Kentucky player verifies Gillispie’s tough practice habits

6 Comments

By now, you know all about what Billy Gillispie is accused of. Details have come out about all-day practices at Texas Tech, as well as less-than-sound treatment of injured players – the last thing Texas Tech needs in the wake of the Mike Leach/Craig James football kerfuffle.

There are many surprising things about what’s going on, mostly in the vein of “how did you not see this coming?”

You’d think Gillispie, for one, would have reined himself in and avoided controversy. His reputation was in tatters after his time at Kentucky, he spent time out of the coaching game, and he had to know that a third chance wasn’t likely to present itself.

In similar fashion, you’d think that the AD at Tech would be super-duper careful about hiring a guy who had a rep for being rough on players. Again, the aforementioned issue with a concussed player, his famous father, and a potentially dangerous dose of discipline probably should have had everyone walking on eggshells regarding the next big hire.

But Gillispie is accused of being a recidivist, and as often happens when someone breaks the barrier of silence in these matters, more accusers are coming out of the woodwork to pile on.

The Lexington Herald-Leader published a report today based on a conversation with former Kentucky walk-on Dusty Miller, who confirmed that his time under Gillispie had much in common with what Texas Tech players have allegedly gone through.

“I was not surprised by one thing I read,” Mills told the paper. “Nothing was outrageous to me.”

Mills said he was not privy to conversations between Gillispie and other UK players, but confirmed that stars like Patrick Patterson and Jodie Meeks often appeared to be practicing while injured, and did not seem happy to be doing so.

“Physically, they were playing in pain, and it was hard to watch at times.”

Mills was kicked off the team by Gillispie, but denies that he has an axe to grind. He praised Gillispie’s coaching ability, and thanked him for giving him the opportunity to join the Wildcats as a walk-on. Still, he couldn’t bring himself to exonerate or fully understand Gillispie’s coaching style.
“I think he does really care for his players,” Mills said. “I think he does. He just has a very odd way of showing it. Obviously, something is going on there, and I’m not sure what it is.”