Player of the Year debate: Jimmer or Nolan?

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It’s one of those years where the tired cliché applies: There are so many guys worthy of Player of the Year, it’s a shame there’ll only be one.

So we figured, why not have more than one?

Ken Davis already argued the candidacy of Connecticut superhero Kemba Walker, while Rob Dauster proclaimed Duke’s Nolan Smith his top player. Me? I go with the no-brainer in Jimmer Fredette. But what fun would it be if we merely proclaimed our winners? Why not argue about it?

Mike: I love me some Nolan Smith. He’s probably the best all-around player this season, but how can you go against Jimmer Fredette? BYU’s senior guard not only leads the nation in scoring, but jaw-dropping shots, plays and expectations. The guy’s a force of nature. And if there’s anything I learned this winter, it’s that you can’t fight nature. It always wins.

Rob: Jimmer has been incredible. I’m not arguing that. There isn’t a more exciting player in the country to watch. Ankle breaking cross-overs into 30 foot pull up threes? Yes, please.

The issue I have with Jimmer is that he not only doesn’t play any defense, he doesn’t even try. The next time BYU plays, watch him on the defensive end of the floor. He’ll stand in the same spot for entire possessions.

Mike: He stands in the same spot because every team has some chump he usually doesn’t have to pay that much attention to. And it’s not like he’s a chump. He averages more steals a game (1.4 to 1.3) than Smith. Plus, the Cougars often throw a zone to there to give Jimmer some breathing room. And now that Brandon Davies won’t be playing anymore, expect BYU to use even more zone, thus minimizing Jimmer’s biggest deficiency.

And besides, Jimmer’s doing even more on offense lately. Nine assists vs. SDSU? Seven vs. UNLV? Guy is unstoppable even when he’s not shooting. Smith can’t control a game like that.

Rob: I disagree. I think Smith absolutely can control a game like that, and he does. He just doesn’t need too put up the numbers Jimmer does with the weapons that he has on the floor with him. That’s not to say he doesn’t put up numbers — he’s 0.1 rpg away from joining Tu Holloway and Norris Cole as the only players that average 20 ppg, 5 rpg, and 5 apg.

When Duke is at their best, Nolan Smith is the guy making all of the plays. And down the stretch, he’s just about the only guy on the Duke roster that touches the ball. What I think is the most impressive about Smith is that he is having this much success playing a role that he wasn’t supposed to coming into the season.

Mike: But it’s a roll he’s played before. It’s impressive to see how far Smith’s come as a creator. As a sophomore, he was the starting point guard, then got demoted. During the NCAA tournament run last year, Smith was the one creating with the ball.

But I think it’s far easier to create when you’ve got guys like Kyle Singler, Seth Curry and Andre Dawkins to pass to. Jackson Emery and Charles Abouo are nice players, but they rely on Fredette creating their open looks at the basket. If the Cougars make the Final Four, it’ll be because of Fredette. If Duke makes it, it’s not all on Smith.  

Rob: If BYU is all Fredette, then they aren’t going to make the Final Four. The Cougars went into Viejas Arena and beat SDSU by 13, and while Jimmer had 25 points and 9 assists, they won because the other guys, namely Charles Abouo, played very well. I also don’t think it is fair to detract from a player based on how good his teammates are.

The best player in the country isn’t necessarily the most valuable or the most important player. If that were the case, then shouldn’t we also include Charles Jenkins or Tu Holloway or Norris Cole in the conversation?

Mike: The best player is all of those things. He’s the most important, most valuable and the best player on the court. That’s Fredette. I mean, the guy is a phenomenon college hoops is lucky enough to see every few years.

The biggest test might not even be how the Cougars play without Davies. It’ll be if Fredette has enough juice left in his legs. The guy’s been playing at such a high level all season, I worry he’s gassed just when most of the country will be watching. And that’s a shame.

Rob: I agree with everything in that last paragraph. He is the single most exciting player in the country to watch. Its an event when he plays. He’s a show man with a flair for the dramatic, usually in the form of contested 30 foot leaners off the dribble. But entertainment value does not make you the player of the year.

Is Blake Griffin now the NBA MVP? Smith is a better defender. He’s a better leader. Since Kyrie Irving went down, he’s boosted his average to 23.5 ppg. Let’s see what Jimmer does without Davies.

Mike: If one game’s any indication, he’ll have to do more than ever. BYU got manhandled by New Mexico Wednesday night for just their third loss of the season (and second against the Lobos). Fredette’s shot wasn’t falling early, but his teammates were worse. Consider BYU’s next few games the ultimate test of his Player of the Year worthiness. If Fredette can’t get them at least two NCAA tournament wins, maybe he’s not worthy of this.

But I’ll take my chances. You don’t bet against the Jimmer.

You also can follow me on Twitter @MikeMillerNBC.

Nevada’s Josh Hall transfers to Missouri State

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Nevada lost a talented player from last season’s team as rising junior Josh Hall opted to transfer to Missouri State on Friday night.

The 6-foot-7 Hall is a former top-150 recruit who played a key part in the Wolf Pack’s postseason run as he elevated his play to average 13 points and 4.7 rebounds per game during the 2018 NCAA Tournament. Hall also made the game-winning bucket to lift Nevada past No. 2 seed Cincinnati in the second round.

Although Hall picked up his play late in the year, he was coming off the bench most of his sophomore campaign as he averaged 6.9 points and 3.9 rebounds per game last season.

Since Nevada took in some talented transfers, while players like Jordan Caroline and the Martin twins opted not to turn pro, it left head coach Eric Musselman with too many scholarship players for the 2018-19 season. It looks like some of those issues are now going away as Hall is leaving for Missouri State and graduate transfer guard Ehab Amin opted to decommit from the school.

Nevada is expected to be a preseason top-10 team next season with all of the talent they have returning to the roster, along with the addition of some new pieces like McDonald’s All-American big man Jordan Brown.

Hall will likely have to sit out next season due to NCAA transfer rules as he still has two years of eligibility remaining.

Chris Webber accepts Jim Harbaugh’s invitation to be honorary Michigan football captain

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The frosty relationship between Chris Webber and the University of Michigan could be thawing — thanks to an invitation from football head coach Jim Harbaugh.

On Friday, Harbaugh called in to WTKA’s “The M Zone” as show host Jamie Morris had Webber on the show. Harbaugh offered Webber the opportunity to be an honorary captain for the Michigan football team next season, to which Webber replied that he would love the opportunity.

Webber, a former member of the “Fab Five” who helped the Wolverines to two consecutive NCAA tournament title-game appearances in 1992 and 1993, has not associated directly with the school, or with other members of the Fab Five, for many years.

The NCAA mandated that Webber and Michigan not associate with one another for 10 years after the Ed Martin booster scandal. Webber has always been reluctant to participate in anything Michigan or Fab Five related. When the famous Fab Five documentary was made a few years ago, Webber was the only member of the quintet not to participate in the making of the film. Jalen Rose, Juwan Howard, Jimmy King and Ray Jackson all have a solid relationship with the University of Michigan at this point.

Webber later criticized the film during an appearance on the Dan Patrick Show, as King and Rose fired back with responses to reignite the feud. In the past, Rose has also been vocal in his belief that Webber should apologize for what happened at Michigan, as the group is hoping to move forward.

Although Webber still isn’t mending fences with the other Fab Five members, or the basketball program, returning to Michigan in some kind of official capacity is a big deal considering his past with the school.

Harbaugh and Webber haven’t decided on a game for next season yet as that will be something to watch for over the next several months.

Akoy Agau returning to Louisville as graduate transfer

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Louisville received a boost to its frontcourt rotation on Friday as former big man Akoy Agau will return to the Cardinals as a graduate transfer.

The 6-foot-8 Agau originally committed and enrolled at Louisville for a season and a half to begin his college hoops career before transferring to Georgetown. After leaving the Hoyas to play at SMU last season, Agau received a sixth year of eligibility from the NCAA after battling injury for much of his career.

Agau gives Louisville an experienced forward who should earn some solid minutes next season. With the Mustangs during the 2017-18 season, Agau averaged 5.0 points and 3.6 rebounds per game in 16.1 minutes per contest.

While this isn’t the biggest splash for the Cardinals, they have plenty of scholarships to use for next season as new head coach Chris Mack tries to find a stable rotation. Getting a graduate transfer like Agau, who should be familiar with the school and the conference at the very least, is a nice step for a one-year placeholder.

NCAA President Mark Emmert got a $500,000 raise in 2016

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NCAA president Mark Emmert, the man in charge of a non-profit association that doesn’t have enough money to pay its laborers, received a $500,000 raise for the 2016 calendar year, bringing his total income to more than $2.4 million, according to an NCAA tax return that was obtained by USA Today.

That number actually pales in comparison to the salaries that are received by the commissioners of the Power 5 conferences.

But there’s not enough money to pay the players.

Nope.

Everyone is broke.

Carry on with your day, and pray for the well-being of NCAA administrators like Mark Emmert, whose salary is in no way whatsoever inflated by amateurism, which allows the schools and the NCAA to bank all of the advertising revenue that college basketball and football brings in and bars the players themselves from accessing that money.

Who will follow Donte DiVincenzo’s breakout path to the NBA next?

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It was little surprise Thursday night Donte DiVincenzo get drafted 17th overall at the NBA draft by the MIlwaukee Bucks.

The 6-foot-5 guard has been a staple of mock drafts since he declared for the draft after earning Most Outstanding Player honors as Villanova won its second national championship in three years.

A few months ago, though, something like that would have seemed an extreme long shot after an unremarkable freshman season by the Delaware product who redshirted after a foot injury in 2015-16. A lot can change in a single season.

So who is the next player to go from fringe prospect to first-round selection? Here’s the DiVincenzo Watch List:

JORDAN POOLE, Michigan: You might remember the Michigan freshman for his game-winner against Houston to help the Wolverines on their way to the national title game, but the former top-100 recruit averaged just 12.2 minutes per game for John Beilein last year. This season, he’s in line for a lot more PT and a chance to shine for more than one moment.

NICKEIL ALEXANDER-WALKER, Virginia Tech: The 6-foot-5 guard can really fill it up, but battled mightily with inconsistency last season. There were nights he’d go for 15-plus and follow it up with a succession of single-digit performances. His offensive game – his ability to make plays and quarterback pick-and-roll – will make him an intriguing NBA prospect. Being able to do it night-in and night-out could make him a first-rounder.

JARRETT CULVER, Texas Tech: Zhaire Smith got all the NBA attention last year while Keenan Evans got the attention of Big 12 defenses, but Culver is a bona fide prospect in his own right. The Red Raiders will be his team next season, and if he shoots it a little better (converted at 38.2 percent from 3 as a freshman), it’s not inconceivable it’s his last in Lubbock.

O’SHAE BRISSETT, Syracuse: The 6-foot-8 forward quietly had a very productive freshman season, averaging  14.9 points and 8.8 rebounds per game for the Orange. He needs to be more efficient, but if he can start making shots with more regularity (he’s plenty comfortable shooting from the outside), he’ll rocket up draft boards.

AMIR COFFEY, Minnesota: Coffey looked like a blue chip recruit before an ACL tear in high school set him back, and shoulder surgery cut a promising sophomore season short. If he can get past the injuries, Coffey is an intriguing wing prospect at 6-foot-8 with plus-athleticism. His shooting has improved since getting on campus with the Gophers and if that trend continues, NBA teams will take serious notice.

ALEX O’CONNELL, Duke: A top-75 recruit in 2017, O’Connell got limited run last year for the Blue Devils, but shot 48.9 percent on 45 attempts from 3-point range. He should move up the pecking order this season for Duke and could be an impact player off the bench.

LINDELL WIGGINTON, Iowa State: The Cyclones’ leading scorer flirted with going pro after a freshman season in which he averaged 16.7 points and shot 40.1 percent from 3-point range before ultimately returning to Ames. The 6-foot-3 guard is one of the most explosive leapers in college basketball, but needs to improve his decision-making and ballhandling. If he makes even moderate gains in those areas, his physical tools and ability to score the ball could have Adam Silver announcing his name next June.

JALEN MCDANIELS, San Diego State: The 6-foot-10 forward averaged  10.5 points and 7.5 rebounds as a freshman and waited until the final hours before the deadline before announcing his decision to return to the Aztecs. He’s got a ton of upside but some concerns are a meager block rate (2.5 percent) and non-existent game at the arc (4 of 18 from 3 last year). Both of those are issues for big men in the modern NBA. He needs to improve one or both of those areas while continuing to be an above-average rebounder to explode onto the draft scene next summer.