving the Wildcats’ recruiting cupboard bare.

Slowly, Miller started to rebuild his recruiting class, starting with Southern California guard Devonaire Doutrive. Belgian forward Omar Thielemans followed and Williams gave the class a big boost by recommitting to Arizona.

Arizona also will have Duke transfer Chase Jeter, an athletic 6-foot-10 forward who sat out last season, with graduate transfers Justin Coleman (Samford) and Ryan Luther (Pittsburgh).

They’ll join a roster that includes six returning players, led by Dylan Smith, Ira Lee, Brandon Randolph and Emmanuel Akot.

“Most of the teams we’ve had, the younger incoming talent is very important. Many of those guys came in the door ready to go,” Miller said. “Most of the time, the success starts with the returners. They improve from one year to the next, they’re the most experienced, they lead and create our culture for the guys who have never been here before.”

Arizona will have a different look next season from years past. With Kaleb Tarczewski, Ristic and Ayton, the Wildcats featured a big body in the middle to anchor their talented wing players.

In 2018-19, Miller plans to follow the mold created by Villanova coach Jay Wright the past few years by filling his roster with multi-talented, multi-dimensional wing players and guards. Villanova has won two of the past three national championships with a sort of positionless basketball and Arizona will have a similar style.

“The way of playing moving forward for us is to have more wings and guards on the court at the same time, to have more spacing and quick movement,” Miller said. “As you play with more skill and the ball moves and you spread out a little more, you can’t lose that second part, the rebounding.”

Villanova’s NBA exodus proves 2018 title team one of the most talented we’ve seen

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The most interesting conversation to have in regards to Villanova and the reigning champ’s NBA draft exodus is not how good they will be for the 2018-19 season but rather how good they were this past season, and why we never gave them the credit they deserved.

The winner of the 2018 national title was not only one of the best champs we’ve seen in the one-and-done era, but one of the most talented, despite the narrative that surrounded the program.

Let’s start with the obvious: There were essentially six guys that played the majority of the minutes in Villanova’s rotation last season: Jalen Brunson, Mikal Bridges, Donte DiVincenzo, Omari Spellman, Eric Paschall and Phil Booth, and while none of them elicit the kind of awe that comes with someone like Deandre Ayton or Anthony Davis, each and every one of them is a long way from the overlooked and under-recruited they were portrayed as.

Two of those six — Brunson and Spellman — were McDonald’s All-Americans and five-star prospects coming out of high school, and neither of them were in their first season on campus. Brunson was a junior while Spellman was a redshirt freshman. Bridges was a four-star prospect in the Class of 2014, ranked 81st by 247 sports with offers to programs like Florida, Xavier, Seton Hall and Virginia Tech. He was ranked six spots behind Booth in the class, who held offers from Georgetown, Maryland, Indiana and Xavier. DiVincenzo, like Bridges and Booth, was a four-star recruit ranked in the top 100 with offers to programs like Syracuse, Notre Dame and Pitt.

Paschall is the only guy from that group that wasn’t highly recruited coming out of high school, but after torching Atlantic 10 opponents as a freshman at Fordham, he picked Villanova over Kansas, Florida and Providence.

Everyone knew who they were. Many of the nation’s best programs wanted them.

What’s more is that each and every one of those players grew and developed within the Villanova program. Brunson was the National Player of the Year in 2018. Mikal Bridges was an all-american. DiVincenzo was the Final Four MOP despite coming off of the bench for that team. There is a very real chance that, on June 21st, the four players that declared for the draft will hear their names called in the first round; it would be surprising if any of the four made it past the top 40.

That doesn’t include Paschall — who, for my money, will be drafted next season and have an NBA career — or Booth — who scored 20 points in the title game when Villanova cut down the nets in 2016.

This wasn’t a roster made up of the cast of Hoosiers. Wright didn’t win a title with a bunch of walk-ons.

Villanova had dudes.

And those dudes, for the entirety of the 2017-18 season, were the best team in college basketball. When they were at full strength last season, they lost two games. One of those losses came at Butler, by eight points, on a night where the Bulldogs shot 15-for-22 from three. The other came at Creighton, in overtime, on a night where the Bluejays shot 12-for-29 from three. Both Paschall and Booth missed the loss to St. John’s. Booth missed the loss at Providence while it was Paschall’s first game back from a concussion.

Villanova did all that while posting the single-most efficient offense in KenPom’s database, scoring 1.227 points-per-possession, more than Lonzo Ball’s UCLA team, Frank Kaminsky’s Wisconsin teams and Doug McDermott’s Creighton teams.

Wright deserves all the credit in the world for identifying players that fit in with the culture that he wanted to build at Villanova, for convincing them to enroll at Villanova despite the fact that it might take them a year or two before they see the floor and then developing them into players that reached their full potential.

The point isn’t to minimize the job that he did; rather, it’s time that we need to start truly giving him the respect he deserves.

Villanova’s 2018 team was one of the greatest that we’ve ever seen because they played together, they bought in and, over time, they developed into a team chock-full of NBA talent.

And the proof will come when, in three weeks, four of them hear Adam Silver call their names.

CBT Podcast: Burner Twitters and NBA Draft Deadline Day

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The deadline for underclassmen testing the waters of the NBA draft to return to school came and went on Wednesday night, and to break down all the winners and losers from decision day Rob Dauster was joined by Sports Illustrated’s NBA draft expert Jeremy Woo. They worked through all the theories on Bryan Colangelo’s inability to control his family’s social media activity as well as what Tyus Battle’s return means, how much the Big Ten hierarchy changed in the last 24 hours and why we have never given Villanova enough credit for just how good they were.

The rundown:

OPEN: Burner accounts and Syracuse basketball

10:00: How will these decisions affect Kentucky’s team?

15:10: Kevin Huerter is gone and that’s a brutal blow for Maryland.

19:30: Everyone else in the Big Ten got good news.

24:50: Nevada is loaded with the Martin twins back in the mix.

29:05: Villanova theories, why they were underrated and what their prospects are without Donte DiVincenzo and Omari Spellman.