Late Night Snacks: No. 3 Gonzaga hangs on despite poor foul shooting

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GAME OF THE NIGHT: No. 3 Gonzaga 78, Pepperdine 76

On occasion favored teams have to find a way to win with an area of strength suddenly turning into a major weakness. That was the case for the Bulldogs in Malibu, as they hung on for the two-point win despite shooting an incredible 11-for-29 from the foul line. Gonzaga entered the game making 73.2% of their attempts from the charity stripe. Kyle Wiltjer led the winners with 24 points (19 in the second half), eight rebounds and four assists, and Damontas Sabonis added 18 and 12 off the bench. For Pepperdine Jett Raines was outstanding, scoring a career-high 22 points on 10-for-14 shooting from the field (and six rebounds), and Stacy Davis added 21 and seven boards. Gonzaga’s now 6-0 in the WCC, tied for first with a Saint Mary’s team they face in Spokane next Thursday.

IMPORTANT OUTCOMES 

1. No. 7 Wisconsin 70, Nebraska 55

The Badgers played their first full game without starting point guard Traevon Jackson, and they performed well against the Huskers in Madison. Frank Kaminsky, who missed Sunday’s loss at Rutgers due to a concussion, led five Badgers in double figures with 22 points. And guard Bronson Koenig, who moved into Jackson’s spot in the starting lineup, accounted for 11 points and four rebounds. Terran Petteway scored a game-high 27 for Nebraska, but no other player scored more than eight with Shavon Shields (eight) and Walter Pitchford (seven) combining to score just 15 points.

2. No. 10 Arizona 68, Colorado 54

Sean Miller’s Wildcats took care of an undermanned Colorado squad, and their work on the offensive glass was one reason why. With Josh Scott and Xavier Johnson both out, the Buffaloes were unable to keep Arizona from grabbing 13 offensive rebounds (resulting in 17 second-chance points) and scoring 30 points in the paint (plus-16 advantage for Arizona in this statistical category). Stanley Johnson led the way for the Wildcats with 22 points and eight rebounds, while Askia Booker scored a career-high 30 and was Colorado’s lone double-figure scorer.

3. No. 8 Utah 76, Arizona State 59

Shortly after the Wildcats took care of Colorado, the eighth-ranked Utes finished off a win at Arizona State, moving to 4-0 in Pac-12 play. Delon Wright finished with 21 points and six assists, with Jordan Loveridge (14 points) and Brandon Taylor (13) also scoring in double figures. Utah limited Arizona State to 39.3% shooting from the field, and other than Gerry Blakes (ten points) no Sun Devil managed to score in double figures. Next up for Utah: No. 10 Arizona, Saturday night in Tucson.

4. George Washington 73, Richmond 70 (2OT)

This one nearly ended in the first overtime, with a foul being called on the Colonials with the score tied at 58 apiece. However it was ruled that the foul occurred after time had expired, meaning that another five minutes needed to be played. Mike Lonergan’s Colonials found a way to pick up the win, with Kevin Larsen rebounding from a scoreless performance in a loss at La Salle to the tune of 22 points and 11 rebounds. Kendall Anthony led the Spiders with 20 points but he needed 19 field goal attempts (making six) in doing so. George Washington is now 3-1 in the Atlantic 10, sitting one game behind Dayton and No. 17 VCU.

STARRED

1. Kyle Collinsworth (BYU)

Collinsworth posted his fourth triple-double of the season in the Cougars’ 93-80 win at Pacific, finishing with 17 points, 11 rebounds and 11 assists. Collinsworth joins Michael Anderson (Drexel, 1985-86), Brian Shaw (UCSB, 1987-88), Jason Kidd (California, 1993-94) and Stephane Lasme (2006-07 UMass) as players who have accomplished this particular feat in a single season.

2. Karam Mashour, Morehead State

22 points and 11 rebounds in the Eagles’ 91-63 win over SIU-Edwardsville.

3. Ashton Moore, The Citadel

Shot 10-for-17 from the field, scoring 29 points in the Bulldogs’ 69-66 home win over Wofford.

4. Josh Hawkinson, Washington State

Hawkinson is one of the most improved players in America, and he’s a big reason why the Cougars are now 3-1 in Pac-12 play after beating Oregon 108-99 in overtime. Hawkinson finished the game with 26 points, 13 rebounds and three assists.

STRUGGLED

1. Drexel

The Dragons shot 24 percent (12-for-50) in a 54-35 loss to James Madison.

2. Cincinnati

The Bearcats shot 39.1% from the field and finished with more turnovers (20) than made field goals (18) in a 63-50 loss at Memphis.

3. Gonzaga at the foul line

The Bulldogs won, beating Pepperdine 78-76, but they did so despite shooting a putrid 11-for-29 from the foul line.

NOTABLES

  • The Citadel handed Wofford its first SoCon loss Thursday night, beating the preseason favorites 69-66 with Ashton Moore scoring a game-high 29 points.
  • Florida moved to 3-0 in SEC play with a 75-55 win over Auburn, and the Gators have now won 24 consecutive SEC games.
  • T.J. Price scored 27 points and grabbed eight rebounds, and George Fant added a double-double (23 and ten), as Western Kentucky moved to 4-0 in Conference USA with an 88-85 overtime win at FAU.
  • Bryant is now 4-1 in the NEC after beating Wagner 81-73, with Dyami Starks leading four players in double figures with 26 points. Marcus Burton scored 31 for the Seahawks, but no other Wagner player scored more than ten (Romone Sanders).
  • Austin Nichols and Avery Woodson combined to score 31 points and Kedren Johnson gave Memphis some much-needed stability at the point in the Tigers’ 63-50 win over Cincinnati.
  • Of the seven players who scored in Murray State’s 92-77 win over Belmont six reached double figures, with guard Cameron Payne scoring a team-high 23 points. The Racers are now 4-0 in OVC play.
  • Louisiana Tech joined WKU at 4-0 in C-USA play with a 74-71 win over UAB, with Erik McCree scoring a game-high 26 points to pace the Bulldogs.
  • Khalil Felder scored 20 points as Oakland handed Green Bay its first Horizon League loss by the final score of 69-66.
  • UC Davis remains the lone undefeated team in Big West play, as they moved to 3-0 with a 74-61 win at UC Riverside. Corey Hawkins scored 26 for the Aggies.

Race and Sports in America: Steph Curry, Charles Barkley on impact of George Floyd’s death, Black Lives Matter

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Stephen Curry and Charles Barkley were among the athletes that say down and spoke with NBC about the intersection of sports and race in America.

The Black Lives Matter movement reached a crescendo in late May, when a police officer knelt on the neck of a Minneapolis man named George Floyd for eight minutes and 46 seconds, suffocating him while knowingly being recorded. The murder, which followed the deaths of Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbary, set off weeks of riots and has led to two months of protest across the country and around the world.

Race and Sports in America: Conversations is a one-hour show with two segments that debuts on NBCSN on Monday, July 13 at 8 pm ET.

It will be simulcast on Golf Channel, Olympic Channel, and the regional sports networks. Along with Curry and Barkley, Minnesota Vikings tight end Kyle Rudolph, San Diego Chargers coach Anthony Lynn, golfer Troy Mullins, tennis player James Blake, former Saint Louis Cardinals shortstop Ozzie Smith and former Pittsburgh Steeler Jerome Bettis participated in the discussions.

Below, you can find an excerpt of Barkley and Curry discussing the way they are treated by white America as famous, Black athletes.


DAMON HACK:  It’s interesting.  You guys have all played at the highest level.  You’ve had people that would cheer for you when you were in uniform.  But if you were walking down the street and not wearing your uniform and you had a hoodie on, they might look at you a little bit different.

How do you navigate that?

CHARLES BARKLEY:  The notion that rich and famous Black people are treated like regular Black people, that’s not right.  We get treated great.  But I always worry about how we treat poor Black people.

You know, there’s a great thing  and Spike Lee, who I really admire and respect  in that movie, “Do The Right Thing,” that’s a perfect illustration what Ozzie is talking about, what I’m talking about, when the guy says, you know, you hate Black people.  He says, yeah, I hate Black people.  He says, who is your favorite entertainer.  He says Michael Jackson.  He says, who is your favorite jock.  He says, Michael Jordan.  He’s says, they’re Black.  And he said, well, they’re not “Black.”

And that’s the disadvantage that us four we’re at a disadvantage because White people treat us great.  And, like I say, I’m not worried about how they treat us because it really comes down to economics, too, at some point, because rich Black people aren’t treated like poor Black people.  And that’s the thing we’ve got to really engage conversation.

How can we get more Black people and poor White people also, but they’re in the same boat, give them economic opportunity.  That’s what America’s really got to grapple with.

STEPH CURRY:  I think one thing you said, too, is the preconceived notions of how they view rich, successful Black people as anomalies and our intelligence and our well spokenness, that’s always the first thing you hear.  If somebody knows how to be articulate, if they know how to

ALL:  So well spoken.

STEPH CURRY:  Come into a room  that’s the subtle racism and prejudice that kind of starts to add on itself.  And if another White person hears that comment, they’re going to think the same thing.  And it’s not going to trickle down to anybody else, and be able to create opportunities for somebody else to get that in that room and prove their value, prove their worth.

It’s just shifting perspectives and, again, holding everybody accountable whether it’s a private conversation, whether it’s a tweet, whether it’s a video.  Whatever it is, to do the right thing, no pun intended, but to see everybody as equal and that’s all we’re asking for.

Kara Lawson hired as new Duke head coach

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Duke announced on Saturday that Kara Lawson, a former Tennessee guard and ESPN commentator, has been hired as the new head coach of the school’s women’s basketball team.

Lawson, 39, had been an assistant coach with the Boston Celtics before accepting the job at Duke, where she will be replacing Joanne McCallie. McCallie announced earlier this month that she would not be returning to the program.

Lawson is the first Black head coach in the program’s history, the second Black head coach hired by an ACC school this offseason and the third Black woman coaching an ACC women’s team. In total, there are five Black head coaches in the league on the women’s side.

Zion’s attorneys: Court filing claiming $400K payment contains fraudulent information

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Attorneys representing Zion Williamson in a lawsuit filed by former his marketing agent Gina Ford have claimed that the allegations set forth in her latest court filing are “fraudulent” and “a desperate and irresponsible attempt to smear Mr. Williamson.”

Ford claimed to have obtain “newly-discovered evidence” regarding her lawsuit against Zion, specifically that the player and his stepfather accepted $400,000 from a marketing agent named Slavko Duric in October of 2018. Zion signed a contract with Ford and her company, Prime Sports Marketing, on April 20, 2019, five days after he declared for the NBA draft. Less than two months later, he backed out of that deal to sign with CAA, the most powerful agency in the business that will also be representing his basketball interests. Ford is suing Williamson for breach of contract.

The outcome of the case hinges on a law in the state of North Carolina known as UAAA — the Uniform Athlete Agent Act — that requires a contract to make it clear to a student-athlete that by signing with an agent, they forfeit their remaining eligibility. This marketing contract did not have that language in it, and Williamson’s lawyers are arguing that this made the contract itself invalid. Ford’s attorneys, on the other hand, are attempting to prove that Zion was actually ineligible at the time, meaning that he was not protected by UAAA, and this evidence is their latest attempt to do it.

Except, according to the attorneys representing Zion Williamson’s family, all of the evidence in the latest filing in this lawsuit is fake.

Included in the exhibits attached to the motion filed by Ford’s lawyers is a statement from a man named Donald Kreiss, who claims that he invested in a company owned by Duric called Maximum Management Group. MMG purportedly had an exclusive marketing agreement with Williamson, the proof being an agreement that was allegedly signed by Williamson, a letter of declaration to repay the $400,000 that was paid in 2018 and a copy of Zion’s driver’s license.

“The alleged ‘agreements’ and driver’s license attached to these papers are fraudulent,” read a statement from Jeffery Klein, Zion’s attorney and obtained by Daniel Wallach of The Athletic. “Neither Mr. Williamson nor his family know these individuals nor had any dealing with them. We had previously alerted Ms. Ford’s lawyers to both this fact and that we had previously reported the documents to law enforcement as forgeries, but they chose to go ahead with another frivolous filing anyway.”

Here is a photo, courtesy of Wallach’s twitter feed, of Zion’s license.

Via @WALLACHLegal

Speaking as someone that bartended on a college campus for a decade, I would not accept this ID. The ‘E’ at the end of LICENSE is not in bold. The last three digits of his zip code are a different font than the first two. There is no shadow behind his ears in the picture, which is the first thing I was taught to look for on an ID I thought was fake. Most conspicuous? His weight is listed as a height and his height is listed as a weight.

Furthermore, Zion’s attorneys claim that Duric is the same man that tried to run a similar scam on Luka Doncic.

“A simple Google search reveals that Slavko Duric, whose ostensible sports marketing entity has no online presence, purportedly attempted to defraud Luka Doncic … using a scheme in which he forged Doncic’s and his mother’s signatures on a contract,” read a letter, obtained by Wallach. that Williamson’s attorney sent to Ford’s attorney before the motion was filed.

The intrigue into Zion Williamson’s lawsuit is about smearing Duke basketball’s image

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This column was originally published on May 11th of 2020.

The public intrigue into Zion Williamson’s current lawsuit and legal battle has nothing to do with Zion Williamson himself and everything to do with smearing the glossy veneer of the Duke basketball program.

That’s the truth.

The numbers involved in this litigation — reportedly up to $200 million is at stake — will certainly raise some eyebrows, but contract disputes are rarely interesting for anyone that isn’t in law school. That’s what this is. Zion signed a contract with Gina Ford and Prime Sports Marketing on April 20, 2019, five days after he declared for the NBA draft. Less than two months later, he backed out of that deal to sign with CAA, the most powerful agency in the business that will also be representing his basketball interests. Ford is suing Williamson for breach of contract.

The outcome of this civil case is going to hinge on a law in the state of North Carolina known as UAAA — the Uniform Athlete Agent Act — that requires a contract to make it clear to a student-athlete that by signing with an agent, they forfeit their remaining eligibility. This marketing contract did not have that language in it, and Williamson’s lawyers will argue that this made the contract itself invalid.

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(And no, I don’t, for a second, think that Zion was ever returning to Duke. Neither does Ford, or anyone with any common sense. It’s why I wrote this “column” last May, when the rumors of Zion returning to school started rolling through the basketball world. That said, if I was a cynic, I would take a close look at that timeline. Rumors of Zion returning to school just happened to start circulating right around the time that he was trying to find a way out of a marketing contract to sign with a bigger agency? Hmm. Interesting. But I’m not a cynic, so I certainly won’t suggest that it was nothing other than a well-orchestrated PR ploy knowing that this would inevitably end up in the court system one day. Wouldn’t dream of insinuating anything like it.)

Which brings us to Mother’s Day.

That’s when Daniel Wallach of The Athletic first published snippets of the latest Zion Williamson lawsuit that was filed by Ford and her attorneys. Among them were requests for admission that Zion and his family received all kinds of money, benefits and gifts to play at Duke and to induce him to wear Nike and Adidas at different points during his high school career. The legal ploy is simple, really: If Zion or his parents are forced, under oath, to admit that they accepted illegal benefits at any point during his recruitment or while on the roster at Duke, it would mean that he was retroactively ineligible. If he was actually ineligible during his one season in Durham, then the UAAA wouldn’t be relevant. The contract, which, according to Ford’s lawsuit, could only be terminated with cause, would stand and Zion would be on the hook for a lot of money.

At this point, it does not appear that there is much evidence proving that Zion accepted illegal benefits. When asked by Dana O’Neil of The Athletic if they have any proof of wrongdoing, Ford’s attorney said, “We have ideas, opinions and some leads of our own. We are looking for information to support our case. This is what we want to know.” Requests for admission are, essentially, fact-finding missions during discovery in civil cases. Put another way, at this point, these requests are nothing more than proof that Ford’s lawyers have heard the same rumors and read the same court docs that people in basketball circles and on college basketball message boards have.

But no one actually cares about the legalese here, because if they did, they’d realize that Zion is under no obligation to answer, and even if he is somehow forced to, nothing will come of this for a long, long time.

The people that care this case care about catching Coach K in a lie. They care about proving that the holier-than-thou way that Duke carries itself is fraudulent. They care about finding a way to get something — anything — to stick to the program that recruits better than anyone else in an era where recruiting is the Wild, Wild West.

Do you remember when Lance Thomas dropped $30,000 in cash as a down payment for $67,800 in jewelry a year before Thomas and Duke won the 2010 national title? Nothing came of it. Remember when Corey Maggette admitted to receiving payments from Myron Piggie before becoming a member of the team that made it to the 1999 national title game? Nothing came of that, either. Nothing happened when Wendell Carter’s name popped up on expense reports submitted by Christian Dawkins. Nothing happened when Michael Avenatti alleged that Nike paid Marvin Bagley’s family.

All told, there are 13 high-major programs that are dealing with the fallout from the FBI’s investigation into college basketball: Alabama, Arizona, Auburn, Creighton, Kansas, Louisville, LSU, Memphis, N.C. State, Oklahoma State, South Carolina, TCU and USC.

Duke, despite a cloud of smoke surrounding Zion that would make Seth Rogen envious, has been hit with … nada.

The public is looking for their pound of flesh, and nothing would satiate that bloodlust quite like an admission from Zion Williamson in this lawsuit that he was paid to go to Duke.

Ivy League calls off fall sports due to outbreak

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The Ivy League on Wednesday became the first Division I conference to say it will not play sports this fall because of the coronavirus pandemic, a person with knowledge of the decision told The Associated Press. The league left open the possibility of moving some seasons to the spring if the outbreak is better controlled by then.

The decision was described to the AP by a person speaking on the condition of anonymity in advance of the official announcement.

Although the coalition of eight academically elite schools does not grant athletic scholarships or compete for an NCAA football championship, the move could have ripple effects throughout the big business of college sports. Football players in the Power Five conferences have already begun workouts for a season that starts on Aug. 29, even as their schools weigh whether to open their campuses to students or continue classes remotely.

The Ivy decision affects not just football but everything before Jan. 1, including soccer, field hockey, volleyball and cross country, as well as the nonconference portion of the basketball season.

Power Five conferences told The Associated Press on Wednesday that they were still considering their options. But it was the Ivy League’s March 10 decision to scuttle its postseason basketball tournament that preceded a cascade of cancellations that eventually enveloped all major college and professional sports.

“What’s happening in other conferences is clearly a reflection of what’s happening nationally and any decisions are made within that context,” said Dr. Chris Kratochvil, the chair of the Big Ten’s infectious disease task force, adding that there is no “hard deadline” for a decision.

“Clearly, regardless of what happens in the fall, sports are coming back eventually,” he said. “So we want to make sure that whenever that time (is) right to return to competition, that we have the infrastructure and the recommendations in place to be able to do so safely for the student-athletes, staff, coaches, fans, students.”

Ivy League schools are spread across seven Northeastern states that, as of mid-July, have seen some success at controlling the COVID-19 outbreak. But most of those states still ban large gatherings; under the Massachusetts reopening plan, Harvard would not be allowed to have fans in the stands until a vaccine is developed.

Harvard has already announced that all classes for both semesters will be held virtually; dorms will be open only to freshmen and seniors. Yale said it would limit its dorms to 60% capacity and said most classes would be conducted remotely. Princeton will also do most of its teaching online, with dorms at half capacity.