Blogger Spotlight: Big Ten Geeks on Hummel, Ohio St. and Meatheads

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It used to be there was one tempo-free guru for Big Ten hoops. Now there are scads, but only two of them have a sweet blogging gig at Big Ten Network. It’s not the only thing Mike Portscheller and Josh Reed do for a living, but it’s certainly their favorite. Why else churn through mounds of data and watch every conference game – yes, even Penn State-Iowa – unless you love it?

That’s life for the Big Ten Geeks. They dissect games, box scores and performances, then write about it with a healthy dose of perspective and insight. (And a dash of sarcasm.)  Their Twitter feed is essentially the same, just more concise.

Now that conference play has begun in college basketball’s best conference (yes, it’s true; sorry Big East), Josh took some time to answer a few questions in the latest Blogger Spotlight. (Mike was busy blogging.)

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Q: The Big Ten was the top conference last season (regular season at least) and seems to be heading that way again this year. What’s brought about this rise? Retention of players? Coaching stability? Or just a rise in overall play?

A: I think it is the retention of players, and it really had a lot to do with the class of 2007. That particular class is one that won’t be matched anytime soon, and the Big Ten benefited from its 2007 members sticking around for a while. Of the top 100 from that class, the Big Ten captured 18. Of those, only 5 hung around for fewer than 3 seasons.

But now the class of 2007 is all but gone, with Robbie Hummel as the John Uncas of the group (after Trevor Mbakwe’s injury). But because they hung around so long, they limited opportunities for younger guys. Since the class of 2007, only three players from the subsequent classes have declared for the draft. Players are much more likely to transfer in search of more playing time, than to leave.

Q: Tell me someone can give Ohio State a run for the conference title. (Assuming Jared Sullinger’s healthy). Who’s that team?

A: We’re the Big Ten Geeks, not the Big Ten Eye Test Meatheads, so absolutely someone can give them a shot, and the team in the best position to do so is Wisconsin. Sure, even Ken Pomeroy doesn’t seem that thrilled with his computer’s assessment of the Badgers, but scheduling matters. Bo Ryan’s team plays Indiana, Purdue, Northwestern and Michigan each only once. This is a stark contrast to Ohio State, which sees only one game against each of Penn State, Purdue, Iowa, and Minnesota. And the computer might be on to something — in 12 of their 14 games, the opponent has had its worst or second-worst offensive night (by points per possession) against the Badgers. In those other two games, it was still only the third and fifth-worst offensive showing of their opponent.

I’d also keep a close eye on Indiana, which gave Michigan State all it could handle at the Breslin Center. Sure, the Hoosiers probably won’t shoot 46 percent from three-point range all season, but this is an offense not to take lightly.

Q: Plus, Big Ten Eye Test Meatheads doesn’t really roll off the tongue or make for an easy Twitter handle. If Indiana and Wisconsin are two teams to watch, which teams aren’t as good as their records? I’m leaning Northwestern and Illinois …

A: Northwestern is a solid pick, certainly. Usually it’s the teams certain to finish near the bottom of the conference have 4 or more losses upon entering conference play, but those aren’t the only squads that will do more losing than winning from here on out. Northwestern is certainly one of those — we don’t see any reason to be excited about that defense.

Illinois is a bit of a strange case. In just about every game against non-cupcakes, they’ve played to the opponents’ level. Maryland, Gonzaga, St. Bonaventure, Minnesota, Illinois State, Richmond, and even the elite Missouri. They haven’t blown any of these teams out, but UNLV is the only team that’s clearly outplayed them. This usually isn’t a résumé that belongs to a top-20 team, but we wouldn’t count the Illini out of the Dance just yet.

Another good candidate is Minnesota. They’ve played better without Mbakwe, but that’s probably a fluke. Conference play means your opponent has read the book on you, and Minnesota’s book says it can’t shoot.

Q: When March rolls around, how many Big Ten teams are really Final Four contenders? I’ve been impressed with how well Indiana and Michigan State have played thus far, while Wisconsin and Michigan are teams who should be Top 20 mainstays. Yet I can’t shake the feeling that they’re all limited and ultimately doomed to “only” reach the Sweet 16. One might sneak into the Elite Eight. (As if either is a failure.) Either of you have that feeling or am I just being stubborn?

A: It’s true that no Big Ten team is perfect. But no team is. Is Kentucky too young? Can UNC beat you from outside? Does Brad Stevens have any more magic dust?

If last year taught us anything, it’s that all you need is eligibility. How else could a 9th seed in the Big East win it all, or the 4th-best team in the Colonial end up in the Final Four? I’m confident that the Big Ten will have several teams at the end of the year with better résumés. That’s not to say the Big Ten is filled with teams just hoping to get hot at the right time. Ohio State is obviously loaded, and again, offensive guru Bo Ryan appears to have himself an elite defense. That’s not fair.

Q: How often do you guys find yourselves defending the league’s “slow” image? Or do you even bother? After all, if playing “slow” yielded results such as Wisconsin’s, we should all be so lucky, right?

A: It comes with the territory. One-half of the Geeks actually grew up an ACC fan, so learning to love the Big Ten’s pace was a process. Contrary to a common viewpoint, the league is not slow for lack of athletes. Rather, it’s slow because just about every team is obsessed with not giving up easy baskets. The only team with a long track record of throwing caution into the wind in order to crash the offensive glass is Michigan State. And it bears mentioning that, despite recruiting a bevy of talent to East Lansing, that approach doesn’t always work out for Tom Izzo (for example, last season).

It’s necessarily a subjective discussion, but our preference is for efficient basketball — a game with a minimum of careless turnovers, defensive lapses, and missed open shots and free throws. That kind of game can be played at any speed.

Q: Best player in the league? Jordan Taylor? Jared Sullinger? Draymond Green? Someone else? I’d go Green because I love how he’s emerged as a scorer this year, but maybe I’m biased. Always been a sucker for guys who a little bit of everything then do it all even better as a senior. (My heartstrings also get tugged by Hummel.)

A: Taylor was our preseason pick for conference player of the year, but Carlton has struggled with his shot all season. It’s remarkable that he’s still very efficient despite his inaccuracy. Sullinger is an easy pick, especially because his defense has improved quite a bit.

As much as we like watching Green play, the past season and a half have shown that he was probably better suited with a little less responsibility in the offense. As the focal point, his accuracy has suffered.

If Hummel stays healthy all year, it’s probably a two-man race with Sullinger (expand to three if Taylor finds his shot). A darkhorse candidate is Michigan’s Tim Hardaway Jr.

Q: I once asked this to KJ from The Only Colors, so I’ll ask you guys too: I swear a vast percentage of the best college hoops blogs are based around Big Ten teams. Agree? And how does that happen?

A: If Dean Smith invented tempo free, Dean Oliver taught us how to calculate the numbers, and Ken Pomeroy brought the numbers to the masses, then it was John Gasaway who spread the word and told us what the numbers meant. The reason so many people got into this stuff is because the Wonk was so fun. It was a must-read for Big Ten fans, and when the Wonk went geeky, we all followed.

Q: So. About the blog. Why did you guys start? What’s a typical week look like for you in terms of workload? How’d you settle on the name? Do you ever worry about those eye-test meatheads beating you up?

A: We started largely because the Wonk stopped. We were used to reading about Big Ten hoops every morning at that URL, and then one day John decided the Big Ten wasn’t enough, and there wasn’t as much to read. Moreover, the stuff that was out there seemed so antiquated in comparison to all this tempo-free we’d been digesting. The blog was actually my idea, but I didn’t want to go it alone, so I recruited Mike. We actually didn’t even know each other prior to starting the blog — we just bumped into each other on message boards.

Regarding workload for a typical week, we watch every single conference game. Keep in mind, we both have real jobs outside of the blog, so this can be a challenge. But even if it’s two cellar-dwellers facing off in a meaningless battle in late February, we’re watching at least a good portion of that. Our job isn’t just to summarize the numbers, it’s to make sense of them. And it’s hard to do that just from box scores.

We also try to do more than just recap what went right and what didn’t. We want to inform our readings of trends, oddities, and things to look for going forward. That means our workload really varies depending on how inspiration strikes. If there’s a lot of data mining involved, it could take hours to write a single post. There’s one in the works right now that several weeks of data collection. But sometimes it’s 30 minutes.

Mike came up with the name. It sounded better than “nerd.” We don’t spend too much time worrying about Eye Test Meatheads like Gregg Doyel beating us up. We just got a new alarm system set up in Mom’s Basement.

Q: How long do you guys envision doing this? Blogging can be a grind, but it seems you guys relish having a narrow focus on specific timeframe in which you write.

A: It has to end, right? We can’t be doing this when we’re 60 (for one, the Big Ten will be about 36 teams by then. And still called the Big Ten.). For now though, it’s still fun. BTN has been really great too, they don’t censor us or tell us what to write, and they’ve supported us wherever we’ve asked. It’s been a great partnership.

And I think the narrow focus helps us, too. We don’t have to know whether Miami is going to shoot a lot of threes this season. We have our familiar teams with their familiar tendencies. Ohio State won’t dig deep into the bench, Wisconsin plays slow, Purdue and Illinois defend, Michigan State crashes the glass, Northwestern shoots threes, Michigan spreads the floor, Iowa wants to run, Minnesota utilizes depth, and so on. The basic philosophies don’t change, so we don’t have to relearn all that stuff. Just focus on the challenges for the teams for each new season.

More of the Geeks’ work can be found here at BTN.com. Follow them on Twitter @bigtengeeks.

You also can follow me on Twitter @MikeMillerNBC.

Zach Edey has 19 points, No. 1 Purdue beats Michigan 75-70

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Junfu Han/USA TODAY NETWORK
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ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Zach Edey had 15 of his 19 points in the first half and Fletcher Loyer finished with 17 points to help No. 1 Purdue hold off Michigan 75-70 on Thursday night.

The Boilermakers (20-1, 9-1 Big Ten) had a 15-0 run to go ahead 41-28 lead in the first half after there were 10 lead changes and four ties, but they couldn’t pull away.

The Wolverines (11-9, 5-4) were without standout freshman Jett Howard, who missed the game with an ankle injury, and still hung around until the final seconds.

Joey Baker made a 3-pointer – off the glass – with 5.9 seconds left to pull Michigan within three points, but Purdue’s Brandon Newman sealed the victory with two free throws.

Purdue coach Matt Painter said Michigan slowed down Edey in the second half by pushing him away from the basket.

“They got him out a little more, and got him bottled up,” Painter said.

The 7-foot-4 Edey, though, was too tough to stop early in the game.

“He’s one of the best in the country for a reason,” Michigan coach Juwan Howard said. “He’s very effective, especially if he’s 8 feet and in.”

With size and skills such as a hook shot, the junior center from Toronto scored Purdue’s first seven points and finished the first half 7 of 12 from the field and 1 of 2 at the line.

“He did a great job in the first half, going to his right shoulder and using his left hand,” Painter said. “He made four baskets with his left hand which is huge.”

Freshman Braden Smith had 10 points for the Boilermakers.

Purdue’s defense ultimately denied Michigan’s comeback hopes, holding a 22nd straight opponent to 70 or fewer points.

Hunter Dickinson scored 21, Kobe Bufkin had 16 points and Baker added 11 points for the Wolverines, who have lost four of their last six games.

Dickinson, a 7-1 center, matched up with Edey defensively and pulled him out of the lane offensively by making 3 of 7 3-pointers.

“Half his shots were from the 3, and that’s a little different,” Painter said. “His meat and potatoes are on that block. He’s the real deal.”

POLL IMPLICATIONS

The Boilermakers got the top spot in the AP Top 25 this week after winning six games, a stretch that followed a loss to Rutgers on Jan. 3 that dropped them from No. 1 in the poll. Purdue improved to 7-2 as the top-ranked team.

BIG PICTURE

Purdue: Edey can’t beat teams by himself and he’s surrounded by a lot of role players and a potential standout in Loyer. The 6-4 guard was the Big Ten player of the week earlier this month, become the first Boilermaker freshman to win the award since Robbie Hummel in 2008.

“Fletcher is somebody who has played better in the second half, and on the road,” Painter said.

Michigan: Jett Howard’s health is a critical factor for the Wolverines, who will have some work to do over the second half of the Big Ten season to avoid missing the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2015. Howard averages 14.6 points and is the most dynamic player on his father’s team.

ROAD WARRIORS

The Boilermakers were away from home for 12 of 23 days, winning all five of their road games. They won at Ohio State, Michigan State and Michigan for the first time since the 1997-98 season and beat the Spartans and Wolverines on their home court in the same season for the first time in 12 years.

UP NEXT

Purdue: Hosts Michigan State on Sunday, nearly two weeks after the Boilermakers beat the Spartans by a point on Edey’s shot with 2.2 seconds left.

Michigan: Plays at Penn State on Sunday.

Miller scores 23, No. 10 Maryland tops No. 13 Michigan 72-64

Trevor Ruszkowski-USA TODAY Sports
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COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Diamond Miller scored 23 points, and No. 10 Maryland closed the first quarter with a 13-2 run and led the rest of the way in a 72-64 victory over No. 13 Michigan on Thursday night.

Abby Meyers contributed 12 points and 11 rebounds for the Terrapins (17-4, 8-2), who won for the 10th time in 11 games. Lavender Briggs scored 14 points and Shyanne Sellers added 13.

Maryland gained a measure of revenge after losing twice to Michigan last season – including a 20-point rout in College Park.

Leigha Brown led the Wolverines with 16 points.

Michigan (16-5, 6-4) led 13-9 in the first quarter before a three-point play by Miller started Maryland’s big run. Briggs and Faith Masonius made 3-pointers during that stretch.

The Terps pushed the lead to 16 in the third quarter before the Wolverines were able to chip away. Miller sat for a bit with four fouls, and Michigan cut the lead to seven in the fourth quarter, but the Wolverines still wasted too many possessions with turnovers to mount much of a comeback.

Michigan ended up with 24 turnovers, and Maryland had a 25-5 advantage in points off turnovers.

Miller fouled out with 2:19 remaining, but even after those two free throws, the Terps led 65-57 and had little trouble holding on.

Michigan lost for the second time in four days against a top-10 opponent. No. 6 Indiana beat the Wolverines 92-83 on Monday.

BIG PICTURE

Michigan: Whether it was against Maryland’s press or in their half-court offense, the Wolverines turned the ball over too much to score consistently. This was a lower-scoring game than the loss to Indiana, but the margin ended up being similar.

Maryland: While Miller clearly led the way, the Terps had plenty of offensive contributors. They also held Michigan to 13 points below its season average entering the game.

POLL IMPLICATIONS

The Wolverines have appeared in 48 straight AP polls, and although a two-loss week could certainly drop them, the quality of their opponents could save them from a substantial plunge.

Maryland is tied for 10th with an Iowa team that beat No. 2 Ohio State on Monday night. Now the Terps can boast an impressive victory of their own.

UP NEXT

Michigan: The Wolverines play their third game of the week when they visit Minnesota on Sunday.

Maryland: The Terps host Penn State on Monday night.

 

Boum, Jones lead No. 13 Xavier over No. 19 UConn, 82-79

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STORRS, Conn. – Souley Boum scored 21 points, Colby Jones added 20 and No. 13 Xavier went on the road and held off No. 19 Connecticut 82-79 Wednesday night.

The win was the 13th in 14 games for the Musketeers (17-4, 9-1 Big East) and it gave them a season sweep over the struggling Huskies (16-6, 5-6).

Jack Nunge had 12 points and Jerome Hunter added 11 for Xavier, which led by 17 in the first half and 39-24 at halftime.

Jordan Hawkins scored 26 of his 28 points in the second half for UConn, leading a comeback that fell just short.

Tristen Newton added 23 points for the Huskies, who won their first 14 games this season but have dropped six of eight since.

The Musketeers never trailed but had to withstand UConn runs that cut the lead to a single point four times in the second half.

A three-point play from Hawkins made it 78-77 with 2:40 left. But a second-chance layup from Nunge put the lead at 80-77 just over a minute later.

Newton was fouled with two seconds left by Desmond Claude, but his apparent attempt to miss his second free throw went into the basket.

Boum then hit two free throws at the other end, and Newton’s final attempt from just beyond halfcourt was well short.

Xavier jumped out to a 9-0 lead as UConn missed its first nine shots.

A 3-pointer from Zach Freemantle gave the Musketeers their first double-digit lead at 20-9, and another from Jones pushed it to 35-18.

BIG PICTURE

Xavier: The Musketeers lead the Big East, and the win over UConn was their ninth conference victory this season, eclipsing their total from last season.

UConn: The Huskies came in with a 17-game winning streak at Gampel Pavilion dating to February 2021. They fell to 1-4 against the four teams in front of them in the Big East standings. The lone win came at Gampel against Creighton.

UP NEXT

Xavier: The Musketeers continue their road trip with a visit to Creighton on Saturday.

UConn: Doesn’t play again until next Tuesday, when the Huskies visit DePaul.

No. 12 Iowa State holds on to beat No. 5 Kansas State 80-76

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AMES, Iowa – Jaren Holmes matched his season high with 23 points as No. 12 Iowa State held on to beat No. 5 Kansas State 80-76 on Tuesday night.

The Cyclones (15-4, 6-2 Big 12) moved into a three-way tie atop the conference standings with the Wildcats and Texas.

Gabe Kalscheur added 19 points for Iowa State. Osun Osunniyi finished with 16.

Markquis Nowell led Kansas State (17-3, 6-2) with 23 points.

A 3-pointer from Holmes gave Iowa State a 59-49 advantage with 8:12 remaining. Kansas State responded with a 10-1 run to trim the margin to 60-59.

Caleb Grill’s 3-pointer steadied the Cyclones and pushed the lead back to 63-59 with five minutes left.

Free throws by Osunniyi, Grill and Holmes sealed the victory in the final 24 seconds.

The first half featured eight lead changes and ended with Kansas State up 33-31.

A 3-pointer by Kalscheur ignited an early 9-0 run for the Cyclones and helped them build a 19-14 lead. Iowa State made just one of nine 3-point tries in the first 20 minutes.

BIG PICTURE

Kansas State was trying to extend its best start to a season since 1961-62.

Iowa State improved to 11-0 at home. The Cyclones have not lost back-to-back games this season.

UP NEXT

Kansas State hosts Florida on Saturday as part of the SEC/Big 12 Challenge.

Iowa State travels to Missouri on Saturday.

Georgetown snaps 29-game conference losing streak

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WASHINGTON – Primo Spears scored 21 points and Georgetown snapped a 29-game conference losing streak with an 81-76 victory over DePaul on Tuesday night.

Georgetown (6-15, 1-9) won its first Big East game since March 13, 2021, ending the longest skid in the history of the conference. The Hoyas also ended a 10-game losing streak this season.

Spears also contributed six assists for the Hoyas. Akok Akok scored 12 points and added six rebounds and four blocks and Brandon Murray recorded 12 points.

Umoja Gibson led the Blue Demons (9-12, 3-7) in scoring, finishing with 24 points, four assists and three steals. Javan Johnson added 13 points.

Spears scored nine points in the first half and Georgetown went into the break trailing 37-36. Georgetown used a 10-0 run in the second half to build a 12-point lead at 75-63 with 1:39 remaining.