Zena Edosomwan

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Zena Edosomwan jumps over 6-foot-10 teammate

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Harvard’s Zena Edosomwan, one of returning starters from last year’s Ivy League champion, made his teammates storm the court on Friday night at Crimson Madness.

The junior forward, wearing a Michael Jordan jersey, jumped over 6-foot-10 Balsa Dragovic and two young fans for a one-handed dunk. Edosomwan followed the slam by breaking out a celebratory nae-nae before being swarmed by his teammates.

This just happened at Crimson Madness! Zena Edosomwan over the 6'10" Balsa Dragovic #GoCrimson

A video posted by Andy Towne (@sportstowne) on

Edosomwan averaged 4.0 points and 3.2 boards per game in 2014-15.

Harvard’s first half offensive struggles tie unwanted NCAA record

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Sunday afternoon’s game between Harvard and No. 6 Virginia was set to be a defensive-battle. After one half of play, it was clear that was one-sided, as the Cavaliers led the Crimson 39-8 at half.

Virginia went on to win 76-27.

Harvard was 1-of-20 from the field as a team, compared to Mike Tobey, who was a perfect 6-for-6 from the field, outscoring the Crimson with 15 points — scoring nine points before the first media timeout. The one made field goal — courtesy of Zena Edosomwan at 16:31 — ties an NCAA record with Northern Illinois for fewest field goals in a half.

While Harvard’s first half woes tie the record for fewest field goals, Northern Illinois still holds the title for fewest points and lowest shooting percentage. The Huskies were 1-of-31 (3 percent) for four first-half points against Eastern Michigan in what turned out to be 42-25 win back on Jan. 26, 2013.

Saturday afternoon was actually the second time this season the Cavaliers limited a team to just eight first half points. Virginia held Rutgers to a single-digit second half in a 45-26 win to claim the Barclays Classic title in Brooklyn less than a month ago.

This weekend has shown the result of defensive prowess mixed with offensive futility. On Saturday, top-ranked Kentucky jumped to a 24-0 lead over UCLA, forcing the Bruins to miss their first 17 shots and opening up a 41-7 halftime lead.

That Northern Illinois team from 2013 went on to finish 5-25. UCLA and Harvard were both ranked to begin the season, and are expected to be back in the NCAA tournament field this March.

Unprecedented success hasn’t changed the roots of Harvard’s program

Siyani Chambers (AP Photo)
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Siyani Chambers (AP Photo)

Beginning on October 3rd and running up until November 14th, the first day of the season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2014-2015 NBCSports.com college hoops preview package.

Today, we will be previewing the Ivy League.

MORE: 2014-2015 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule

The job that Tommy Amaker has done turning Harvard into a nationally relevant — and now, nationally ranked — program is criminally underrated, and the proof can be found simply by putting together a list of the best rebuilding jobs in college coaching.

Because you won’t find the Crimson on that list.

In order for something to be rebuilt there has to be a foundation, something to build on, and prior to Amaker’s arrival in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the Crimson weren’t just irrelevant from a national perspective, they were non-existent in the Ivy League’s power structure. When he took the job in the spring of 2007, Harvard had never won 20 games in a season. They were the only member of the conference to have never won a title in men’s basketball, and of the 34 teams that Harvard has on their campus, men’s basketball was the only one that had never brought home an Ivy League championship. Their most recent NCAA tournament trip? 1946, a full decade before the first season of Ivy League basketball.

Things are different these days.

Harvard has won at least 20 games in each of the last five years, reaching the postseason each season. The last three years, the Crimson have won the Ivy’s regular season title and advanced to the NCAA tournament, where they pulled off upsets in 2013 (No. 3 seed New Mexico) and 2014 (No. 5 seed Cincinnati).

RELATED: NBCSports.com’s Ivy League Preview

With yet another crop of high-major recruits joining the fray this year, it shouldn’t be much of a surprise that we have Harvard ranked No. 23 in the country in our preseason top 25. There’s even an argument to be made that the Crimson are the best mid-major program in the country right now.

Hear me out.

Gonzaga can no longer be called mid-major despite the fact that they play in the WCC. It’s been that way for years. Wichita State plays in the Missouri Valley, but with the money they have invested in Gregg Marshall’s program and the success they’ve had in recent seasons, it’s fair to wonder if they still qualify as a “mid-major.” Butler and Creighton are in the Big East now. VCU and Davidson will be league foes in the Atlantic 10 this season.

Who’s better? Maybe Belmont? Stephen F. Austin? Wofford? Ohio? Maybe, but the argument isn’t the point. The simple fact that Harvard is very much in that discussion is, and I was curious: did Amaker actually think that was possible at Harvard?

So I asked him.

“Yes, to be very honest,” he said this week in a phone interview with NBCSports.com, and it makes sense. Remember, this is a guy that played and coached at Duke. He reached the Sweet 16 in 2000 and then reeled in an excellent recruiting class that included Eddie Griffin, Andre Barrett and Marcus Toney-El at Seton Hall. He coached at Michigan for six seasons. You don’t get those jobs without having a little bit of confidence in yourself.

And that confidence was easy to see on the recruiting trail, at least in the eyes of Siyani Chambers. Chambers, a junior guard, is one of the best players in the Ivy League. He’s been Harvard’s starting point guard since the day he set foot on campus, picking the Crimson over a handful of high-major programs.

“I was not aware of it,” Chambers said of Harvard’s lack of basketball pedigree in an interview with NBCSports.com this week. “I was just aware of what Coach Amaker was telling me and the future that he saw for us and how I could contribute to the rise of the program.

“When I was looking to come here my senior year in high school, I saw a program on the rise after their first trip to the NCAA tournament and Coach Amaker said, ‘This is what we’re trying to continue to do. So if we work hard and continue to bring in good recruiting classes, this is how we’re supposed to be for a long time.’ I bought into it. So did everyone else that’s come through here.”

And that, more than anything, is the most impressive part of the job that Amaker has done with the Crimson. Not only has he proven that it’s possible to win there, but he’s managed to convince everyone — the school, the coaching staff, the players he recruits — that this is the way it should have been all along.

It hasn’t hurt that he’s been able to bring in a roster full of recruits that had the chance to play at a higher level, but according to Amaker, the key to Harvard’s success has been that the talent in the program has bought into, as he puts it, “our goals, our identity and our standards.”

Case in point: Zena Edsomwan.

Edsomwan was the 82nd-ranked recruit in the Class of 2013, picking Harvard despite holding offers from programs such as Arizona State, USC, California and Colorado. As a freshman, minutes were difficult to come by for Edsomwan despite the fact that he was quite productive when he did get on the court. There were only four games last season where Edsomwan played more than 11 minutes, and in those games he averaged 11.5 points and 4.8 boards per contest. But he didn’t leave the program this offseason. He’s still on the roster, waiting for his opportunity. It’s not hard to see that patience as an example of the faith Amaker’s players have in him.

“We believe in the system that coach puts in front of us,” Chambers said. “We believe that we should be able to win and compete with anyone that plays us.”

It’s Chambers, says Amaker, that helps set that example. It’s why the junior has been named a co-captain on a senior-laden team.

“He knows nothing other than winning,” Amaker said. “His spirit, his presence, his work ethic, he’s ultra-competitive. If any of those aspects change or get pushed to the back, that’s what drives his engine. It’s not so much whether the shot goes in or whether he’s driving to the basket or not, all of that is secondary because of his presence, his way of being. He’s a natural-born leader, and he’s been that way since day one when he’s been with this program.”

Through two years, Chambers and Harvard have been a match made in heaven. But success does breed expectation, however, and at some point, people are going to start wondering when Harvard will have their program-defining tournament run. Winning in the regular season is great. Pulling off opening round upsets are awesome. But, eventually, the question will be asked: will Amaker ever get Harvard out of the NCAA tournament’s first weekend?

“That never crossed my mind,” Amaker said. “I guess, in a lot of ways, if that’s the case, that’s an amazing compliment.”

Top 25 Countdown: No. 23 Harvard Crimson

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Siyani Chambers and Tommy Amaker (AP Photo)

Beginning on October 3rd and running up until November 14th, the first day of the season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2014-2015 NBCSports.com college hoops preview package. We continue our countdown today with No. 23 Harvard.

MORE: 2014-2015 Season Preview Coverage | NBCSports Preseason Top 25 | Preview Schedule

Last Season: 27-5, 13-1 Ivy (1st), lost in the Round of 32 to Michigan State

Head Coach: Tommy Amaker

Key Losses: Kyle Casey (9.7 ppg, 5.6 rpg), Brandyn Curry (9.4 ppg, 3.0 rpg, 2.8 apg), Laurent Rivard (9.9 ppg, 43.0% 3PT)

Newcomers: Andre Chatfield, Chris Egi, Zach Yosher

Projected Lineup

G: Siyani Chambers, Jr.
G: Corbin Miller, So.
F: Wesley Saunders, Sr.
F: Kenyatta Smith, Sr.
F: Steve Moundou-Missi, Sr.
Bench: Jonah Travis, Sr.; Zena Edosomwan, So.; Evan Cummins, Jr.; Andre Chatfield, Fr.; Chris Egi, Fr.

They’ll be good because … : They’ve been good enough to advance to the Round of 32 the last two seasons — they upset No. 3 New Mexico in the 2013 NCAA tournament and No. 5 seed Cincinnati last season — and they not only return two players that could legitimately be named Preseason Ivy League Player of the Year, they also have a front line that is as big, deep and talented as any high-major program that they’ll run into.

It all starts with Siyani Chambers (11.1 ppg, 4.6 apg) for the Crimson. The 6-foot lefty is not only a natural born leader and floor general, he’s talented — and confident — enough to take and make big shots. He’ll be joined on the perimeter by Wesley Saunders (14.2 ppg, 4.6 rpg, 3.8 apg), a 6-foot-5 wing that has been the team’s leading scorer the past two seasons. Those two make up one of the best 1-2 punches in the country, not just at the mid-major level.

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Wesley Saunders (AP Photo)

While Chambers and Saunders are Harvard’s star power, their front line is good enough to compete with anyone in the country. Steve Moundou-Missi, the best rebounder on the team, is back for his senior season while Kenyatta Smith, who averaged 2.1 blocks as a sophomore in just 14.5 minutes, should be healthy after playing just two games last season. Senior Jonah Travis is back as well, while sophomore Zena Edosomwan and freshman Chris Egi are both top 150 recruits that will play a role off the bench. How many mid-major programs can claim that?

But they might disappoint because … : There simply is not depth in Harvard’s back court this season. Chambers and Saunders, who would be a bit of a liability playing off-guard, will once again be asked to provide heavy minutes. Both averaged 33 minutes in league play last season, and there will be no Laurent Rivard or Brandyn Curry to lean on this season.

Curry was the team’s backup point guard last season, but he was a fifth-year senior that had started prior to a year-long suspension in what was Chambers’ freshman season. Rivard was another senior guard, a sharp-shooter that helped space the floor. To replace those two this season Harvard will be counting on sophomore Corbin Miller and freshman Andre Chatfield.

Miller, like Rivard is a sniper from beyond the arc. He shot 45.6% from three and averaged 4.7 points as a freshman in limited minutes … but that was in 2011-2012. He’s spent the past two seasons on a Mormon mission. Chatfield is a freshman off-guard that was a three-star recruit with high major offers, but he put together a disappointing senior season and ended the year unranked in HoopSeen.com’s top 30 prospects in Georgia.

Outlook: There’s a lot to love about this Harvard team. They have a veteran point guard that has been through some battles and led his team to a pair of league titles — which is impressive in a tougher-than-you-realize Ivy League — and wins back-to-back NCAA tournaments. They have a big-time scorer on the wing and a myriad of big bodies up front. Tommy Amaker has proven that he can win with this group and that shouldn’t change this season.

But unlike last year, the Crimson won’t be able to survive injuries to their back court this season. One high-ankle sprain to Chambers in league play and all of a sudden the Crimson are in danger of missing the NCAA tournament; the Ivy League doesn’t have a conference tournament.

Assuming that Chambers stays healthy, the key to Harvard’s season will be whether Miller and Chatfield can return to their previous form. If Miller can be a double-digit scorer that shoots 43.0% from three, like Rivard, and if Chatfield can be the guy that was recruited by ACC and SEC schools, Amaker will once again have a team that will be a threat to make the Sweet 16.

Integrating Kyle Casey and Brandyn Curry back into Harvard’s program

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All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here.

After winning the Ivy League title outright in the 2011-12 season and earning their first bid to the NCAA Tournament since 1946, Harvard was poised to repeat as Ivy champs the following season, and perhaps even win their first game in the tournament. Those hopes appeared to be dashed in September of 2012 when it was announced Harvard would be without Kyle Casey and Brandyn Curry due to an academic scandal.

Think again. Thanks in large part to the emergence of Wesley Saunders and Siyani Chambers, an immediate impact player at point guard, Harvard won the Ivy League and shocked No. 3 seed New Mexico in the NCAA Tournament to the tune of a 68-62 victory. Saunders and Chambers effectively slid in and took over the roles previously held by Casey and Curry. What ensued was a solid 20-10 overall record, an Ivy League championship, and the school’s first NCAA Tournament victory. Not to mention, it was Harvard head coach Tommy Amaker’s first win in the tournament since his days at Seton Hall.

Compound Harvard’s success last year with the fact that only one player, Christian Webster, was claimed by graduation and the return of Casey and Curry, along with incoming freshman Zena Edosomwan, and the Crimson are a legit Top 25 team.

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(MORE: Click here to read NBCSports.com’s Ivy League Preview)

On paper, Harvard certainly is Top 25 quality. Entering the season, the biggest question mark isn’t who will be the “go to” scorer, the defensive stopper, the spot-up shooter, or low post presence — the Crimson have seemingly all their bases covered from a personnel standpoint. The question is: How will Casey and Curry, who have been absent for a year, fit back in with the team?

Tommy Amaker isn’t the least bit concerned. He told NBCSports.com by phone: “I don’t foresee any issues with Kyle and Brandyn meshing in. They’re kids who want to win, and they’ve made that incredibly clear throughout their time here at Harvard. I think they recognize how important it is to fit in. It’s just not these two guys, it’s how we all approach it. It’s a different year — every year’s different even if you have the same players. These guys have recognized that good things occurred in their absence, and they’re here to help the team push the ball up the hill. ”

At the time, it was unclear what the immediate future would look like for Casey and Curry. To go from being the faces of the program to outsiders, so to speak, was difficult. Amaker never felt that the two would seek to transfer and take their last year of eligibility elsewhere. “We never had any concerns whatsoever with them returning. Those kids and their families came here to go to Harvard. To have an opportunity to graduate from here, they weren’t walking away from that.”

(CLICK HERE to read through the rest of NBCSports.com’s feature stories)

For the 2011-12 season, Casey and Curry were fixtures in the starting lineup, to go along with Keith Wright, Laurent Rivard, and Oliver McNally. The duo combined to average 19.3 ppg, 7.5 rpg, and 5.7 apg with Casey being the team’s leading scorer.

Initially, it was difficult to find the silver lining in having two of his top players and co-captains away from the program for a season, but Amaker explained that it forced other players to mature and elevate their games at a faster pace. The adage “next one in” is one that is often used in football when a player is hurt in the midst of a game and the second string guy has to come in off the bench. Wesley Saunders was that “next one in” for Harvard.

“We went on a tour of Italy last summer as a team and those guys [Kyle Casey and Brandyn Curry] were there, but our best player for the whole foreign tour was Wesley Saunders. We anticipated that this young man was in store for something pretty darn special, and with or without various individuals, we saw that.”

With the emergence of Saunders, who went from seeing just 13.9 mpg and averaging 3.3 points as a freshman to 37.3 mpg and 16.2 points — the tops in the conference — and Siyani Chambers taking over at point guard, Harvard still had the pieces to be successful. However, losing both co-captains with the season set to begin in just months certainly made for an ominous feeling within the program.

Amaker recognized this and communicated it to his team prior to the season’s beginning: “We may not have what we had, but we have enough.”

His words held true. Harvard did, indeed, have enough as they won the Ivy League championship and advanced to the Round of 32 in the NCAA Tournament.

With Casey and Curry back in the fold, there is no telling how far Harvard can advance this season. There has been a lot of buzz surrounding the program during the offseason, and talks of advancing even further in the NCAA Tournament have already begun. Amaker was quick to point out how he and his team deal with high expectations: “We’re very much a believer that expectations is an external word. We focus on our standards, which is an internal word. The three components that are important to us are standards, identity, and goals. If we give our best effort in these three categories, we are very much at peace with who we are.”

If success in these categories translates to another run in the NCAA Tournament come March — an even deeper one this time — Tommy Amaker and Harvard basketball will certainly be at peace.

2013-14 Ivy League Preview: The year of the Crimson

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All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of the Conference Previews we’ve published, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

Expectations have never been higher for an Ivy League team heading into a season. On the heels of upsetting New Mexico in the 2013 NCAA Tournament, having Kyle Casey and Brandyn Curry rejoin the program, and welcoming the highly-touted recruit Zena Edosomwan to the team, Harvard is the clear-cut favorite to win the Ivy League. Not to mention, the Crimson also return first team all-Ivy players Wesley Saunders and Siyani Chambers, and sharpshooter Laurent Rivard. It is a supremely talented roster that Tommy Amaker, now in his seventh year, has constructed.

It’s hard to see another team seriously challenging the Crimson, but if there is a challenge it will come in the form of the southernmost school in the league, Pennsylvania. After experiencing a great deal of success in 2011-12, registering 20 wins and an 11-3 league record, the Quakers regressed last year, going just 9-22. Miles Jackson-Cartwright and Tony Hicks make for a dynamite backcourt, along with freshman guard Matt Howard – who received offers from BCS schools – who will provide meaningful minutes, as well.

Harvard’s biggest rival, Yale, also figures to be a factor. James Jones, the longest tenured coach in the Ivy League, had the Bulldogs playing their best basketball of the year in the final ten games going 7-3 down the stretch. Plus, they return many of their primary pieces save for guard Austin Morgan.

One of the more intriguing teams in the league who appear to be on the upswing with Mike Martin now at the helm is Brown. Last year’s Defensive Player of the Year, Cedric Kuakumensah, is back for his sophomore season, but losing Tucker Halpern is a big blow for the Bears.

Of course, it would be foolish to think Princeton won’t be in the mix. Despite losing last year’s Player of the Year Ian Hummer, Denton Koon and T.J. Bray return for Mitch Henderson.

PRESEASON IVY LEAGUE PLAYER OF THE YEAR: Wesley Saunders, Harvard

Saunders (16.2 ppg, 4.2 rpg, 3.5 apg, 1.8 spg) made a tremendous jump from his freshman to sophomore season – he had to with Casey and Curry’s absence – and will continue to be a focal point on offense for the Crimson.

FOUR MORE NAMES TO KNOW

  • G Siyani Chambers, Harvard: The best point guard in the league on the best team in the league.
  • G Tony Hicks, Pennsylvania: May lead the league in scoring as a sophomore after averaging 15.3 ppg in league games last season.
  • F Shonn Miller, Cornell: Nobody fills up a box score quite like Miller who averaged nearly two steals and blocks last year.
  • F Cedric Kuakumensah, Brown: A menace on the defensive end who will only improve offensively.

ONE TWITTER FEED TO FOLLOW: @ivybball

PREDICTED FINISH

1. Harvard
2. Pennsylvania
3. Yale
4. Brown
5. Princeton
6. Columbia
7. Cornell
8. Dartmouth