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Former UCLA guard Billy Knight was facing child molestation charges before suicide

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Former UCLA guard Billy Knight, who took his own life earlier this week, was arrested in June for sexually abusing a nine-year old girl, according to court documents that were obtained by The Mercury News.

The alleged assaults occurred in April of 2017 and Knight was reportedly arrested in Arizona in June. He was being charged with two counts of sexual conduct with a minor, two counts of sexual abuse, and two counts of molestation of a child.

Knight posted a video to YouTube prior to his death saying that he had lived a life of “sin”.

Ohio State grabs five-star 2019 point guard D.J. Carton

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Ohio State landed one of the biggest commitments so far this summer on Saturday as five-star Class of 2019 point guard D.J. Carton pledged to the Buckeyes.

The 5-foot-11 Carton burst onto the national recruiting scene this spring as he went from a relative unknown into a five-star prospect. Although Carton doesn’t play on a major shoe-company circuit he impressed national scouts and college coaches with his play during the April live evaluation period with Quad Cities Elite — the same program that produced quality college players like Wisconsin’s Ethan Happ and Montana State’s Tyler Hall.

An explosive athlete who can play above the rim, Carton showed a high amount of upside during the USA Basketball U18 tryouts in June as he competed against many of the top players in his class.

Ohio State is landing a key piece at an opportune time as they now have a lead guard of the future to help build around. Carton is only the third five-star prospect to commit from the Class of 2019 so far, as he’s the No. 17 overall prospect in the Rivals national rankings. Carton joins in-state four-star wing Alonzo Gaffney in the Buckeyes’ 2019 recruiting class as Ohio State has the makings of a potential top 10 recruiting class.

With where Ohio State was last summer, with head coach Chris Holtmann taking the job in June and the roster lacking scholarship players, the Buckeyes have had a monster turnaround in the last 14 months. Ohio State now, once again, looks like a scary team when it comes to recruiting as they should be a major factor for some elite prospects.

Alabama lands four-star wing Juwan Gary

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Alabama added a quality wing to its Class of 2019 recruiting haul on Friday as four-star Juwan Gary pledged to the Crimson Tide.

The 6-foot-5, 200-pound Gary has been a known national prospect since his freshman season as the South Carolina native is an athletic two-way wing who thrives in the open court. Although Gary still needs to polish up his jumper, he has the potential to be an impact player in the SEC, especially if Alabama gets him going in transition.

Gary joins four-star forward Diante Smith in the Crimson Tide recruiting class in 2019 as now head coach Avery Johnson and his staff can focus more of their efforts on adding to a potentially strong class. Pulling Gary out of South Carolina — especially in light of recent NCAA tournament success from in-state programs like South Carolina and Clemson — is an impressive recruiting win for Alabama.

Jalek Felton signs pro contract in Europe

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Jalek Felton’s college basketball career is over.

The former North Carolina point guard has signed a pro contract with Olimpija Lubiana, a club team in Slovenia, they announced.

“I’m happy to join a club like Petrol Olimpija,” Felton said in a statement. “This is a club with a rich tradition, where many NBA players have begun their careers. For me, this is a big step. I know that this will be a great challenge for me and I am ready to go there and work. My agent told me that Olimpija will play in various competitions and that makes me all the more pleased. Playing in such competitions with Olympia in Europe will prepare me for playing in the NBA. The city looks nice and I heard that basketball there is a religion, so this will be an interesting experience.”

Felton, the nephew of former UNC guard Ray Felton, was a five-star prospect that played in 22 games as a freshman with the Tar Heels. But he was suspended from the program in January and, in March, withdrew from school.

He averaged just 2.9 points in his one season in Chapel Hill.

Creighton lands local 2019 commit

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Omaha isn’t exactly thought of as a high school basketball hot bed, but Creighton has had success mining its hometown for talent in recent years, most notably in recent NBA draft picks Justin Patton and Khyri Thomas.

The Bluejays went back to the well Thursday by securing the commitment of Shereef Mitchell, a 6-foot guard from local Burke High School, he announced via social media.

“Being a kid from Omaha you dream of playing for Creighton and in front of the hotown fans,” Mitchell wrote. “That is something I want to do  and I don’t want to turn that opportunity down.

“I can’t wait to play in front of my family, friends and the best fans in the world!”

Burke was offered by Greg McDermott’s staff just earlier this week, adding to a list of offers that included Bradley, Loyola Chicago and South Dakota State.

Burke recently graduated from his Omaha high school, but will reclassify to 2019 after spending a season with Sunrise Christian in Wichita, Kan.

“I really feel like I will be a way better player than what I am right now after my year at Sunrise,” Mitchell told the Omaha World-Herald. “I think I could have a shot at being an impact player right away and possibly starting after a year there.”

Burke averaged 24.6 points and 3.8 assists per game as a high school senior, earning state player of the year honors in the process. He’s hoping to extend the line of Omaha products to thrive at Creighton.

“I’m a kid from Omaha, and getting an offer from Creighton is something kids dream of and it would be hard for me to pass up,” Mitchell told the World-Herald. “Seeing players like Khyri Thomas and Justin Patton, two kids from (Omaha public schools) that are in the NBA, it gives you hope that you can do the same thing.”

College basketball coaches universally oppose own proposal to change July recruiting

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NORTH AUGUSTA, S.C. — Over the years, Peach Jam — the finals of Nike’s EYBL summer circuit — has grown into being the preeminent event during July’s Live Period.

Played in the newly-renovated Riverview Park Activities Center, Peach Jam features six courts that are packed to the gills, with college coaches on one side of the floor, fans overflowing the bleachers on the other and a track circling the building overhead that can get four- or five-deep with people if the matchup is right.

It is without question the best and most intense basketball you’ll see in July, not only because of who is watching and what scholarships are going to get earned, but because of the honor that comes with winning a Peach Jam title.

But it’s also because of situations like this: James Wiseman, the No. 1 player in the Class of 2019, has long been considered a Kentucky-lean. But he’s also currently living in Memphis, having played his junior season at East High School for Penny Hardaway. He’s at Peach Jam playing for the Bluff City Legends, a team that, up until March, when Penny was hired by Memphis, was named Team Penny.

In Wiseman’s first game on Wednesday night, when he was facing off with the No. 2 player in the class, Vernon Carey, we had this scene courtside:

That’s Penny, the current Memphis head coach, and his assistants, Mike Miller and Tony Madlock, sitting next to John Calipari, the former Memphis head coach, and his entire staff, all of them there recruiting a kid that lives in Memphis and might end up being the No. 1 pick in the 2020 NBA Draft after he decides whether he will play his college ball for the Tigers or the Wildcats.

And this year’s Peach Jam may be the last time we see that.

As I reported last month, the NABC is proposing rule changes to the Condoleeza Rice-led Commission on College Basketball that will change the way that summer recruiting works. Instead of three five-day periods where coaches are allowed to be on the road, scouting and evaluating players at grassroots events around the country, the NABC is proposing a series of regional camps that thousands of players nominated by Division I coaches will attend, with the best of the best then attending a national camp. It would be run by USA Basketball, feature coaches from the G League, Division II and Division III and even NBA players leading drills and coaching teams, and — most importantly — be the only place in July where coaches are allowed to attend.

The goal?

To rid youth basketball of the stranglehold that summer coaches have on the recruitment of players around the country.

And quite frankly, it is a terrible idea, one that is a reactionary PR move being made to convince the public, people that don’t know what the hell they’re talking about, that the NCAA is trying to change after the FBI’s investigation into corruption in college basketball.

I spent 36 minutes explaining why on Tuesday’s podcast, so I’m not going to go into the specifics again. If that’s what you’re looking for, listen below.

What I will say here is this: I am currently at Peach Jam. I have spent the last 24 hours talking with coaches from all levels of the sport about these impending changes, and I cannot find a single one that thinks these changes are a good idea.

Not a single one.

The most positive response I have heard: “I guess we’ll make it work whatever the rules are.” That was from a coach that has been in the Final Four recently.

One coach told me that this is the kind of rule that will get changed in three years when people realize how stupid it is. Back in 2003, the NCAA passed a rule that eliminated the April live period, and by 2011, the coaches had successfully argued their way back into being at “non-scholastic events” in the spring. They wanted to be at the events, because it didn’t take long for them to realize that banning themselves from the biggest events did not actually kill off those events.

Just like this rule is not going to kill off shoe company-sponsored events like the EYBL or the random, assorted AAU tournaments that pop up all over the country every July.

The coaches just won’t be in the gym.

It’s not going to stop the games from being played, it just means they’ll be paying to watch a choppy live-stream of the games that keeps getting pixelated instead of paying for a packet to sit on chairs that are too close together and bleachers that couldn’t be more uncomfortable.

And the irony of it all is that this is self-inflicted.

The NABC is the National Association of Basketball Coaches. The people proposing are the coaches themselves.

So this is my plea: One of those coaches that is for this change and that helped put this into motion needs to come out publicly and say so. We need an explanation as to why these changes are needed, and why they aren’t idiotic. Someone needs to own this.

Because as far as I can tell, no one actually in the gyms thinks this is going to help.