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Dawn Staley says South Carolina hasn’t been invited to President Trump’s White House

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Every women’s college basketball champion since 1983 has been invited to visit the White House and meet with the President, according to the USA Today.

Except for South Carolina and head coach Dawn Staley this year.

Speaking with the Associated Press on Friday night, Staley said that her champion Gamecocks have yet to receive an invitation from President Donald Trump’s White House despite numerous other athletic teams recently being involved in the visitation process. The past five Presidents have invited women’s college basketball champions to the White House in an event that has become a standard yearly procedure.

While President Trump famously rescinded an invitation to Steph Curry and the Golden State Warriors on Twitter last week, the Stanley Cup-champion Pittsburgh Penguins were also invited to the White House by Trump. The Chicago Cubs and New England Patriots have also visited with President Trump since he took office.

Both the Warriors and Penguins won titles at least a month after South Carolina’s win over Mississippi State in April.

Men’s college basketball national champion North Carolina tried to make “eight or nine dates” work to visit President Trump at the White House, according to a team spokesman last week. Clemson’s football title team has also visited with President Trump since winning the national title, so the President’s staff has also been aggressive about getting college teams to visit.

Except for the South Carolina women’s team.

“We haven’t gotten an invitation yet and that in itself speaks volumes,” Staley said to the Associated Press. “We won before those other teams won their championships. I don’t know what else has to happen.”

When South Carolina won its national championship, Staley said she would be open to visiting President Trump at the White House.

After the way some things have happened during President Trump’s tenure in office, Staley isn’t so sure the team would visit now if they were invited. Staley told the AP that those comments about visiting the White House came before, “some things transpired over the last few months. I haven’t talked to anyone about it. I got bigger fish to fry than worry about an invitation.”

Staley also serves as the current head coach of the USA women’s basketball team after she won three gold medals as a player with USA Basketball in the Olympics.  During the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Staley was selected to be the flagbearer for the United States during the opening ceremony — considered a tremendous honor for an American athlete.

Gonzaga’s Zach Collins ‘walks the walk’ into one-and-done discussion after Final Four performance

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GLENDALE, Ariz. — This season’s freshman class is arguably the best crop of newcomers that college basketball has seen in over a decade. Between the overall depth and one-and-done star power of the group, it was a class that was discussed at length throughout the season.

Until the Final Four started.

As mock-draft darlings like Jayson Tatum, Lonzo Ball and Malik Monk started to disappear from March Madness, the focus on freshmen and the NBA Draft began to fade. One of the common storylines of the Final Four even revolved around the lack of one-and-done freshmen playing in Glendale.

Gonzaga freshman big man Zach Collins and his outstanding play on Saturday showed that we shouldn’t be finished talking about this season’s newcomers.

Coming off the bench and giving a huge lift on both ends of the floor, Collins finished with 14 points, 13 rebounds and six blocks as he helped the Bulldogs to a 77-73 win over South Carolina during Saturday’s first national semifinal.

Picking up his first double-double of the season, Collins had an extreme amount of confidence entering Saturday’s game despite a poor recent stretch during the NCAA tournament. Collins even predicted to roommate and point guard Nigel Williams-Goss that he was about to erupt on the sport’s biggest stage.

“Well, me and Zach are roommates. And we’ve been roommates all year long,” Williams-Goss said. “And he told me before the game, he said, ‘Look, I wouldn’t want to be playing against me today.’ And Coach says it all year that we just can’t talk the talk, we gotta walk the walk. And when he told me that I looked at him and I said, ‘Alright, let’s do it then.’ For him to come out with a double-double with six blocks, he walked the walk.”

“It feels really good. I know I had a rough couple of games prior to this. I was hearing from everyone on social media about how I wasn’t ready for this stage and how the speed of the game was too much for me. That made me really mad,” Collins said. “I knew I could play at this level. I just wanted to come out, don’t be passive. Be as aggressive as possible with everything I could.”

As starting center Przemek Karnowski went back to the locker room with an eye injury in the first half, Collins and his aggression became a major force on both ends of the floor for the Zags. Owning the glass, finishing around the basket and walling up to block dunks, Collins made all of the plays that should put him squarely in the one-and-done discussion. Collins even willed an ugly three-pointer from the top of the key to go down during a key stretch that helped stop a big South Carolina run.

“That three was huge,” Gonzaga assistant coach Tommy Lloyd said. “It was a 13-0 or 16-0 run. The wheels feel like they’re coming off. It’s one of those shots, he missed it so bad, it went in. You get a sticky ball sometimes. It sticks and rolls in. It was huge for us.”

“It completely bricked. It was probably the ugliest shot I’ve ever taken,” Collins said. “Luckily it bounced in. I’ve never seen a shot like that but I’m happy with it.”

Collins might have been lucky to make that shot, but there is nothing lucky about his intense approach to the game or the results that came during Saturday’s win. Gonzaga’s first McDonald’s All-American to come out of high school, Collins was a bit of a late-bloomer during his high school career.

Collins actually came off the bench during his junior year of high school at Nevada powerhouse Bishop Gorman as two senior McDonald’s All-Americans, Stephen Zimmerman (UNLV) and Chase Jeter (Duke), played in front of him. Gonzaga still recruited Collins as hard as possible despite his limited minutes during the high school season as they saw a guy who could develop.

“We didn’t know he was a one-and-done,” Lloyd said. “We thought this is a great program player for us who is a high-character kid who really wanted to develop in our system.”

“We didn’t recruit him because he was a McDonald’s All-American. We recruited him because he fit Gonzaga’s culture. We’re never going to veer from that path.”

While Gonzaga has been able to sustain consistent success by recruiting at a strong level, they’ve recently started to recruit at an elite level. Collins and Williams-Goss were both Burger Boys coming out of high school. That distinction is important because only two national champions in the last 40 years (Maryland in 2002 and UConn in 2014) didn’t have a McDonald’s All-American on the roster.

Now stocked with elite talent and an impressive rotation, the Bulldogs have all of the pieces they need to compete for a national championship on Monday night.

“Things just kind of fell together for us. You get Przemek to come back for a year with this team and he can play with Nigel. Zach Collins, who isn’t a backup, a lot of times he’s a pickup. He really picks us up and he can really play in these high-level games with his athleticism. And I think it’s honestly been the formula for the team that we are,” Lloyd said.

Regardless of Monday’s national-championship outcome, Collins is going to have an intriguing decision ahead of him in the next few weeks thanks to Saturday’s standout performance. There is already a “Collins” sitting in the first round of a lot of NBA mock drafts, but that would be standout Wake Forest sophomore center John Collins.

After Saturday’s game, adding another Collins to those mock drafts doesn’t sound like a bad idea.

“It’s really cool to see him get the success in this day and age when people aren’t patient,” Lloyd said. “I don’t know what the future holds for Zach. But I know if he stays the course and stays patient, he’ll have unlimited opportunities.”

Confident Final Four newcomers Gonzaga and South Carolina focused on limiting distractions

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GLENDALE, Ariz. — After a few days in Arizona, the new car smell of the Final Four still hasn’t worn off for first-time participants Gonzaga and South Carolina.

Both programs are managing the insane pressure of trying to bring home a national championship while the Bulldogs and Gamecocks also try to encompass the magical experience of everything the Final Four festivities have to offer.

The banquets, dinners, media sessions and overall hype surrounding the Final Four dwarfs anything that these players and coaches have ever dealt with. Wide-eyed players and coaches are still figuring out strange Final Four challenges like the shooting backdrop in the cavernous University of Phoenix Stadium or handling all of the random outside distractions.

It can be a daunting task to juggle everything around the Final Four. Gonzaga and South Carolina are managing the best they can. In a Final Four that features three programs who have never been this far in the modern era, at least one of those teams — the Bulldogs or Gamecocks — will be playing for a national championship on Monday night.

“A lot of people that you haven’t talked to in years try to give you advice on what’s going on like they’ve been through it before,” Gonzaga freshman center Zach Collins said. “I mean, we all expected that. I think we’re all really, really good about keeping together in this locker room, focusing on the task at hand.”

Mark Few’s 18-year tenure at Gonzaga has seen the Bulldogs achieve an incredible amount of success considering the program’s West Coast Conference roots. Despite being a perennial NCAA tournament team who has reached the second weekend multiple times, preparing for the Final Four for the first time has involved new challenges for Few and his staff.

The Gonzaga staff spent the week calling other coaches about Final Four preparation while also relying on the guidance of assistant coach Donny Daniels — an assistant on Final Four teams at UCLA and Utah. The varying degrees of answers from other coaches has helped Gonzaga navigate the week.

Gonzaga players were asked to handle everything outside of basketball before Tuesday so that they could focus fully on Saturday’s game but they’re also trying to relish this experience at the same time.

“That’s the thing about athletics: everything is so regimented. Film is at this time and it’s this long. Practice is at this time and it’s this long. We eat breakfast at this time. And for 36 games, essentially everything has been the exact same,” Gonzaga assistant coach Brian Michaelson said. “Then you get here and your schedule really is chopped up. You get five minutes for film here, five minutes for film there. You may have one scheduled [film session] and it may not end up happening. That’s been different for us. But so far the guys have responded to it pretty well.”

Gonzaga’s current roster and coaching staff has far more NCAA tournament experience than South Carolina, but the last few weeks for the Gamecocks have prepared them for everything that is currently happening to them at the Final Four.

Playing the first two rounds in nearby Greenville meant that South Carolina already had to deal with exaggerated off-the-court hype before the 2017 NCAA tournament even tipped. Gamecock fans were just clamoring for the team to earn its first NCAA tournament win since 1973. Things accelerated quickly for South Carolina and its fanbase after they knocked off Duke and advanced to Madison Square Garden for two more wins.

So while the Final Four still has some new wrinkles that the Gamecocks are adjusting to, they’ve already had to deal with a circus-like atmosphere just to reach Glendale. Most of South Carolina’s strategy to limit distractions has to do with making sure that head coach Frank Martin and his staff can handle everything possible to keep the players focused. Players for the Gamecocks maintain that everything has stayed pretty consistent throughout the season as they treat Gonzaga just like every other opponent.

“Honestly, it’s been pretty easy for us. We’re so focused on the game that we have tomorrow,” guard P.J. Dozier said of the week. “I hate to say that everything else doesn’t matter. But we know what we came here to do. We came here to win a national championship and we’re just trying to take it one game at a time.”

Right now, it seems easy for Gonzaga and South Carolina to limit distractions and stay focused for the national semifinals. Historic Final Four runs have a way of instilling confidence in teams that haven’t been there before.

But things also have a tendency to change very quickly once the ball gets tipped. Mistakes are magnified and the pressure of the Final Four can ramp up very quickly.

Gonzaga and South Carolina are both new to this, but one of them is about to play for a title on Monday. And the previous lack of Final Four experience will ultimately mean nothing.

“Experience helps you manage your mindset, your emotions, as you prepare for something. But when the game goes up, everyone’s nervous,” Martin said. “I don’t care how many Final Fours you’ve played in, every time you show up for that game you’re going to be nervous. And anyone who says differently is not telling you the truth. I don’t care how many games you’ve coached. You’re always nervous for the next game on the schedule. It just, it is what it is.”

VIDEO: Did South Carolina get away with a blatant travel after risky full-court pass?

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South Carolina is heading to its first Final Four in school history after a 77-70 win over No. 4 seed Florida in the East Region on Sunday.

But the No. 7 seed Gamecocks’ historic win also came with some late controversy.

With South Carolina clinging to a 70-68 lead with 53.7 seconds left, the Gamecocks opted to make an extremely risky full-court pass on an inbounds play. The pass was caught at the other end of the floor by South Carolina’s Duane Notice.

Then Notice took about four or five steps before he was fouled by Florida’s Chris Chiozza to send him to the line.

It looks like Notice had a pretty blatant travel on the play. It’s a ridiculous catch in traffic that has to make South Carolina football fans proud, but Notice is clearly walking after getting the ball. Notice knocked down two free throws after Chiozza’s foul to make it a two-possession game as it became 72-68 with 50 seconds left.

Florida was obviously flat in the second half and didn’t deserve to win on Sunday. But it makes you wonder what might have happened if a travel was called on Notice. The Gators would have had a chance to tie with under a minute left instead of it being a two-possession game.

Seton Hall upsets unbeaten No. 16 South Carolina

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Seton Hall overcame some rough stretches of offense and closed out strong as the Pirates upset previously unbeaten No. 16 South Carolina for a 67-64 win at Madison Square Garden on Monday night.

Despite only shooting 34 percent from the field, Seton Hall gutted out a win over one of the best defensive teams in the country.

Attacking the offensive glass hard for 18 rebounds, Seton Hall was able to stay in the game thanks to second-chance opportunities and a defense that kept working despite the sluggish offense. Khadeen Carrington paced the Seton Hall offense with 21 points while Desi Rodriguez added 16 points and Angel Delgado contributed a double-double of 13 points and 12 rebounds.

Rodriguez made the go-ahead bucket with 11 seconds left as South Carolina sophomore P.J. Dozier missed what would have been a potential game-winning three-pointer at the other end.

South Carolina (8-1) once again excelled on the defensive end, as their ball pressure did a number on Seton Hall early. But the Gamecock big men were in foul trouble on Monday and it ended up hurting them immensely on the glass. Chris Silva (11 points) fouled out while Maik Kotsar had some foul issues of his own. And South Carolina couldn’t get much consistent offensive help for Dozier, as he finished with 20 points. The suspension of Sindarius Thornwell clearly made a difference on the South Carolina offense, but they also played pretty well without their leading scorer and had plenty of opportunities to win this game.

This win is very important for Seton Hall’s postseason aspirations since it’s a neutral-court win over a quality opponent. Up until this point, Kevin Willard’s ballclub had wins over Cal and Iowa but both of those teams aren’t nearly as strong as South Carolina. The Big East is going to have plenty of opportunities for more big wins with Villanova, Creighton and Xavier all off to good starts and if Seton Hall can earn some more quality wins, they should find themselves back in the NCAA tournament.

South Carolina lands Class of 2017 guard

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South Carolina pulled in a top-150 commitment on Monday as three-star guard David Beatty committed to the Gamecocks.

Regarded as the No. 135 overall prospect by Rivals.com in the Class of 2017, the 6-foot-2 Beatty is the first guard in South Carolina’s four-man class as he joins three-star forward Ibrahim Doumbia and three-star centers Jason Cudd and Felipe Haase.

A native of Philadelphia, Beatty is a tough and rugged combo guard who should fit well in Frank Martin’s system. Beatty will likely have a chance to join the South Carolina guard rotation early in his career.

The Gamecocks pulling in another top-150 commitment is a good sign for the SEC, as the conference is enjoying a very good fall of recruiting in the Class of 2017.