College Hoops Week in Review: Player of the Week

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Team of the Week

Five Thoughts

Co-Players of the Week: Anthony Davis, Kentucky, and Thomas Robinson, Kansas

The National Player of the Year debate has been whittled down to just two plays — Thomas Robinson and Anthony Davis — and this past week, both of them proved why they are in the center of the debate. It started Saturday afternoon with Anthony Davis, the nation’s most intimidating defense presence, who followed up a 13-point, 11-rebound performance against Mississippi State with 28 points (on 10-11 shooting), 11 boards and five blocks as the Wildcats knocked off Vanderbilt and clinched the regular season title in the SEC. The performance was enough to get my colleague Mike Miller to say “at this rate, Davis is going to be the top player taken in the 2012 NBA draft and snag the national Player of the Year award from Kansas’ Thomas Robinson.”

Oh, you didn’t think T-Rob had an answer? He did, lighting up Missouri to the tune of 28 points and 12 boards, including a number of big buckets in crunch time as the Jayhawks fought all the way back from 19 points down in the second half to beat Missouri and all-but seal up the Big 12 regular season title. It certainly helped that Robinson had this kind of performance in arguably the best game of the season to date when the nation’s attention was focused on him.

So who you got? Who is the player of they year? While Davis clearly has an advantage with what he brings to the table defensively as a shot-blocker, Robinson may answer that with the way that he cleans the defensive glass as Jeff Withey plays the role of rim-protector for the Jayhawks. Robinson also carries a bigger load for his team offensively, as Davis has much more talent surrounding him and, at times, is really only used to finish alley-oops offensively.

At this point, my honest opinion is that there is no winner. I think the award should be split, much the way that this weekly award is split. (See? It can be done.) But if I had to bet on who would win, my money is on Robinson. His story is just too inspiring.

The All-They-Were-Good-Too Team:

G: Kendall Marshall, North Carolina: Marshall had what may be the most impressive performance from a point guard this season in UNC’s 86-74 win over NC State on Tuesday. 22 points, 13 assists, 7-8 from the floor, 4-5 from three and not a single turnover to his name. That’s unbelievable, and I don’t care how bad the Wolfpack is. While Marshall wasn’t nearly as impressive in the Heel’s win at Virginia on Saturday — one points, six assists, two turnovers — he did enough on Tuesday to warrant inclusion here.

G: Jamaal Franklin, San Diego State: Franklin injured his ankle late in SDSU’s loss to New Mexico two weeks ago. It was bad enough that he was forced to miss the Aztec’s loss at Air Force last Saturday, but Franklin was able to return to the court this week. He started out slowly, finishing with just 12 points in an overtime win at Wyoming, helping SDSU erase a nine-point second half lead, before going for 31 points and 16 boards in a win over Colorado State. The MWC is tough this year, and those are two good wins.

F: Jae Crowder, Marquette: Crowder is becoming a main-stay on this list and quickly making people rethink voting Kevin Jones Player of the Year in the Big East. Crowder was the model of efficiency against Rutgers on Wednesday, as he went for 27 points (on 11-14 shooting), seven boards, four assists, four steals and three blocks. That’s not a bad all-around game. He followed that up with 26 points, four boards, two blocks and two steals in a come-from-behind win over West Virginia where four different Marquette players were suspended for at least a half.

F: Robbie Hummel, Purdue: It really should be no surprise that, as Purdue has made a run to get themselves into perfect position for the NCAA Tournament, Robbie Hummel has looked like the old Robbie Hummel. After going for 29 points and seven boards in a win over Nebraska, he followed that up with 19 points and nine boards as the Boilermakers knocked off Michigan in Ann Arbor, giving themselves their first win of the season of a top team in the Big Ten.

C: Andrew Nicholson, St. Bonaventure: The Bonnies look like they’re peaking at the right time thanks to Nicholson, who is playing his best basketball of the season. After 30-point, nine-rebound performance in a win at Fordham, Nicholoson went for 25 points, 11 boards, three blocks and two steals. All of a sudden, their game against St. Joe’s to close out the regular season looks huge.

Rob Dauster is the editor of the college basketball website Ballin’ is a Habit. You can find him on twitter @robdauster.

Tennessee beats Duke to commitment for five-star prospect

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Tennessee’s Rick Barnes is up to his old recruiting tricks.

The man that brought the likes of Kevin Durant and T.J. Ford to Texas, the coach that is currently the reigning SEC regular season championship, has gotten things going in the Class of 2019 as five-star guard Josiah James committed to Tennessee on Wednesday.

James picked the Vols over Clemson and Duke. He visited Tennessee the first weekend of September and took a trip to Clemson last weekend before cancelling his visit to Duke and announcing his commitment.

A top 15 prospect in the Class of 2019, James is a 6-foot-6 left-handed combo-guard. He’s more of a smooth athlete than he is super-explosive, but he has a strong frame that can absorb contact, the vision to create for teammates and the tools to be a switchable and versatile defensive piece. He needs to get more skilled — he’s not a great shooter, and while he is a good passer and creator, his handle could stand to get better if he truly wants to be a lead guard — but the potential is there for James to blossom into a first round pick one day.

James is the third commitment for Tennessee in the Class of 2019, joining a pair of three-star forwards in Drew Pember and Davonte Gaines.

This has been an incredible 12-month stretch for Barnes.

In his third season as the head coach of Tennessee, he took the Vols to a share of the SEC regular season title with a team that didn’t have a single player on the roster that was a top 100 prospect in high school. Everyone of significance from that team returned to the program, meaning that Barnes now has a preseason top 10 team heading into the 2018-19 season.

And now he’s beating out the likes of Duke and Michigan State for a five-star, potential one-and-done player?

Impressive.

Washington lands second 2019 verbal commitment

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With three of its four seniors heading into the 2018-19 season being perimeter players, Washington has some holes to address in its 2019 recruiting class. Thus far Mike Hopkins and his staff have done just that, with both of the program’s commits to date being perimeter players.

The second verbal commitment was received Tuesday afternoon, as three-star combo guard Marcus Tsohonis announced that he will be a Husky. Tsohonis, a Jefferson HS (Portland, Oregon) product who played his grassroots basketball for Seattle Rotary Elite on the Nike EYBL circuit, joins four-star wing RaeQuan Battle in Washington’s 2019 class to date.

The 6-foot-4 Tsohonis, who can play on or off the ball, held offers from multiple Pac-12 programs but ultimately made the decision to make the trek north from Portland to Seattle for his collegiate career. His verbal commitment comes on the heels of an official visit to Washington that was taken this past weekend.

As noted above Washington will loose some key contributors on the perimeter after the upcoming season, with David Crisp, Mathysse Thybulle and Dominic Green all entering their final season of eligibility (big man Noah Dickerson is also a senior). The additions of Tsohonis and Battle should help Washington when it comes to filling those holes and continuing to build upon the foundation laid during Hopkins’ first season at the helm.

Four-star guard becomes LSU’s first 2019 commit

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Expected to be a factor both within the SEC and nationally this season, these are good times for the LSU men’s basketball program. Head coach Will Wade and his staff received more good news Tuesday, as 6-foot-2 combo guard James Bishop (Baltimore, Maryland/Mount St. Joseph HS) announced that he will be a Tiger next season.

Bishop, considered to be one of the top scoring guards in the class, is LSU’s first 2019 verbal commitment. Bishop’s pledge comes just over a week after his official visit to LSU, and just days after a visit to St. John’s. LSU beat out St. John’s, NC State, Marquette and VCU in the race for the Baltimore product, and given the Tigers’ current roster this is an important commitment.

LSU’s 2018 recruiting class is considered to be one of the nation’s best, with point guard Javonte Smart being one of the five-star prospects in that quintet (forwards Naz Reid and Emmitt Williams being the others). Add in sophomore Tremont Waters, who’s coming off of an outstanding freshman season, and LSU could be in a position next summer where its top two lead guards are at the very least testing the NBA draft waters.

Landing Bishop gives LSU another talented option, and some cover should the program lose either Waters or Smart — or both — in 2019.

Calhoun officially named head coach at DIII St. Joseph

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WEST HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Jim Calhoun has officially been named the head coach at Division III University of Saint Joseph in Connecticut.

The Hall of Famer had already announced he would be taking the job and has been working for a year to establish a men’s basketball program at the small Catholic university, which was an all-women’s school until this school year.

Calhoun also has continued to serve in an advisory role at UConn, where he served as coach for 26 seasons and led the Huskies to three of their four national titles before retiring in 2012.

The 76-year-old will return to the sidelines with a career record of 873-380 when the Blue Jays open the season on Nov. 9 against William Paterson University.

That game will be played at Trinity College in Hartford, which has a gym that seats about 2,200 people, about 1,000 more than the gymnasium at Saint Joseph.

Oregon State announces addition of transfer Payton Dastrup

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Tuesday afternoon Oregon State announced that former BYU power forward Payton Dastrup has joined the program as a transfer. Dastrup, who averaged 3.3 points and 1.8 rebounds in just under eight minutes per game last season, has two seasons of eligibility remaining. Oregon State will file a waiver on his behalf in hopes that Dastrup will be granted immediate eligibility.

Should the waiver request be denied, Dastrup will not be eligible to play until the 2019-20 season. For Oregon State’s sake, even with Dastrup’s career numbers he would fill a need for a team that bid farewell to its best big man during the spring.

Drew Eubanks’ decision to turn pro left a noticeable hole in Oregon State’s interior rotation, with senior Gligorije Rakocevic and junior Ben Kone being the most experienced returnees. Those two combined to average 3.1 points and 3.5 rebounds per game in 2017-18, with Rakocevic averaging 10.6 minutes per game in 27 appearances off the bench.

In addition to those two the Beavers add three scholarship newcomers to the mix this season in junior college transfer Kylor Kelley and freshmen Warren Washington and Jack Wilson. Dastrup has the ability to step away from the basket, which would give Oregon State a little versatility in the interior to go along with a perimeter/wing rotation led by Tres Tinkle, Stephen Thompson Jr. and Ethan Thompson.