2017 NBA Draft Preview: Who are the sleepers that could go undrafted?

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Over the course of the last three weeks, we’ve been churning out NBA Draft Prospect Profiles of the best players in this loaded draft for the fellas at Pro Basketball Talk.

You can find them here:

You can also find the latest NBC Sports Mock Draft here.

RELATED: Lottery Busts | First Round Values | Draft Sleepers

Today, we’ll be going through some of the draft’s sleepers, players that will be picked in the second round or go undrafted that should be able to carve out an NBA career.

Cameron Oliver, Nevada: Who is the next Draymond Green?

That’s what every NBA team is looking for, right? He’s the glue that holds Golden State’s small-ball assault on the league together. A 6-foot-6 forward that is as versatile offensively as he is on the defensive end of the floor. A play maker that can hit threes. A switchable defender that can protect the rim. A junkyard dog that is as tough and competitive as anyone in professional sports.

Let’s get this out of the way: There isn’t another Draymond Green coming. The combination of skills, physical tools and mentality that he has is as unique and as special as those possessed by the likes of Kevin Durant, Steph Curry and Russell Westbrook.

But that won’t stop teams from trying to find a guy that can fit that mold, and there may not be a better fit this year than Cameron Oliver. His physical tools are elite — he’s 6-foot-8 with a 7-foot-1 wingspan, a 40″ vertical and a chiseled, 240-pound frame. He’s also one of those guys that can protect the rim on one end of the floor while spacing the court on the other end; he blocked 2.6 shots per game while shooting 38 percent from three on just under five threes per game. On paper, that’s great.

So why is he looking at potentially being a late-second round pick?

For starters, his motor is not all that great. He had a habit of coasting through games in the Mountain West, and the fact that he still managed to average 16 points and 8.7 boards should give you an idea of his talent. He’s also a guy with some question marks about his basketball IQ. People haven’t forgotten another Mountain West product — former No. 1 overall pick Anthony Bennett — that quickly.

The difference here is opportunity cost. There’s virtually no risk in snagging Oliver with a late-second round pick, and the upside is impressive.

Deonte Burton, Iowa State: Like Oliver, Burton is another multi-positional talent and freak athlete that has question marks about things that don’t involve basketball.

Let’s start with the good: Burton was, more or less, Iowa State’s Draymond Green. Playing on a team that barely had a big man to speak of, the 6-foot-5 Burton spent much of his senior season playing the five. He wasn’t bad, either, as he has a 7-foot wingspan at 6-foot-5, he’s a strong (albeit probably overweight) 265 pounds and he can protect the rim, blocking nearly two shots per 40 minutes. He runs hot and cold, but he’s a career 41 percent three-point shooter that put together some absolutely mesmerizing offensive performances this season.

There’s more: Burton was strong enough to hold his own against Caleb Swanigan in the post against Purdue in the NCAA tournament and is quick and athletic enough to switch out onto guards in pick-and-rolls … when he’s engaged. He’s a capable passer as well, and the fact that he’s left-handed certainly doesn’t hurt.

Now to the bad: Burton is not always engaged. His effort defensively and on the glass runs hot and cold, just like his jump shot. Remaining in shape has been a constant issue — he showed up to Portsmouth at 266 pounds! — and saying there are concerns about his unprofessional approach is probably the most diplomatic way to phrase it.

The issue isn’t Burton’s talent or his fit in the modern NBA. The issue is Burton himself. The potential is certainly there.

Deonte Burton (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)

Davon Reed, Miami: Reed is a 6-foot-6 wing with a 7-foot wingspan that shot nearly 40 percent from three as a senior — and 37 percent for his college career — while making the ACC all-defensive team. If that doesn’t scream 3-and-D potential, I don’t know what does. There is some concern about his ability to make contested jumpers and what he will be able to do off the dribble offensively — he has quick feet but he lacks explosiveness and burst — but his frame suggests he’ll be able to handle the physicality of the next level.

Sindarius Thornwell, South Carolina: Thornwell capped a terrific senior season with a sensational NCAA tournament run. There’s not doubting what he can be as a defender at the next level given his size (6-foot-5, 215 pounds), his length (6-foot-10 wingspan) and who he played for (Frank Martin). Thornwell also showed off the ability to make threes consistently as well as pass the ball. He’s similar to Villanova’s Josh Hart, and while he has a bit more promise as a defender he does not project as well offensively.

Frank Mason III, Kansas; Nigel Williams-Goss, Gonzaga; and Monte’ Morris, Iowa State: All three of these guys are cut from the same cloth: Smart, veteran and talented point guards that spent four years in college while putting together All-American seasons. Mason was the 2017 National Player of the Year. Williams-Goss was a First-Team All-American and led Gonzaga to the national title game. Morris spent three years in the conversation for All-American teams while posting inhuman assist-to-turnover ratios.

Like T.J. McConnell and Fred VanVleet before them, these three are good enough to carve out a role as a backup point guard on someone’s roster.

Frank Mason III vs. Monte Morris (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

Luke Kornet, Vanderbilt: Rim protection and floor-spacing. The most valuable combination of skills in the modern NBA. Luke Kornet shot 32.1 percent from three as a senior — that number was over 40 percent as a sophomore — and blocked 2.0 shots per game as a senior — a number that was down from 3.0 as a junior. That’s what will get NBA teams interested in him. The downside? He’s a slow-footed 7-footer that isn’t all that tough, that doesn’t rebound all that well and that is not all that explosive at the rim. There’s a reason he may go undrafted.

Jake Wiley, Eastern Washington: Wiley is an interesting prospect simply because his back story is so fascinating. He was a no-name recruit that played a year at Montana before quitting basketball, trying track and football, transferring to an NAIA program and, eventually, winding up dominating the Big Sky for Eastern Washington. He’s a physical specimen that blocks shots, rebounds, competes and can defend multiple positions, but he’s not a floor-spacer and is just 6-foot-7 and 215 pounds having never played above the mid-major level. Kenneth Faried made it work. Can Wiley do the same?

Rodney Pryor, Georgetown: Pryor is built in the mold of a 3-and-D wing. He’s 6-foot-5 with a 6-foot-11 wingspan and he shot 41.2 percent from three as a senior at Georgetown. He also turns 25 years old in October, meaning that he probably already is what he is going to be as a player. Is that good enough to play in the NBA? I have little doubt that Pryor will get a shot somewhere along the line to prove that it is.

V.J. Beachem, Notre Dame: Beachem is another guy whose NBA potential centers on his ability to be a 3-and-D role player. Standing 6-foot-8 with a 6-foot-11 wingspan and some hops in space, Beachem shot just under 40 percent from three during his Notre Dame career. That said, he’s not known as a great defender, he needs to add some strength to his 200 pound frame to handle the rigors of the NBA and a relatively disappointing senior season has soured some scouts on him. But the tools, they are there.

Michigan, Beilien ink five-year extension

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Michigan announced on Wednesday that head coach John Beilein has signed a five-year contract extension with the school that will keep him in Ann Arbor through the 2023 season, at least.

“I am grateful for the opportunity the University of Michigan has given to me over the past 11 years,” said Beilein. “Kathleen and I love Ann Arbor, our University, our fans and the state of Michigan. We will continue to work very hard in the future to have our basketball team reflect the greatness of this University. I thank Mark Schlissel and Warde Manuel for their faith and commitment to our coaching staff and basketball program. The future of men’s basketball is bright and I am excited to be a part of it.”

The deal that Beilein signed is a rollover deal, which means that the contract will renew every year. In other words, as long as Beilein and Michigan want the option picked up each April, he will have a five-year contract with Michigan regardless of how long he coaches at the school.

This is Beilein’s 12th year with the Wolverines. Last season, they won a program-record 33 games and reached the Final Four, losing in the national title game for the second time in six seasons.

He is already Michigan’s all-time leader in wins with 248, and, through 41 seasons as a college coach, has amassed a career record of 799-461. In 11 seasons in Ann Arbor, Michigan has made eight NCAA Tournament appearances with four Sweet 16s and three Elite Eights in addition to the two trips to the Final Four. He was named the he 2013 Big Ten Coach of the Year and has won two Big Ten regular-season titles as well as the last two Big Ten Tournament titles.

There was some speculation earlier this month that Beilein would be leaving Michigan after he had an interview with the Detroit Pistons, but he withdrew from that search after the news became public and it seemed likely that Dwayne Casey would be hired.

VIDEO: Former Michigan athletes Austin Hatch and Abby Cole tie the knot

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The life of former Michigan basketball player Austin Hatch has not been without its challenges, as during his pre-college years he survived two separate plane crashes that took the lives of his parents, a stepmother and two siblings.

Hatch’s scholarship offer to Michigan was honored by head coach John Beilein despite the impact that the crashes had on Hatch physically, and Hatch would go on to earn his degree and land a job at the corporate office for Domino’s. This past spring, Hatch was honored during the team’s Senior Day festivities.

By that point Hatch was already engaged to Abby Cole, who played volleyball at Michigan from 2013 to 2016. And over the weekend, the two tied the knot in what was a highly emotional day for all involved. Below is a video of their wedding day, which was chronicled by Derek Postma.

Congratulations and best wishes to Abby and Austin on their marriage.

Arizona lands Cornell forward Stone Gettings for 2019-20 season

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Arizona landed its first addition for the 2019-20 season on Monday, as an Ivy League power forward revealed his intention to join Sean Miller’s program as a graduate student.

6-foot-9 forward Stone Gettings, who averaged 16.7 points, 6.6 rebounds and 2.9 assists per game at Cornell last season, picked Arizona over Stanford and Vanderbilt according to Evan Daniels of 247Sports.com. A second team All-Ivy selection, Gettings is on course to graduate from Cornell in December. Instead of using his final season of eligibility at Cornell, Gettings will sit out this season before playing at Arizona.

Gettings does have a connection to the Arizona program, as one of his high school teammates was former point guard Parker Jackson-Cartwright. The addition of Gettings will give Arizona a front court player who can score around the basket and from the perimeter, as he shot nearly 37 percent from beyond the arc last season.

Gettings isn’t the first Ivy League player to make his decision regarding a new school well in advance of his being able to move as a grad transfer, as former Yale point guard Makai Mason took a similar approach. Mason, who missed the entire 2016-17 season with a torn ACL, announced prior to last season that he be joining the Baylor program as a grad transfer for the 2018-19 campaign.

Not counting Gettings, Arizona has four scholarship front court players on its current roster who will have eligibility remaining in 2019-20, in current junior Chase Jeter, sophomores Emmanuel Akot and Ira Lee and freshman Omar Thielemans.

Bill Self: Silvio De Sousa’s eligibility not in jeopardy ‘at this stage’

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One of the biggest question marks heading into the 2018-19 season for the Kansas Jayhawks is the eligibility status of Silvio De Sousa.

If you’ve forgotten, a player that is believed to be De Sousa was referenced in a second round of indictments handed by the FBI. In those documents, De Sousa’s guardian is alleged to have asked an Adidas rep for at least $20,000 to repay a rival apparel company for a payment that was made to secure De Sousa’s commitment to another school. Prior to a surprise commitment to Kansas, De Sousa was long considered a Maryland lean. His AAU program and high school team were both sponsored by Under Armour, whose flagship program is Maryland.

According to Kansas head coach Bill Self, at this point De Sousa is still eligible.

“Nobody at this stage has given us any information that he could be in jeopardy at this stage,” Self said.

This is not surprising.

The way that I would expect this to play out is similar to the way it played out for players that were referenced in the indictments that came down last fall. Kansas is going to string this thing along until we get to a point in time close to the start of the season, when they will announce that De Sousa is being held out of competition. It is better for Kansas to bite the bullet and play without De Sousa than it would be for them to risk knowingly suiting up a player that can be retroactively ruled ineligible.

That sucks for De Sousa.

The good news for Kansas, however, is that Udoka Azubuike is back, as is Mitch Lightfoot, while both Dedric and K.J. Lawson will be eligible as they add freshman David McCormack. There is more than enough frontcourt depth to withstand the loss of De Sousa.

VIDEO: The #ShiggyChallenge has reached college hoops with Loyola’s coach showing his skills

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New Loyola-Maryland head coach Tavaras Hardy became the first college basketball head coach to get in on the Shiggy Challenge, as he posted this video to twitter on Tuesday morning:

What is the #ShiggyChallenge?

It’s the latest viral dance, which started just two weeks ago when an online personality named Shiggy posted himself dancing to Drake’s “In My Feelings” on Instagram:

#Mood : KEKE Do You Love Me ? 😂😂😂 @champagnepapi #DoTheShiggy #InMyFeelings

A post shared by Shoker🃏 (@theshiggyshow) on

From there, it took off, with everyone from Odell Beckham Jr. to James Harden trying to prove themselves capable of taking down the #ShiggyChallenge.

And now Tavaras Hardy is doing it.

The end.