Robert Carter Jr.

AP Photo/Nick Wass

No. 6 Maryland holds off Michigan, 86-82

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COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) Robert Carter scored 17 points as sixth-ranked Maryland bounced back from consecutive losses with a 86-82 victory over Michigan on Sunday.

Jake Layman had 16 points, while Melo Trimble finished with 13 for Maryland (23-5, 11-4 Big Ten). Freshman Diamond Stone added 13 points after being suspended for the previous game by Maryland coach Mark Turgeon for a flagrant foul against Wisconsin.

Junior Mark Donnal went 10 of 13 from the field and had 25 points for Michigan (19-9, 9-6).

Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman had 16 points, Derrick Walton Jr. scored 14 and Zak Irvin had 11 points for the Wolverines, who went 13-27 from beyond the arc.

A careless inbound pass by Carter was stolen by Abdur-Rahkman, who made an uncontested easy layup and tied the game at 47 three minutes into the second half.

Maryland, however, regained control as Layman got hot beyond the mark. The senior hit a pair of 3-pointers and the Terrapins led 66-58 with 12 minutes remaining.

Donnal answered with six straight points and the Wolverines trailed 72-70, forcing Maryland to call timeout with 7:08 left. After another Terrapins’ turnover on the ensuing possession, Michigan then retook the lead on a layup and free throw by Abdur-Rahkman.

The Terrapins continued to battle through their mistakes. A dunk and layup by Carter provided a 78-75 lead with 3:29 remaining. From there, the Terrapins held on. Walton pushed off and fouled out with 18 seconds left, ending a key possession.

Rasheed Sulaimon then made a pair of three throws before Duncan Robinson answered with a 3-pointer to pull Michigan within 84-82 with 7 seconds left.

Trimble, though, made two free throws in the final seconds to seal the game.

Michigan won the prior matchup 70-67 on Jan. 12. This time, the Terrapins were in control early before the Wolverines took advantage of turnovers to get back in the game.

A 3-pointer and layup by Jaylen Brantley capped a 14-0 run and Maryland led 26-12 midway through the first half. Michigan was held without field goal for just over seven minutes before Walton converted a layup with 7:04 remaining.

The Wolverines, however, tightened their defense and a 3-pointer by Mark Donnal cut the margin to 35-30 during an 11-0 run. Michigan scored 15 points off 12 Maryland turnovers and trailed 41-36 at the break.

TIP-INS

Michigan: Caris LeVert missed his second consecutive game with a lower left leg injury. He has missed 13 games this season and the Wolverines are 7-6 without him in the lineup.

Maryland: Melo Trimble entered the game having made just seven of his past 38 field-goal attempts (18.4 percent) . The sophomore went 3 of 10 from the field but had 7 turnovers against the Wolverines.

UP NEXT

Michigan hosts Northwestern on Wednesday.

Maryland travels to No. 17 Purdue on Saturday.

No. 4 Maryland refocuses, slows down No. 18 Purdue

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky
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No. 18 Purdue and No. 4 Maryland exchanged leads for most of the first 33 minutes before the Boilermakers scored five straight points on layups by Rapheal Davis (who was fouled on his make) and Caleb Swanigan. Purdue was getting the touches it wanted around the basket, and Mark Turgeon’s Terrapins weren’t doing a whole lot to keep it from happening either.

Turgeon called a timeout to get his team back in sync defensively, and as a result Maryland went on a 9-0 run that ultimately led to their winning by the final score of 72-61.

Maryland’s big men, Robert Carter Jr. and Diamond Stone, did a much better job down the stretch of keeping Purdue from getting the ball inside to senior center A.J. Hammons. Hammons finished the game with 18 points and ten rebounds, but only two of those points came after Maryland’s 9-0 second half run. But keeping the ball from getting inside is just as much about the players defending the passers as it is keeping the big(s) from getting to his preferred spot.

Defensively Maryland took away the passing angles and essentially made Purdue’s guards make plays, something they’ve struggled with at times this season. That led to far too many perimeter shots for Purdue, which shot 3-for-23 on the day from beyond the arc. Add in the fact that they attempted just five free throws as a team, making two, and areas in which the Boilermakers can benefit went neglected in College Park.

By comparison Maryland was able to make a habit of going to the foul line, shooting 24-for-27 from the charity stripe with Rasheed Sulaimon and Melo Trimble combining to go 17-for-19 on the day. The foul line helped Trimble make up for an off day from the field, as he shot 2-for-12, but the sophomore’s ability to work off of ball screens ultimately opened things up for Maryland even with his shots not falling.

Add in the fact that Sulaimon (21 points, ten rebounds) and Carter (19 points, seven rebounds) were able to pick up the slack, with Diamond Stone adding 12 points and six rebounds, and it’s easy to see why Maryland was able to turn things around down the stretch.

Maryland’s been a good defensive team this season, but they got away from that for a significant portion of Saturday’s game. A key timeout to get the team refocused paid off, the the Terrapins defending at a level that made it incredibly difficult for Purdue to get anything going. And as a result, Maryland remains within a game of leaders Iowa and Indiana in the Big Ten title race.

No. 8 Maryland lands first marquee win over No. 3 Iowa

(AP Photo/Gail Burton)
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COLLEGE PARK, Maryland — For a team with legitimate national title aspirations and a shot to win the Big Ten regular season title, it may surprise folks that haven’t been paying attention that Maryland was a No. 3 seed in the latest NBCSports.com bracket projection.

And prior to Thursday night, there were projections that slotted the Terps as a No. 4 or No. 5 seed.

That’s what happens when it’s January 28th and your best win is over … a disappointing UConn team? A Georgetown team that lost to Radford, UNC Asheville and Monmouth? The worst Wisconsin team in more than 15 years? Believe it or not, their best RPI win as No. 3 Iowa rolled into town was against Princeton, who was slotted in at 60th.

And that is what made this result so important, as the No. 8 Terps knocked off the Hawkeyes on Thursday night, 70-64, giving them their first marquee win of the season against what may be the last elite opponent they play before March. The Terps really don’t have that many more opportunities for quality wins left on their schedule. They get Purdue twice. They play at Indiana. There’s a game against Michigan and the Big Ten tournament. That’s about it.

So this win in and of itself is key for seeding if nothing else, regardless of whether or not head coach Mark Turgeon believes it.

“It’s the first [game against a ranked opponent] at home,” Turgeon said. “It’s hard on the road against ranked opponents. It kind of made me mad when people were talking that way.”

Turgeon will have less reason to be mad tonight, but the fact of the matter here is that the win itself matters far less than the manner in which the Terps landed this win.

They did it without Melo Trimble.

Not without him without him. He played. He was on the floor for his usual 35 minutes. He just was more or less a non-factor.

Trimble, in case you’ve been sleeping under a football-shaped log for the last two months, is Maryland’s star. He’s the guy that hit the game-winning three at Wisconsin, the guy that has found his name somewhere near the top of every National Player of the Year list that you should be paying attention. He’s been dubbed by your’s truly as the best Big Shot Maker in college basketball, and he is the biggest reason that the Terps are now 17-2 in games decided by six points or less in his two seasons in College Park.

And on Thursday night, Melo finished with 11 points and three assists, shooting just 2-for-7 from the floor and, perhaps most surprisingly, getting to the free throw line exactly zero times before there were 17.4 seconds left on the clock. Five of his 11 points came in those final 17.4 seconds when the game was essentially decided. He didn’t score in the second until those free throws and took just three shots in the final 20 minutes.

Head coach Mark Turgeon didn’t even put the rock in Trimble’s hand on the biggest possession of the game. He used him as a decoy, sliding him on the weak side of the floor to draw the help defender as Jake Layman floated a lob pass over a fronting post defender for a Diamond Stone layup that made it 64-60 with a little more than a minute left.

Didn’t matter.

Rasheed Sulaimon and Robert Carter Jr. both finished with 17 points and the Terps left the Xfinity Center with the 70-64 win.

And therein lies the most confounding thing about this Maryland team.

On paper, they’re may be the most talented team in the country, and I don’t say that lightly. Trimble is an all-american, and when Sulaimon is playing well, he gives the Terps what may be the best back court in college basketball. Diamond Stone is a soon-to-be lottery pick, Jake Layman could end up getting drafted and Robert Carter Jr. may actually be the team’s most well-rounded player.

“It’s really impressive when you look at the talent level. The size, the versatility, I think that’s what makes Maryland so tough,” Iowa head coach Fran McCaffery said. “Carter’s a handful, Stone is so good. Sulaimon and Trimble are so quick off the dribble, it’s hard to contain them.”

“We know what we have and we know what our potential could be,” Sulaimon said.

Why, then, is this team so inconsistent? Nine days earlier, in the same building that the Terps beat the hottest team in college basketball, the Terps were taken to overtime by Northwestern. They needed to come back from down 13 points with seven minutes left to beat Penn State right here in College Park. It’s been a consistent thing this year. They struggled with Rider early in the year. They struggled with Illinois State.

And the answer may actually be their savior.

Trimble is one of the five best point guards in college basketball. I’m not sure there is anyone in the country that would tell you otherwise. But the knock on Trimble is that he can be too ball-dominant at times. When the offense gets bogged, often times it turns into — or it is the direct result off — The Melo Show. The ball sticks in his hands. He dribbles out the clock, waiting for a chance to attack in isolation or a ball-screen action.

That was just fine last year, when Trimble’s supporting cast wasn’t as good as this year’s squad.

But now he may be sharing the court with four other NBA players.

When the ball moves, it gets other guys involved. Sulaimon got into a rhythm shooting the ball early and that opened up lanes for him to penetrate. “He does such a good job of finishing, especially going to his right, but he’s a tough guard because he can shoot it too,” Iowa point guard Mike Gesell said. “He’s very good for that team. He really got it going tonight.”

Iowa’s inability to guard Sulaimon and Trimble in man-to-man forced them into their 2-3 zone, which Carter feasted on. “He went to work in there,” McCaffery said.

The key was that they weren’t just finishing off plays. That duo finished with 22 shot attempts and nine assists. They weren’t just involved in the offense. They were creating it.

That’s what it’s going to take for Maryland to reach their ceiling.

And when they do, they have the pieces needed to beat anyone in the country, to win a national title. Tonight was evidence of that.

“We beat a really good basketball team tonight,” Turgeon said. “They are probably one of, if not the best team, right now, in college basketball. And we were able to beat them.”

And doing so with Trimble playing a minimal role down the stretch to boot.

“That’s a good sign for us.”