Is Syracuse thinking about ditching the Carrier Dome?

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The Carrier Dome is approaching its 33rd birthday as the home venue for Syracuse football, basketball and lacrosse games, and for the same reasons that folks around town have been speculating about how much longer Jim Boeheim will remain with the program, questions seem to be percolating about how much longer the Dome will remain.

The Orange are headed to the ACC next season, bringing on a brand new era in Cuse athletics. For the first time since Jimmy Carter was president, Syracuse will be a part of a league other than the Big East.

Is it time that the University upgrades to a newer, more up-to-date facility?

Arenas and practice gyms have become the arms race in college athletics. Is the marriage with the Carrier Dome pulling Syracuse down?

From Donna Ditota of the Syracuse Post-Standard:

Daryl Gross is busily hatching potential arena alternatives.

“I think Central New York deserves an unbelievable place,” said Gross, SU’s athletic director. “You’ve got all these great new stadiums in New York City and then you start coming upstate and the next biggest thing you run into is the Dome. And so there will be a day one day for folks up here to be able to enjoy and take advantage of those kinds of amenities. That’s part of our thinking. We always think that way. And I’m a big dreamer, anyway.”

That’s all well and good, but how much does the opinion of the most popular man in Upstate New York matter? Boeheim doesn’t want to see the Dome go:

Boeheim prefers to extend the shelf life of a stadium that has helped facilitate unprecedented growth for his program. He believes the Dome, with its quirky visuals, its capacity to accommodate vast basketball crowds and its strong Syracuse association, still serves the university’s athletic interests.

The Dome, Boeheim said, is one of a kind. And he said that distinction holds valuable appeal.

“You build a new basketball arena, then you’ve got a basketball arena, just like everybody else has,” Boeheim said. “We have a unique building. And it’s in good shape. I’m not sure there’s a reason. And if you build a place, where will it be?”

I actually agree with Boeheim here.

Syracuse is a weird fit in the ACC, as it’s usually blanketed by snow throughout the hoops season. Instead of pitching the opportunity to play for one of the Big East’s marquee programs and a chance to make a run at a Big East tournament title in Madison Square Garden, the Orange will be selling the chance to play in a conference with Duke, North Carolina and Louisville.

I’m not saying they won’t be successful. I’m saying it will be different, and there’s no guarantees that they are going to be able to consistently bring in the same kind of talent they currently land when Boeheim is gone.

But the one thing that the Orange will always be able to pitch, at least from a hoops perspective, is the chance to play in a building that routinely packs in 30,000 fans for home games.

There is no where else in the country that happens.

I understand the desire to have a shiny new facility to show off, but I think renovating the Dome would be a much, much better option than building a new facility.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Former LSU coach Johnny Jones hired by Texas Southern

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Johnny Jones is in charge of a college basketball program once again.

The former North Texas and LSU head coach will be the next head coach at Texas Southern, replacing Mike Davis, who left to take over at Detroit.

“I’m really excited about it,” Jones told Fox 26 in Houston. “This is a terrific opportunity with a great university in a great city.”

Jones went 90-72 in five seasons in Baton Rouge, but finished his final year, the 2016-17 season, with just a 10-21 record. He’s best-known for failing to get to the NCAA tournament with a team that featured Ben Simmons.

Coach K: ‘I have no plans to retire’

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Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski, the greatest college basketball coach this side of John Wooden, said on Monday that he has given on thought to the idea of when he will call it quits.

“I have no plans to retire,” Krzyzewski said on the College Hoops Today Podcast. “I feel better than I have in a long time. I feel healthier than I have in a long time. There’s no end in sight.”

The question of whether or not Coach K will be around all that much longer has been something that has lingered over the sport given the numerous health issues that he has dealt with in recent years. He’s undergone surgery six times in the last two years and, at 71 years old, is at an age where most everyone is hoping to retire while working one of the most strenuous and time-consuming jobs imaginable.

Put another way, no one would blame Krzyzewski if he wanted to hang it up.

But instead, he is arguably at the top of his game. He’s churned out elite recruiting classes in each of the last four seasons, he’s won two National Titles in the last eight seasons and he has three of the nation’s top five prospects enrolling for the 2018-19 season.

He’s not slowing down.

So why would he thinking about leaving the game?

VIDEO: Mixtape for Duke commit R.J. Barrett, potential 2019 No. 1 pick

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Last week, after the NBA draft officially concluded, we posted a mock draft for the lottery in 2019.

At the top of that list was R.J. Barrett, a Duke-commit and Canadian-native that has NBA scouts wowed and intrigued. This mixtape should give you a good feel for why.

Trae Jefferson to transfer out of Texas Southern

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Texas Southern guard and NCAA tournament darling Trae Jefferson announced on Saturday that he’s leaving the school.

The 5-foot-7 Jefferson was sensational at times during his sophomore season with the Tigers as he put up 23.1 points, 4.6 assists and 3.1 rebounds per game, helping lead Texas Southern to a victory in the 2018 NCAA Tournament’s First Four in Dayton over North Carolina Central. One of the most entertaining talents in college basketball, Jefferson is leaving Texas Southern in-part because former head coach Mike Davis took the job at Detroit this offseason.

While Detroit is going to be the favorite to land Jefferson, because of his connection to Davis, it’ll be interesting to see what his transfer market looks like. Jefferson also made it clear on his Twitter page that he would like to be closer to his hometown of Milwaukee so that he can be closer to his ailing grandfather.

Given NCAA transfer rules, Jefferson would likely have to sit out next season before getting two more years of eligibility. But he could be applying for a waiver if he’s trying to be closer to home to deal with his family situation.

Nevada’s Josh Hall transfers to Missouri State

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Nevada lost a talented player from last season’s team as rising junior Josh Hall opted to transfer to Missouri State on Friday night.

The 6-foot-7 Hall is a former top-150 recruit who played a key part in the Wolf Pack’s postseason run as he elevated his play to average 13 points and 4.7 rebounds per game during the 2018 NCAA Tournament. Hall also made the game-winning bucket to lift Nevada past No. 2 seed Cincinnati in the second round.

Although Hall picked up his play late in the year, he was coming off the bench most of his sophomore campaign as he averaged 6.9 points and 3.9 rebounds per game last season.

Since Nevada took in some talented transfers, while players like Jordan Caroline and the Martin twins opted not to turn pro, it left head coach Eric Musselman with too many scholarship players for the 2018-19 season. It looks like some of those issues are now going away as Hall is leaving for Missouri State and graduate transfer guard Ehab Amin opted to decommit from the school.

Nevada is expected to be a preseason top-10 team next season with all of the talent they have returning to the roster, along with the addition of some new pieces like McDonald’s All-American big man Jordan Brown.

Hall will likely have to sit out next season due to NCAA transfer rules as he still has two years of eligibility remaining.