Chris Walker’s academic issues explained?

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Every summer, after the recruitment process has finished and the newest crop of incoming freshman have decided where they want to play their college ball, college hoops plays the waiting game as each of those recruits finds out whether or not they will make it through the NCAA’s Clearinghouse.

Last year, it was Providence commit Ricardo Ledo that made the most headlines when he was declared ineligible for the 2012-2013 season, but he wasn’t the only top 100 recruit that had to take an academic redshirt. Chicken Knowles didn’t play for Houston this past season, and Washington State was without Demarquise Johnson. Terry Rozier ended up enrolling at a prep school instead of Louisville.

The year before, it was Jahii Carson of Arizona State, Ben McLemore from Kansas and three members of St. John’s recruiting class — Norvel Pelle, Amir Garrett and Jakaar Sampson — that were among the names not allowed to take the court as freshmen.

This year, the biggest name currently in eligibility limbo is Florida commit Chris Walker, a top ten player in the Class of 2013.

We’ve discussed Walker’s status before, but never the cause of his eligibility question marks. On Monday, Gary Parrish of CBSSports.com got to the bottom of it:

Walker’s father has forever been non-existent.

His mother essentially abandoned him years ago.

He’s spent his high school years living with a guardian named Jeneen Campbell and attending one of the state of Florida’s smallest public schools, mostly because he wanted to be loyal to the woman who was loyal to him. Walker could’ve transferred to any of the fancy basketball academies at any time over the past few years, and he would’ve probably benefited academically from it. But when you’ve been left by the adults whose top responsibility is to never leave you, it must be difficult to then turnaround and leave the one adult who didn’t. So Walker stayed with Campbell and at Holmes County High.

Holmes County High may be a fine high school, but it’s not one that is used to churning out Division I athletes. What that means is that Walker wasn’t enrolled in the classes as a freshman and sophomore that would put him on the right track to get eligible in the eyes of the NCAA. So he’s been forced to play catchup for the last couple of years, and he’s spending his summer working just as hard at getting the grades he needs in online courses as he is at improving his post game and adding some weight to his frame.

Florida is hoping for the best, and it seems that most people around Walker and the Florida program are cautiously optimistic.

The point here isn’t to absolve Walker of responsibility for his academic issues, because at the end of the days it’s his responsibility to get the grades he needs in the classes he needs to get them.

But it does put this situation into context.

Walker isn’t simply a case of a kid being lazy or dumb. He’s a product of his environment, and that goes for a number of the kids that have been ruled ineligible in recent years as well. Remember this story about Ben McLemore? His family was so poor growing up that 10 people lived in a 600 square foot apartment and they had to choose between using food stamps to eat or to sell to get money to keep the heat and the lights on.

You think a kid in that situation is going to be all that worried about his grades when college basketball is still years in the future?

As with any kid, sometimes there’s a reason for those academic problems beyond apathy.

You can find Rob on twitter @RobDauster.

Old Dominion lands former four-star center

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Elbert Robinson came out of high school in 2014 as a borderline top-50 recruit with offers from the likes of Florida, Kansas and Louisville before he ultimately chose to attend LSU.

The 7-foot-1 center, though, never even averaged 10 minutes a game in Baton Rouge and now will be finishing his career as a graduate transfer at Old Dominion, according to multiple reports.

“Old Dominion was perfect for him,” Lawrence Johns, Robinson’s grassroots coach, told the Virginian-Pilot. “I know for a fact that nobody in (Conference USA) is over 7 feet.

“I told him to go there and show people why he was the No. 1 center the year he came out.”

Robinson, who sat out last year for medical reasons, could step right into a major role with the Monarchs, who lost their starting frontcourt this offseason. He averaged 2.1 points and 1.4 rebounds in 6.4 minutes per game last year for the Tigers.

VIDEO: Mixtape for North Carolina-bound Nassir Little

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Nassir Little is one of the most improved players in the high school basketball ranks, going from being a guy that was a borderline five-star prospect to being a potential No. 1 pick in the 2019 NBA Draft.

At 6-foot-7 with a 7-foot-1 wingspan and athleticism to burn, he has all the makings of being one of the switchable wing defenders that are en vogue in the modern era of the NBA.

Former UNC star Phil Ford has surgery for prostate cancer

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CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina says former point guard Phil Ford has had surgery for prostate cancer.

Team spokesman Steve Kirschner said Wednesday that Ford underwent the procedure Tuesday after he was diagnosed during his annual physical. Dr. Eric Wallen, the UNC physician who is treating Ford, says the cancer was caught early because Ford “has been proactive regarding his health.”

Ford played for Dean Smith in the 1970s and scored 2,290 points, a mark that stood as the school record until Tyler Hansbrough broke it in 2008. Ford also spent 12 seasons as an assistant to Smith after a seven-year NBA career in which he was the rookie of the year in 1979.

Bruce Pearl: ‘Good chance’ Auburn returns four players testing the waters

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Bruce Pearl told reporters on Monday that there is a “good chance” that his Auburn program will return all four of the players that are currently testing the waters of the NBA draft.

“I think there’s a good chance they’re all going to consider coming back,” Pearl said. “There’s a chance they’re all going to come back, but that’s been the case since the beginning.”

“I just feel as we get closer to the deadline and they gather more and more information, I think that chance improves. It would not surprise me, still, to see a couple of them stay in.”

Those four players are Mustapha Heron, Austin Wiley, Bryce Brown and Jared Harper. Brown was the leading scorer for the Tigers last season, while Heron was arguably their best player and Harper a steady floor general that is the piece that holds everything together. Wiley did not play after he was ruled ineligible as a result of the FBI’s investigation into college basketball. If he returns he will be eligible to play the 2018-19 season.

Heron will be the most interesting decision of the four. A former McDonald’s All-American, when he declared for the draft last month, he announced that he intended to sign with an agent. But he has told reporters in the last week that he never actually signed and is still “50-50” on whether or not he will return. He was not invited to the NBA Draft Combine in Chicago last week. Wiley was, but he did not make enough of an impression to earn himself a first round guarantee. Brown and Harper are very unlikely to be drafted, but both juniors will get feedback from NBA teams on what they might need to do to play their way into the league.

Auburn is coming off of a year where they shared the SEC regular season title with Tennessee, but they struggled down the stretch of the season after Anfernee McLemore suffered a gruesome ankle injury. As it stands, under the assumption that Heron and Wiley are gone, we currently have the Tigers ranked as a top 15 team in the country in the NBC Sports Preseason Top 25.

With Heron and Wiley back, however, Auburn will have the pieces to make a case as one of college basketball’s five best teams next season.

Forward Lance Thomas transferring from Louisville

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With Anas Mahmoud out of eligibility and Ray Spalding having made the decision to enter the 2018 NBA Draft, new Louisville head coach Chris Mack had some holes to fill in the front court ahead of his first season at the helm. There’s now another departure to account for, as it was announced Tuesday afternoon that 6-foot-8 forward Lance Thomas has decided to transfer.

Thomas, who will have three seasons of eligibility remaining at his next school, appeared in 12 games for the Cardinals last season and averaged 2.2 points and 1.3 rebounds in 4.2 minutes per game.

Losing Thomas may not appear to be a big deal based upon his production as a freshman. But, given the combination of player departures and misses on the recruiting trail this spring it can also be argued that Louisville is not in a position where it can afford any more personnel losses.

Louisville is now down to four scholarship players in the front court, wings V.J. King and Jordan Nwora and forwards Malik Williams and Steven Enoch, with Enoch eligible after sitting out last season after transferring in from UConn.

Williams made 12 starts as a freshman, averaging 3.8 points and 2.4 rebounds in 10.6 minutes per game, with King averaging 8.6 points per game and Nwora 5.7 points per game. Enoch played in 29 games at UConn during the 2016-17 season, averaging 3.4 points and 2.3 rebounds in 12.1 minutes per appearance.