The travel isn’t the only stressful part of the recruiting process for elite high schoolers

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — There has been plenty of discussion this July about just how exhausting the three week live recruiting period can be for players and the coaches, when they are either playing or evaluating at events across the country for 15 days in a 19-day span.

The things players will do to earn a scholarship, and the things that a coach will do to try to advance his career.

That’s not the only part of the process that is exhausting for these players, however, particularly the country’s biggest names. The sheer volume of games and the fact that they are so spread out — not only across the country, but in one city; more than 50 courts were used during the final live period weekend in Las Vegas alone, while the second weekend featured major events in Washington, D.C., Milwaukee and Los Angeles — means that many media members and coaches will only have one or two chances to see your team play. First impressions mean a lot, and if you don’t perform well, they may not be back.

“You don’t ever want to disappoint,” said Allonzo Trier, a top 30 recruit in the Class of 2015. “To be advertised to be this good, that means that every single game you play, there’s someone that hasn’t seen you play. If you don’t live up to it, then there’s a guy that’s seen you play on your bad day. He doesn’t think you’re that good.”

That’s a lot of pressure to heap on a teenager playing his third game of the day in an event a couple of time zones away from his home. It will help with evaluating to a point, as the cream generally rises to the top in a stressful situation, but since the majority of the nation’s best players are already known by the summer before their senior year, it can be difficult for a borderline Division I prospect to try and earn himself a free education.

“I wouldn’t say it’s overwhelming, I would say I’m grateful,” Abdul Malik-Abu, a top 50 prospect in the Class of 2014, said. “Some kids would wish to be in my position, with college coaches after them every day. I just take it in stride.”

Perhaps the most overwhelming part for these kids is the crush of attention after every game they play, particularly for those that are uncommitted. Coaches are texting them, reporters are in their face with microphones and their twitter mentions and blowing up while their only concerned about figuring out how to find a way to get something healthy to eat that won’t leave them too full to play again in a couple of hours.

“After every game, man, at least three times. I get interviewed a lot,” Rashad Vaughn, an uncommitted, top ten guard in the Class of 2014, said. “Sometimes it does [get overwhelming], but at the same time, this is what comes with it. You’ve got to live with it. You can’t hide from it, so you’ve got to embrace it.”

Vaughn said his phone buzzes at least seven times a day, every day, with calls or text message from coaches, and that doesn’t take into account the reporters that are reaching out to him.

That’s how it was for top 20 recruit JaQuan Lyle before he committed to Louisville. “Before it was really crazy, I got a lot of calls and texts every day, every week.” After every game he played, he would do at least four interviews, Lyle said, and that at least three times in every interview he would be asked about his school list and if he was committing. Part of the reason for that is that he’s an Indiana native that was being recruited by Louisville and Indiana — two places with rabid fan bases and massive media contingents — and Lyle certainly was welcoming of the attention. But as an example of what he was dealing with, the first time that Lyle spoke to the media at the the NBPA Top 100 Camp in Charlottesville, VA, he was swarmed by at least 10 reporters while three cameras zoomed in on him.

I witnessed it, because I was one of the reporters with a recorder in his face.

And it’s more media attention than I’ve seen given to some all-conference players and future lottery picks after a college game.

“It’s a big change,” Lyle said of the attention that he’s gotten since committing to Louisville this month. “Not that many reporters will interview you after the game. … Every once in a while I still here from a school, but I tell them I committed.”

James Blackmon, a top 40 recruit from Indiana, committed to the Hoosiers as a freshman in high school and has never waivered. He says that he still is interviewed after AAU games in July, but that it’s always the same Indiana reporters and it’s more laid back when he isn’t getting grilled about the status of his recruitment.

Blackmon said that he was never concerned about the attention, just preparing himself for the next level.

“Getting interviews because you’re not committed and stuff like that, it really wasn’t a big deal to me,” he said. “Just being more mature and seeing what I’m going to do at the next level. There’s guys that like that attention, and it’s probably why they wait it out. But I felt like that wasn’t a big deal. You can have it at the next level if you keep working at it.”

To a man, every prospect that I talked to said they looked forward to getting the recruiting process over with.

Lyle said committing took away a lot of the stress of July, and that he “you just get back to having fun” and playing basketball. Vaughn said “I can’t wait to commit”, although he emphasized he thought it was in his best interest to wait until the spring to make a decision. Malik-Abu said he is “looking forward to making my decision” and that when he does, it’s “going to be a relief.”

No one in the class has received more attention that the nation’s top point guard and the nation’s top big man — Tyus Jones and Jahlil Okafor — who have made it quite clear that they want to go to school together.

Jones hasn’t had an issue with coaches calling too much — he made it quite clear early on that he didn’t want his phone to be ringing off the hook, and the coaches still in the mix are the coaches that have respected that — but he said that he’s still ready to have the process overwith.

“It’s been such a long process, so much goes into it. Once I make a decision I’ll be happier.”

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Washington lands second 2019 verbal commitment

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With three of its four seniors heading into the 2018-19 season being perimeter players, Washington has some holes to address in its 2019 recruiting class. Thus far Mike Hopkins and his staff have done just that, with both of the program’s commits to date being perimeter players.

The second verbal commitment was received Tuesday afternoon, as three-star combo guard Marcus Tsohonis announced that he will be a Husky. Tsohonis, a Jefferson HS (Portland, Oregon) product who played his grassroots basketball for Seattle Rotary Elite on the Nike EYBL circuit, joins four-star wing RaeQuan Battle in Washington’s 2019 class to date.

The 6-foot-4 Tsohonis, who can play on or off the ball, held offers from multiple Pac-12 programs but ultimately made the decision to make the trek north from Portland to Seattle for his collegiate career. His verbal commitment comes on the heels of an official visit to Washington that was taken this past weekend.

As noted above Washington will loose some key contributors on the perimeter after the upcoming season, with David Crisp, Mathysse Thybulle and Dominic Green all entering their final season of eligibility (big man Noah Dickerson is also a senior). The additions of Tsohonis and Battle should help Washington when it comes to filling those holes and continuing to build upon the foundation laid during Hopkins’ first season at the helm.

Four-star guard becomes LSU’s first 2019 commit

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Expected to be a factor both within the SEC and nationally this season, these are good times for the LSU men’s basketball program. Head coach Will Wade and his staff received more good news Tuesday, as 6-foot-2 combo guard James Bishop (Baltimore, Maryland/Mount St. Joseph HS) announced that he will be a Tiger next season.

Bishop, considered to be one of the top scoring guards in the class, is LSU’s first 2019 verbal commitment. Bishop’s pledge comes just over a week after his official visit to LSU, and just days after a visit to St. John’s. LSU beat out St. John’s, NC State, Marquette and VCU in the race for the Baltimore product, and given the Tigers’ current roster this is an important commitment.

LSU’s 2018 recruiting class is considered to be one of the nation’s best, with point guard Javonte Smart being one of the five-star prospects in that quintet (forwards Naz Reid and Emmitt Williams being the others). Add in sophomore Tremont Waters, who’s coming off of an outstanding freshman season, and LSU could be in a position next summer where its top two lead guards are at the very least testing the NBA draft waters.

Landing Bishop gives LSU another talented option, and some cover should the program lose either Waters or Smart — or both — in 2019.

Calhoun officially named head coach at DIII St. Joseph

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WEST HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Jim Calhoun has officially been named the head coach at Division III University of Saint Joseph in Connecticut.

The Hall of Famer had already announced he would be taking the job and has been working for a year to establish a men’s basketball program at the small Catholic university, which was an all-women’s school until this school year.

Calhoun also has continued to serve in an advisory role at UConn, where he served as coach for 26 seasons and led the Huskies to three of their four national titles before retiring in 2012.

The 76-year-old will return to the sidelines with a career record of 873-380 when the Blue Jays open the season on Nov. 9 against William Paterson University.

That game will be played at Trinity College in Hartford, which has a gym that seats about 2,200 people, about 1,000 more than the gymnasium at Saint Joseph.

Oregon State announces addition of transfer Payton Dastrup

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Tuesday afternoon Oregon State announced that former BYU power forward Payton Dastrup has joined the program as a transfer. Dastrup, who averaged 3.3 points and 1.8 rebounds in just under eight minutes per game last season, has two seasons of eligibility remaining. Oregon State will file a waiver on his behalf in hopes that Dastrup will be granted immediate eligibility.

Should the waiver request be denied, Dastrup will not be eligible to play until the 2019-20 season. For Oregon State’s sake, even with Dastrup’s career numbers he would fill a need for a team that bid farewell to its best big man during the spring.

Drew Eubanks’ decision to turn pro left a noticeable hole in Oregon State’s interior rotation, with senior Gligorije Rakocevic and junior Ben Kone being the most experienced returnees. Those two combined to average 3.1 points and 3.5 rebounds per game in 2017-18, with Rakocevic averaging 10.6 minutes per game in 27 appearances off the bench.

In addition to those two the Beavers add three scholarship newcomers to the mix this season in junior college transfer Kylor Kelley and freshmen Warren Washington and Jack Wilson. Dastrup has the ability to step away from the basket, which would give Oregon State a little versatility in the interior to go along with a perimeter/wing rotation led by Tres Tinkle, Stephen Thompson Jr. and Ethan Thompson.

Oklahoma State lands third 2019 commitment

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Oklahoma State managed to add another verbal commitment in its 2019 class on Tuesday, as four-star combo guard Avery Anderson III announced via Twitter that he will play his college basketball for Mike Boynton. Anderson picked Oklahoma State over offers from Florida, LSU, TCU and Texas Tech.

Anderson is Oklahoma State’s third commitment in the class, as the Justin, Texas product joins twins Kalib and Keylan Boone. The Boone brothers made their pledge in mid-April, and all three took official visits to Stillwater this past weekend.

Anderson’s commitment is key for two reasons. First there’s the fact that he can be used at either guard spot, and that versatility will be valuable for Oklahoma State once he arrives on campus. Also, while Oklahoma State will be quite young in the front court this coming season that isn’t the case on the perimeter.

Of Oklahoma State’s current crop of guards/wings only two, freshman Isaac Likekele and redshirt sophomore Michael Weathers, are underclassmen. The Cowboys have just one senior in the group, Mike Cunningham, but getting a guard in the 2019 class was key for Boynton’s program.

At this point, all 13 of Oklahoma State’s scholarships for the 2019-20 season have been filled with Anderson’s commitment.