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Re-ranking the 2008 recruiting class

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July’s live recruiting period, the last of its kind, just finished up, meaning that the Class of 2019 have fully had a chance to prove themselves to the recruiters and the recruitniks around the country.

Scholarships were earned and rankings were justified over the course of those three weekends, but scholarship offers and rankings don’t always tell us who the best players in a given class will end up being.

Ask Steph Curry.

Over the course of the coming weeks, we will be re-ranking eight recruiting classes, from 2007-2014, based on what they have done throughout their post-high school career.

Here are the 25 best players from the Class of 2008, with their final Rivals Top 150 ranking in parentheses:

Draymond Green (Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)

1. PAUL GEORGE (UR)

George was considered to be a three-star prospect out of high school, ultimately deciding to play his college basketball at Fresno State. In two seasons at the school George averaged 15.5 points, 6.7 rebounds, 2.4 assists and 2.0 steals per game, and would go on to be selected by the Pacers with the tenth overall pick in the 2010 NBA Draft.

As a pro George has earned five All-Star Game appearances (most among 2008 prospects) while also being a four-time All-NBA and three-time All-Defensive team selection. George’s first All-Star Game appearance came in a season in which he was also named the NBA’s Most Improved Player (2012-13). Considered to be one of the top all-around players in the NBA, George has career averages of 18.6 points, 6.2 rebounds and 3.2 assists per game.

2. DAMIAN LILLARD (UR)

Like George, Lillard was also a prospect who was unable to crack the final Rivals Top 150 rankings for the Class of 2008. And like George, Lillard landed at a school — Weber State — where he would have ample opportunities to shine. He did just that, averaging 18.6 points, 4.3 rebounds and 3.5 assists per game in three-plus seasons at Weber State.

A two-time Big Sky Player of the Year, Lillard would be selected by Portland with the sixth overall pick in the 2012 NBA Draft. Lillard, the 2013 NBA Rookie of the Year, is a three-time All Star selection and has also made three All-NBA teams during his time with the Trail Blazers.

3. DRAYMOND GREEN (122)

Green is the highest-ranked player on this list who spent four years in college, and during his time at Michigan State he developed into one of college basketball’s most versatile players. In addition to being a Consensus All-American as a senior Green was also Big Ten Player of the Year, averaging 16.2 points, 10.6 rebounds and 3.8 assists per game.

Yet that wasn’t enough to land Green in the first round of the 2012 NBA Draft, with Golden State selecting him with the 35th overall pick. It’s safe to say that the Warriors got an absolute steal in Green, whose versatility offensively has translated to the NBA and he’s also one of the league’s best defenders. The 2017 NBA Defensive Player of the Year (and three-time All Defensive Team selection), Green has made three All-Star Game appearances and is also a two-time All-NBA selection.

DeMar DeRozan (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

4. DEMAR DEROZAN (3)

DeRozan remained close to home for his college career, making the short trek from Compton to play one season at USC. In his lone season as a Trojan, DeRozan averaged 13.9 points and 5.7 rebounds per game before being selected by Toronto with the ninth overall pick in the 2009 NBA Draft.

His nine seasons with the Raptors were quite successful, with DeRozan helping to turn the team into a perennial factor in the East and earning four All-Star game appearances in the process. Also a two-time All-NBA selection, DeRozan averaged 19.7 points, 4.1 rebounds and 3.1 assists per game as a Raptor before being traded to San Antonio earlier this summer.

5. KEMBA WALKER (14)

Of the players on this list it can be argued that Walker’s collegiate career was the most successful. Two seasons after contributing as a reserve on UConn’s 2009 Final Four team Walker led the Huskies on a remarkable postseason run, winning five games in five days to take the Big East tournament and then going on to win the national title.

As a junior Walker was a Consensus All-American and national player of the year candidate, and he would go on to be selected by Charlotte with the ninth pick in the 2011 NBA Draft. Walker’s NBA career has been a success as well, with the point guard being an All Star each of the last two seasons and averaging 18.9 points, 5.7 assists and 3.4 rebounds per game.

6. KLAY THOMPSON (51)

After a high school career that saw Thompson land just outside of the Top 50 he headed north to play three seasons at Washington State. During his time on the Palouse Thompson averaged 17.9 points and 4.2 rebounds per game, which includes a junior season in which he accounted for 21.6 points per game and shot nearly 40 percent from three.

Thompson’s production was good enough to see him get drafted by Golden State with the 11th overall pick in the 2011 NBA Draft, and since then he’s developed into a player who will likely (when his career ends) go down as one of the best three-point shooters in NBA history. Thompson’s been an All-Star selection each of the last four seasons, and in addition to being a key contributor on three NBA champion teams he’s also a two-time All-NBA selection.

7. ISAIAH THOMAS (92)

After finishing his high school career at South Kent Prep, Thomas would spend three seasons at Washington and average 16.4 points, 4.0 assists and 3.5 rebounds per game. Thomas would develop into one of the top guards in the Pac-10 during his time in Seattle, but the production wasn’t good enough to convince most NBA teams to take a chance on him come draft day. Sacramento selected Thomas with the last pick of the 2011 NBA Draft, and he wound up averaging 11.5 points per game as a rookie.

After three seasons with the Kings Thomas would agree to a deal with Phoenix, which traded him to Boston less than a season into that contract. It would be in Boston where Thomas had his greatest success, earning two All-Star Game appearances and averaging 24.7 points and 6.0 assists per game. Thomas suffered a hip injury during Boston’s run to the 2017 Eastern Conference Finals, and during that offseason Boston traded him to Cleveland. Thomas spent last season with the Cavaliers and Lakers, with the hip injury keeping him off the court for significant stretches. Now healthy, Thomas agreed to a one-year deal with Denver earlier this summer.

8. GORDON HAYWARD (UR)

Hayward, who fell outside of Rivals’ Top 150, was also an accomplished tennis player in high school. He would sign on to play for Brad Stevens at Butler, and few could have predicted that his collegiate career would last just two seasons. After a solid freshman campaign Hayward was named Horizon League Player of the Year as a sophomore, a season in which he helped lead the Bulldogs to the first of two consecutive national title game appearances and averaged 15.5 points and 8.2 rebounds per game.

Hayward would be selected by Utah with the ninth pick in the 2010 NBA Draft, and in seven seasons with the Jazz he would average 15.7 points, 4.2 rebounds and 3.4 assists per game. Hayward made the move to Boston last summer but saw his 2017-18 season come to an end just minutes into the season opener due to a horrific leg/ankle injury.

Gordon Hayward and Shelvin Mack (Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images)

9. JRUE HOLIDAY (2)

Much was expected of Holiday when he arrived at UCLA, where he averaged 8.5 points, 3.8 rebounds and 3.7 assists per game during his lone season as a Bruin. It could be argued that in Holiday’s case the NBA game was a better fit for him, and despite those number he was still taken by Philadelphia with the 17th overall pick in the 2009 NBA Draft. Holiday’s four seasons in Philadelphia were solid, with the guard earning his first All-Star Game appearance in 2013.

After joining New Orleans as a free agent in 2013 Holiday struggled to stay healthy, playing in a total of 74 games the next two seasons. The more Holiday’s been on the court the better he’s been, with the 2017-18 season being the best of his career to date. Holiday had an impact on both ends of the court last season, averaging 19.0 points, 6.0 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.5 steals per game, earning the first All-Defensive team selection of his career.

10. TYREKE EVANS (6)

The versatile Evans was entrusted with running the show for what would turn out to be John Calipari’s final team at Memphis, averaging 17.1 points, 5.4 rebounds and 3.9 assists per game. As a result Evans won the Wayman Tisdale Award, which is given to the nation’s top freshman by the USBWA. That Memphis team reached the Sweet 16, and it came as no surprise that Evans was off to the NBA once that season ended.

Selected by Sacramento with the fourth overall pick in the 2009 NBA Draft, Evans averaged 20.1 points, 5.8 assists and 5.3 rebounds per game as a rookie. For his career Evans, who averaged 19.4 points, 5.2 assists and 5.1 rebounds per game in Memphis last season, is accounting for 16.5 points, 5.1 assists and 4.8 rebounds per night. Evans signed with the Pacers as a free agent earlier this summer.

11. REGGIE JACKSON (115)

Jackson spent three seasons at Boston College, where as a junior he averaged 18.2 points, 4.5 assists and 4.3 rebounds per game. One of the ACC’s best guards that season, Jackson would enter the 2011 NBA Draft and be selected with the 24th overall pick by Oklahoma City. Jackson spent three-plus seasons with the Thunder, spending the majority of his time there as Russell Westbrook’s backup.

Looking for a starting role Jackson was traded to Detroit during the 2014-15 season, where he’s been ever since. As a Piston Jackson is averaging 16.6 points, 6.1 assists and 3.0 rebounds per game, but injuries have limited him to 52 and 45 games over the last two seasons.

12. NIKOLA VUCEVIC (UR)

Vucevic flying under the radar from a rankings standpoint isn’t a huge surprise, as he played just one year of high school basketball in the United States. After a season at Stoneridge Prep it was off to USC, where Vucevic played three seasons and as a junior averaged 17.1 points and 10.3 rebounds per game. Drafted 16th overall by the 76ers in the 2011 NBA Draft, Vucevic played one season in Philadelphia before being included in a four-team trade that sent him to Orlando. In six seasons with the Magic, Vucevic is averaging 16.0 points and 10.4 rebounds per game.

13. MARCUS MORRIS (29)

At both Kansas and in the NBA Marcus Morris has produced slightly better numbers than twin Markieff, and as a junior he earned Big 12 Player of the Year honors. After averaging 17.2 points and 7.6 rebounds per game Morris was selected by Houston with the 14th overall pick in the 2011 NBA Draft. Morris spent just over a year with the Rockets before being traded to Phoenix, and he’s also played for Detroit and Boston during his NBA career. Last season Morris averaged 13.6 points and 5.4 rebounds per game in 54 appearances for the Celtics.

Marcus and Markieff Morris (Rob Carr/Getty Images)

14. MARKIEFF MORRIS (49)

While Markieff’s college numbers weren’t as good as his brother’s, he did manage to be picked one spot higher in the 2011 NBA Draft. After averaging 13.6 points and 8.3 rebounds per game as a junior Markieff was selected by Phoenix with the 13th pick, and the brothers would be reunited during their second season in the NBA. Morris would remain in Phoenix until the 2015-16 season, when he was traded to Washington. Morris has been a solid member of the Wizards rotation since his arrival, averaging 11.5 points and 5.6 rebounds per game last season.

15. GREG MONROE (8)

The New Orleans native spent two seasons at Georgetown, averaging 14.5 points, 8.2 rebounds and 3.2 assists per game as a collegian. After that it was off to the NBA, with Monroe being drafted by the Pistons with the seventh overall pick in the 2010 NBA Draft. An All-Rookie Team selection in 2011, Monroe has produced solid numbers during his NBA career with averages of 13.7 points and 8.6 rebounds per game. After spending time last season with Milwaukee, Phoenix and Boston, Monroe will reportedly sign with Toronto as a free agent.

16. BRANDON JENNINGS (4)

Jennings took what was, at the time, the road less traveled to the NBA as he played a season in Italy prior to entering the 2009 NBA Draft. A one-time Arizona commit, Jennings was selected tenth overall in that draft by Milwaukee, where he spent four seasons and was an All-Rookie Team selection in 2010. Since his first stint in Milwaukee Jennings has played for five teams, and that includes a late-season run with the Bucks last year after a productive stint in China. For his NBA career Jennings, who’s a free agent, is averaging 14.1 points and 5.7 assists per game.

17. IMAN SHUMPERT (39)

Shumpert’s three-year career at Georgia Tech was a very good one, and as a junior he became the seventh player in ACC history to lead his team in points, rebounds and assists. After averaging 17.3 points, 5.9 rebounds and 3.5 assists per game it was off to the NBA for Shumpert, who was selected by the Knicks with the 17th overall pick in the 2011 NBA Draft.

Shumpert’s been more of a defensive stopper in the NBA, and after receiving a reprieve in the form of his being traded to Cleveland during the 2014-15 season the following year he would win an NBA title. Shumpert was traded to Sacramento last season but did not appear in a game for the Kings due to plantar fasciitis in his left foot.

18. AL-FAROUQ AMINU (7)

Aminu spent two seasons at Wake Forest before turning pro. Aminu averaged 15.8 points and 10.7 rebounds per game as a sophomore, which was good enough to get him selected by the Clippers with the eighth overall pick in the 2010 NBA Draft. Aminu’s played for four different teams, with his best run coming as a member of the Portland Trail Blazers. Aminu’s defensive versatility has made him a valuable member of the Portland rotation, and last season he averaged 9.3 points and 7.6 rebounds per game.

19. ED DAVIS (15)

After serving as a reserve on North Carolina’s 2009 national title team as a freshman, Davis averaged 13.4 points, 9.6 rebounds and 2.8 blocks per game as a sophomore. And with that Davis was off to the NBA, going 13th overall to Toronto in the 2010 NBA Draft. A rotation big man who’s played with five different NBA teams, Davis boasts career averages of 6.6 points and 6.5 rebounds per game. Next season Davis will be playing for a sixth NBA team, as he agreed to a deal with the Nets earlier this summer.

20. SHELVIN MACK (UR)

Mack played in back-to-back national title games with the Butler Bulldogs before getting drafted in the second round of the 2011 NBA Draft. He’s since bounced around the league, but he’s managed to put together a career that spans seven years to date.

21. WILLIAM BUFORD (19)

A McDonald’s All-American out of Libbey HS in Toledo, Buford finished his Ohio State career as one of the program’s top scorers. Over the course of four seasons Buford averaged 13.7 points and 4.6 rebounds per game, finishing with 1,990 career points. The Big Ten Freshman of the Year in 2009, Buford earned third team all-conference honors as a sophomore and second team as both a junior and senior. Undrafted, Buford spent the early stages of his professional career in the G-League before playing the last two seasons in Europe.

22. KYLE O’QUINN (UR)

O’Quinn was an unheralded recruit out of high school, ultimately becoming the focal point of a Norfolk State program that would pull off one of the biggest upsets in NCAA tournament history during his senior season. In four years at Norfolk State O’Quinn averaged 12.5 points and 8.5 rebounds per game, winning MEAC Player of the Year as a senior. And he would lead the 15-seed Spartans to an upset win over Missouri in the first round of the 2012 NCAA tournament. Drafted by Orlando with the 49th overall pick in the 2012 NBA Draft, O’Quinn has been a rotation big in the NBA and has career averages of 5.8 points and 4.9 rebounds per game.

22. TREY THOMPKINS (30)

Thompkins may not have spent much time in the NBA, appearing in 24 games for the Clippers during the 2011-12 season, but that shouldn’t lead to what he accomplished in college being ignored. An SEC All-Freshman Team selection in 2009, Thompkins was a first team all-conference choice in each of his final two seasons at Georgia. For his career Thompkins, who was selected by the Clippers with the 37th overall pick in the 2011 NBA Draft, averaged 15.7 points, 7.8 rebounds and 1.3 blocks per game. Thompkins has experienced success playing overseas, most recently playing for Real Madrid in the Spanish ACB.

23. TU HOLLOWAY (100)

Holloway’s four year career at Xavier was a highly productive one, as he was a two-time first team All-Atlantic 10 selection and the conference’s Player of the Year in 2011. During Holloway’s junior season, in which he averaged 19.7 points, 5.4 assists and 5.0 rebounds per game, he was also a third team AP All-American. While Holloway was not drafted in 2012 he has enjoyed a successful career overseas, most recently signing with Istanbul BB for the 2018-19 season.

24. TYLER ZELLER (33)

Zeller’s freshman season at North Carolina was capped by a national title, and by the time his UNC career was complete the 7-footer managed to earn ACC Player of the Year and consensus All-America honors as a senior. As a senior Zeller averaged 16.3 points and 9.6 rebounds per game, shooting 55.3 percent from the field. Drafted by Dallas with the 17th overall pick in the 2012 NBA Draft, Zeller’s played for four teams and is averaging 7.0 points and 4.4 rebounds per game.

25. ANDREW NICHOLSON (UR)

If you happen to wonder why the aforementioned Holloway didn’t win Atlantic 10 Player of the Year as a senior, Nicholson would be the reason why. During a senior season in which he averaged 18.5 points, 8.4 rebounds and 2.0 blocks per game, not only was Nicholson the A-10 Player of the Year but he was also the league’s Defensive Player of the Year and an Honorable Mention All-American. In four seasons at St. Bonaventure, Nicholson averaged 17.1 points, 7.2 rebounds and 2.0 blocks per game, which led to he being selected by Orlando with the 19th pick in the 2012 NBA Draft. Nicholson, who played in China last season, averaged 6.0 points and 3.0 rebounds per game in five NBA seasons for the Magic, Wizards and Nets.

Byron Mullens (Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

FIVE NOTABLES THAT DIDN’T MAKE THE TOP 25

BRYON MULLENS (1)

Mullens, the top prospect in the Class of 2008, played just one season at Ohio State and only two of his 33 appearances were starts. After averaging 8.8 points and 4.7 rebounds per game Mullens went pro, with the Mavericks taking him 24th overall in the 2009 NBA Draft. Mullens averaged 7.4 points and 4.2 rebounds per game in the NBA, playing for four teams over the course of five seasons.

WILLIE WARREN (10)

Warren was productive in his two seasons at Oklahoma, averaging 15.2 points and 3.5 assists per game, but that did not translate to the NBA. Drafted 54th overall by the Clippers in the 2010 NBA Draft, Warren appeared in 19 games as a rookie and averaged 1.9 points per game. Warren most recently played professionally in the G-League for the Texas Legends.

JAMYCHAL GREEN (21)

Green was a two-time All-SEC selection during his time at Alabama, landing on the first team as a junior and getting a second team nod as a senior. In four seasons Green, who would go undrafted, averaged 13.5 points and 7.4 rebounds per game. Despite not hearing his name called on draft night Green has managed to carve out a solid NBA career for himself, making his debut during the 2014-15 season and averaging 10.3 points and 8.4 rebounds per game (both career highs) for Memphis last season.

LUKE BABBITT (31)

Babbitt enjoyed a very good two-year run at Nevada, winning WAC Player of the Year honors after averaging 21.9 points and 8.9 rebounds per game as a sophomore. Selected by Minnesota with the 16th overall pick in the 2010 NBA Draft, Babbitt was traded to Portland on draft night and would spend his first three NBA seasons with the Trail Blazers. Babbitt, who’s averaging 4.8 points and 2.2 rebounds per game for his career, has since played for the Pelicans, Heat (two stints) and Hawks.

MARCUS DENMON (150)

After serving as a reserve in each of his first two seasons at Missouri, Denmon moved into a starring role as an upperclassman and earned first team All-Big 12 honors as both a junior and a senior. Averaging 17.7 points, 5.0 rebounds and 2.1 assists per game as a senior, Denmon was also a consensus second team All-American. Selected by the Spurs with the 59th overall pick in the 2012 NBA Draft Denmon has not appeared in an NBA game, instead plying his trade overseas.

VIDEO: Memphis had some laughably bad flops against Tennessee

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The highlight of No. 3 Tennessee’s win at Memphis on Saturday wasn’t the win itself or a Memphis fan deciding he needed to find some relief behind a concession stand.

It was the laughably bad flopping efforts by the Memphis guards:

Actually, let me take that back.

What is actually laughably bad here is that two of these flops were actually called as offensive fouls.

Seriously, watch that first clip and explain to me how a referee standing ten feet away can possibly believe that was a real foul.

Player of the Year Power Rankings: Zion Williamson reigns again

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1. ZION WILLIAMSON, Duke

Nothing has changed with Zion since last week as Duke has yet to play since the last time we rolled out these rankings. We will, however, get a better sense of what he is able to do come Thursday, when the Blue Devils take on No. 11 Texas Tech, the only team in college basketball that has yet to allow more than 1.0 points-per-possession to a team this season.

2. ETHAN HAPP, Wisconsin

The only game that the Badgers played last week was against Savannah State, and Happ finished with 18 points, 11 boards and six assists. The only reason this is relevant is because is bumped Happ up to averaging 5.0 assists on the season, so I can now say that he’s averaging 19 points, 10 boards and five assists. Not bad.

3. R.J. BARRETT, Duke

Ditto, Zion Williamson.

4. GRANT WILLIAMS, Tennessee

I asked around about Grant Williams this week, talking to a few coaches that have scouted or game-planned for him, to try and get a sense for what makes this undersized four-man so good this year. Some mentioned the fact that his long arms make him bigger than he is. Others mentioned his sneaky-athleticism, and that he’s able to step out on the perimeter and be a threat more this year than in the pass.

But one thing that I did hear was how good Williams is as a high-low passer and how well Rick Barnes is able to incorporate this into the offense that the Vols run. The advantage here is that Williams is able to pull a bigger player away from the rim, particularly since he is now effective shooting from beyond the arc. It also allows Rick Barnes to attack matchups, particularly when Admiral Schofield is on the floor. Schofield is 6-foot-5 but is built like a wrestler while also being able to elevate over most defenders. The third clip in the video below shows a perfect example of Williams pulling size out of the paint to allow Schofield to post-up a smaller Zach Norvell Jr.:

5. RUI HACHIMURA, Gonzaga

One thing that I have touched on over and over again is that Rui Hachimura is not a great defender on the perimeter. According to Synergy, he’s allowed 25 points in 23 possessions where he was isolated defensively, and the 1.087 points-per-possession that he has allowed is good for the 14th percentile nationally.

It has gotten to the point that opposing offenses target the matchup with Hachimura. Mark Few has been mixing up his defenses this season, but one of the things that he does quite a bit is to switch everything on the perimeter, and when he does, opponents have had a tendency to create those switches until they get the matchup they want: Hachimura guarding a ball-handler on the perimeter. The last three clips in the video below show that happening:

6. DE’ANDRE HUNTER, Virginia

Hunter had one of his worst games of the season the last time we saw the Wahoos play, but that was last Sunday. UVA is at South Carolina this week.

7. JARRETT CULVER, Texas Tech

Texas Tech has looked really good this season. They’ve also played Nebraska, USC and Memphis … and that’s basically it. We’ll be able to better have this conversation on Friday morning, after the Red Raiders get Duke in Madison Square Garden.

8. DEDRIC LAWSON, Kansas

Lawson was awesome again on Saturday, going for 28 points and 12 boards as Kansas knocked off Villanova in Phog Allen Fieldhouse. The only reason that I don’t have Lawson ranked higher than this is that he might not actually be the best player on his own team this season; Lagerald Vick, when he’s not benched or suspended, has been a monster.

9. NICKEIL ALEXANDER-WALKER, Virginia Tech

Alexander-Walker was the best player on the floor for the the Hokies as they smoked Washington in Atlantic City on Saturday. He finished with 24 points and three assists, a return to dominance in the first game Virginia Tech has played against a relevant opponent in nearly three weeks.

10. CHARLES MATTHEWS, Michigan

This is the first appearance for Matthews — for any Michigan player — in the top ten of these rankings. I’m torn on who from that team should be considered their all-american candidate. I’ve discussed this before, but the way that this Michigan team is built does not lend itself to having a player in that mix. Zavier Simpson is their leader, but that doesn’t really show up in the box score. Ignas Brazdeikis is the team’s leading scorer, but this is a team that wins with defense. Jon Teske is the most-improved player on the roster. Jordan Poole is in that conversation as well.

But for my money, Matthews — who is an alpha defensively, plays a leadership role himself and is the team’s second-leading scorer — is the guy that should get the nod.

IN THE MIX: Jordan Caroline (Nevada), Luguentz Dort (Arizona State) Carsen Edwards (Purdue), Ja Morant (Murray State), Shamorie Ponds (St. John’s), Lagerald Vick (Kansas)

Trent Forrest helps No. 11 Florida State beat SE Missouri 85-68

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TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Trent Forrest scored a career high 23 points and freshman Devin Vassell added 16 points as No. 11 Florida State overcame a sluggish first half and beat Southeast Missouri 85-68 on Monday night.

Forrest shot 8 for 12 from the floor, and had a team-high eight rebounds and four assists to help the Seminoles (9-1) win their fourth straight.

Florida State secured its 30th straight non-conference home win. Nebraska is the last non-conference team to defeat the Seminoles, 70-65 on Dec. 1, 2014.

Ledarrius Brewer scored 16 points and Skyler Hogan added 14 points for Southeast Missouri (5-7).

Christ Koumadje added seven rebounds as Florida State outrebounded the undersized Redhawks 46-28.

Southeast Missouri led 47-42 with 14:46 to go but Florida State went on a 12-0 run to take control for good.

The Seminoles shot 50 percent (31 for 62). They were just 1 for 12 on 3-pointers in the first half before finishing 6 for 24.

Florida State senior forward Phil Cofer played for the first time this season after missing nine games due to a preseason foot injury. Cofer didn’t have a point or rebound in five minutes.

BIG PICTURE

Southeast Missouri: The Redhawks had Florida State on the ropes as Brewer scored 10 points in the first half. They ran out of gas in the second half and couldn’t match up with the Seminoles’ height or athleticism.

Florida State: The Seminoles were playing for the first time in eight days and were able to withstand the scrappy Redhawks.

UP NEXT

Southeast Missouri will host Abilene Christian on Friday.

Florida State hosts North Florida on Wednesday.

Sharp-shooting Vanderbilt beats No. 18 Arizona State 81-65

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Saben Lee scored 14 points to lead five players in double figures and sharp-shooting Vanderbilt beat No. 18 Arizona State 81-65 on Monday night.

Vanderbilt snapped an eight-game skid against ranked opponents that dated to an overtime win over Florida in the 2017 Southeastern Conference Tournament. The Commodores (7-2) also beat Arizona State for the first time in five tries on the Sun Devils’ first visit to Memorial Gym.

The Commodores had a big night from beyond the arc, hitting 6 of 12 from deep in the first half and 12 of 28 for the game.

Aaron Nesmith added 13 points off the bench for Vanderbilt. Yanni Wetzell had 12, and Matt Ryan and Joe Toye had 11 each.

Arizona State, which moved up two spots in the AP Top 25 earlier Monday, has lost two of three.

Rob Edwards led Arizona State with 14 points. Luguentz Dort came in as the fourth-highest freshman scorer in the nation averaging 20.9 points, but he had just 10 points. Zylan Cheatham had 14 rebounds.

This was the first game after the Commodores’ 12-day break for finals and is the second part of a home-and-home deal with Arizona State. The Sun Devils won 76-64 in Tempe last season.

Arizona State opened by scoring the first nine points as Vanderbilt missed its first six shots. After that, the Commodores finished the first half outscoring the Sun Devils 34-19, including an 18-3 run over the final 6:49.

Vanderbilt pushed that to 37-28 when Ryan hit a 3 to open the second half. Dort scored five straight points to pull Arizona State within 37-34, but that was as close as the Sun Devils got until Edwards and Kimani Lawrence hit back-to-back 3s with 3:53 left to pull within 62-59.

Simisola Shittu answered with a layup, and Toye knocked down a 3 as Vanderbilt pushed the lead back to double digits.

BIG PICTURE

Arizona State: The Sun Devils finish 2-1 in nonconference play against the SEC. They beat Mississippi State in November in Las Vegas and edged Georgia last weekend before coming to Nashville. … The Sun Devils came in ninth nationally with a rebound margin of 11.6, yet they outrebounded Vandy only 42-39.

Vanderbilt: The Commodores are part of a rare trio with UNLV and Princeton as the only programs to make a 3-pointer in every game since the 3-point line debuted for the 1986-87 season. After Vanderbilt missed its first seven shots, Nesmith hit a 3 to make it 1,040 straight games with a 3-pointer.

UP NEXT

Arizona State: Hosts top-ranked Kansas on Saturday.

Vanderbilt: Visits Kansas State on Saturday.

Notre Dame’s Rex Pflueger lost for season with ACL tear

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Notre Dame senior Rex Pflueger is done for the year.

The 6-foot-6 wing suffered a torn ACL on Saturday in the Fighting Irish’s win against Purdue and will miss the rest of the season, he announced Monday.

“I am saddened to find out that I did in fact tear my ACL in our last game against Purdue,” Pflueger wrote on social media. “This is just one of life’s crazy tests that I have prepared myself for with the loving help of my family and friends. I will continue to cheer and push my Notre Dame family to  not only compete but to dominate for the rest of the season.

“We have an incredible group of players who will pick up right where we left off last game.”

Pflueger has started every game for the 7-3 Irish. He was averaging 8.1 points, 4.7 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.7 steals per game while shooting 39 percent from the field and 38.9 percent from 3-point range.

“I’m extremely disappointed that he won’t be able to continue this season,” Notre Dame coach Mike Brey said in a statement. “He has been an unbelievable winner and leader for us. He has continually helped me endorse our culture he at Notre DAme.

“I look forward to him continuing to lead and giving me great feedback the rest of the season.”

Notre Dame, which previously lost Robby Carmody for the season with a torn labrum, will have some time to acclimate to a post-Pflueger reality as the Irish will face Binghamton, Jacksonville and Coppin State before beginning ACC play Jan. 1 at Virginia Tech.

Given the injury happened in the first half of the season and Pflueger has played in just 10 games, he could potentially be a medical redshirt candidate should he choose to pursue a fifth season of eligibility.