Zach Auguste

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Notre Dame big man Zach Auguste ruled eligible

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Notre Dame junior big man Zach Auguste and the team received good news on Saturday as the school announced that he would play on Saturday against Miami. The 6-foot-10 big man was under academic suspension from the school earlier this week and missed Notre Dame’s win at Georgia Tech.

But he’s back and will play on Saturday:

This is really encouraging news for the Irish, since Auguste was blossoming during certain stretches of play this season. He was great in the second half against North Carolina and has clearly been Notre Dame’s most important interior player since they don’t have much size.

With Auguste back, Notre Dame is a really tough out at home and will be a major contender in the ACC. The junior is second on the team in points and rebounds per game at 14.3 points and 6.4 rebounds per contest. He’s also shooting 65 percent from the field.

Mike Brey calls Zach Auguste’s suspension ‘academic matter’, return ‘out of my hands’

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On Wednesday morning, news leaked out of South Bend that starting center Zach Auguste did not make the trip to Georgia Tech with the Irish.

He wasn’t kicked off the team, it was just an academic issue that he has to get cleared up. And while Notre Dame head coach did comment on Auguste after the Irish beat the Yellow Jackets on Wednesday night in Atlanta, he didn’t provide much clarity for the situation.

“It’s an academic matter,” Brey told reporters the win. “He’s handling it. That’s all I’m going to say about it.”

“I don’t have enough info on it yet,” he added. “I’ll have a little more info on it (Thursday). … It’s out of my hands.”

This is the third time in a little more than a year that Brey has had a player in trouble because of his grades. Jerian Grant, who is having an all-american caliber season this year, was suspended from school for the second semester of the 2013-2014 season. He was essentially kicked off campus, but he returned to school in June. Demetrius Jackson was suspended for two games and missed a week of practice in February of his his freshman season because he had fallen behind with his classwork.

The good news for the Irish?

Auguste’s infraction does not appear to be an honor code violation, which is what kept Grant on campus and which got quarterback Everett Golson suspended two seasons ago.

On Wednesday in Atlanta, Notre Dame started freshman Martinas Geben in Auguste’s place, but Geben was pushed around by Georgia Tech’s big front line. Brey settled on using Austin Torres and Bonzie Colson as the center in a — very small — 2-3 zone, and it worked, but it was a quick fix. Notre Dame already struggles defensively, they cannot afford to play the rest of the season without their best interior presence.

Notre Dame’s next three games are Miami at home followed by Virginia Tech and N.C. State on the road. On Jan. 28th, they host Duke.

Notre Dame’s starting center to miss Georgia Tech game, possibly more

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Zach Auguste is in the midst of a breakout junior season for the Fighting Irish, but that appears ready to come to a screeching halt.

ESPN.com is reporting that Auguste will be held out of action due to academics and that his status is still undetermined. But according to a report from FOX28, Auguste has been suspended for the remainder of the season, which would be the second straight year in which Mike Brey has lost a key piece in his rotation midway through the season. Jerian Grant saw his 2013-2014 season come to a close at the end of the first semester.

When reached by NBCSports.com, a Notre Dame spokesperson simply said that Brey will “address the situation” after Wednesday’s game.

Auguste is averaging 14.3 points and 6.4 boards on the season, playing a pivotal role as a low-post scorer and, more importantly, as the screener in Notre Dame’s pick-and-roll heavy offense.

The top 15 most improved players in college basketball

Ty Wallace (AP Photo)
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Ty Wallace (AP Photo)

 MORE: The rest of our New Year’s Resolutions | Midseason catchups

Ty Wallace, Cal: I’m firmly entrenched on the Ty Wallace bandwagon, having said repeatedly that there is no player in the country as underrated as Cal’s star point guard. Look at this stat line: 19.3 points, 8.8 boards, 4.2 assists and 46.9 percent shooting from three.

Justin Anderson, Virginia: Anderson’s emergence into Virginia’s leading scorer has been the biggest surprise of the season for me. Always known as a great athlete and teammate, Anderson is now averaging 15.1 points and shooting 60.0 percent from three. He’s not a go-to guy, but he’s been Tony Bennett’s most valuable weapon thus far.

Willie Cauley-Stein, Kentucky: Cauley-Stein is starting to live up to his potential this season, becoming the nation’s most versatile defender while anchoring on college basketball’s best defense. A 7-foot-1 center, he can switch ball-screens and has been tasked with stopping an opponent’s best wing scorer at times this season.

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Robert Upshaw, Washington: Washington’s emergence as a top three team in the Pac-12 can almost entirely be credited to Upshaw, who has become the nation’s premiere shot-blocking presence. He’s averaging 4.6 blocks in just 20 minutes and has completely changed the way that Washington is able to defend. I’d argue he’s one of the ten most valuable players in the country right now.

Christian Wood, UNLV: Wood is playing like a first round draft pick, averaging 13.9 points, 9.6 boards and 3.0 blocks for the Rebels. He had 24 points and 10 boards in UNLV’s win over No. 3 Arizona on Tuesday night.

Terry Rozier, Louisville: Rozier has done much of what was expected of him this season. His scoring is up to 16.5 points from 7.0 as a freshman, and while he’s not shooting quite as well from the perimeter this season, his percentages are up overhaul and he’s turned into one of the nation’s best, and most important, secondary options.

Rakeem Christmas, Syracuse: Someone had to become a scorer for Syracuse this season, and thus far in the year it’s been the senior big man that’s done it. He’s averaging 16.5 points and 8.7 boards, a bright spot in an otherwise frustrating season for the Orange.

Zach Auguste, Notre Dame: Auguste has always had the potential to be a big-time scorer in the paint for the Irish, and he’s finally reaching it this year. Auguste’s averaging 14.8 points through the first month, although it will be interesting to see what happens when the Irish start to play some tougher competition.

Levi Randolph, Alabama: Randolph has become a go-to guy for Alabama as a senior, as he’s now posting some impressive numbers: 16.5 points, 4.9 boards and 3.1 assists for the 8-3 Tide.

Dylan Ennis, Villanova: Who saw this coming from Ennis? He’s Villanova’s leading scorer, their most dangerous three-point shooter and one of the best defenders on the roster.

Stefan Nastic, Stanford: With so much of Stanford’s front line graduating, Nastic’s role has been dramatically increased this year, and it’s paying off. Nastic is averaging 14.5 points and has become one of the better low-post scorers on the west coast.

Justin Moss, Buffalo: As a sophomore, Moss averaged 3.8 points and 3.2 boards playing behind Javon McCrea. As a junior, those numbers have bumped up to 17.3 points and 10.2 boards. Oh, and he did this.

Malcolm Hill, Illinois: Hill started a handful of games as a freshman, but as a sophomore he’s moved into a major role for John Groce. His scoring has bumped up to 12.8 points this year, as the Illini look like they could contend for a spot in the NCAA tournament.

Damian Jones, Vanderbilt: Jones has developed into the star we expected him to be as a sophomore, averaging 16.5 points and 7.1 boards.

Denzel Valentine, Michigan State: The Spartans have been a disappointment through the season’s first month, but Valentine has been terrific. These numbers are nothing to joke about: 14.5 points, 5.5 boards, 4.3 assists, 50.0 percent from three.

New Year’s Resolutions: Notre Dame Fighting Irish

Mike Brey
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Over the course of the holiday week, we at College Basketball Talk will be detailing what we believe will be the New Year’s Resolutions of some of the nation’s most talented, most disappointing, and thoroughly enigmatic teams. What can we say, we’re in a giving mood.

Who else made Resolutions? Click here to find out.

WHAT DOES NOTRE DAME PROMISE TO DO MORE OF?: Expand their rotation.

  • Why it will happen: Mike Brey doesn’t really have a choice but to expand his rotation and give more minutes to Zach Auguste, Tom Knight, and Austin Burgett. With news breaking after Notre Dame’s game against Ohio State at Madison Square Garden that star guard Jerian Grant would no longer be with the program due to an academic issue, Brey has been put in a tough position. The Irish’s bench only accounts for 21.1% of the overall minutes to begin with, and taking Grant’s 35.6 mpg out of the picture makes matters worse. Brey no longer has the option to play with a small line-up like he favored. Auguste or Knight now will most likely move into the starting five.
  • Why it won’t happen: Unless Mike Brey tries to play basically his starting five with just one off the bench, this will happen. I still think Notre Dame has a chance to be decent in the ACC, but they are in a world of trouble as things currently stand. There were already flaws with this team; compound that with taking Grant out of the equation, and things look bleak. The onus falls on Zach Auguste and Tom Knight to really log quality minutes in the front-court — they have both been hot and cold this season.

WHAT DOES NOTRE DAME SWEAR THEY WILL DO LESS OF?: Settling for outside shots.

  • Why it will happen: With Grant no longer playing, Notre Dame will revert back to playing a more traditional three guard, two forward line-up, rather than going small with four guards and a forward. As such, expect Notre Dame to go inside more often and continue featuring Garrick Sherman, along with Auguste / Knight. For a team that shoots collectively 76% from the line, they should be attempting more than 21.5 FT per game. Eric Atkins and Pat Connaughton have both taken more three-pointers than free throws. While they are both proficient from the perimeter, they cannot continue to settle for that shot.
  • Why it won’t happen: The last time Notre Dame got to the line at a high rate was during the 2010-11 season. That year, they boasted a front-court consisting of the dual-threat Tim Abromaitis, Tyrone Nash, and Scott Martin — Nash shot free throws at one of the highest rates in the country. The problem: Notre Dame simply doesn’t boast forwards of this caliber on this year’s team. It’s unrealistic to expect Atkins and Connaughton to all of a sudden become different players. Grant has shot the most free throws — far and away — this season. In his absence, it’s hard to see who will get to the charity stripe regularly.

The X-Factors of the 2013-2014 College Basketball Season

Keith Appling
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All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of our preview lists,click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

Duke’s big men: With Jabari Parker, Rodney Hood and Rasheed Sulaimon on the roster, Duke’s perimeter attack is so loaded that it will be tough to find minutes for guys like Matt Jones, Andre Dawkins and Alex Murphy. The issue for the Blue Devils will be in the paint. With Mason Plumlee having graduated, the Blue Devils will have a couple of options: using redshirt freshman Marshall Plumlee, consistently out-talented Josh Hairston or playing an undersized youngster like Amile Jefferson or Semi Ojeleye out of position. The Blue Devils will be able to spread the floor and create matchup problems, but will they defend the rim and rebound the ball?

Keith Appling, Michigan State: It seems like Appling has been the x-factor for the Spartans for the better part of a decade, and this season is no different. Appling has never been a pure point guard, and it’s taken him time to learn to be a playmaker first and foremost. It will be all the more essential this season, as the Spartans plan to play in transition more often this season. There’s enough talent on this roster to win a national title if Appling can lead them there.

Aaron Gordon’s position: If Aaron Gordon can embrace the idea of playing the four, than he has a chance to be a first-team All-American and Arizona should be considered a legitimate title contender. But if he forces his way into being a wing, it creates problems for the Wildcats. I wrote about this extensively here, so I’ll keep this section brief.

Yogi Ferrell, Indiana: There are so many question marks about the Indiana program heading into this season, but if there is anything that we do know about the Hoosiers, it’s that Ferrell will be the guy running the point. The only guy running the point, as a matter of fact. Indiana doesn’t really have a back-up. He’ll also be asked to be Tom Crean’s go-to guy offensively as well, which is a lot of pressure to put on one player. If he can handle it, Indiana should end up near the top of the Big Ten.

Chris Jones, Louisville: I’m not sure that people truly understand just how valuable Peyton Siva was to Louisville last season. He was the guy with the ball in his hands at the end of a clock, he was their leader and play maker, and he was a perfect fit for what Rick Pitino wanted defensively. More importantly, Siva was a calming influence alongside Russdiculous. Those are mighty big shoes for Jones, a one-time Tennessee commit and the best JuCo player in the country a year ago, to fill.

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Tyler Ennis, Syracuse: Ennis is really the only point guard on the Syracuse roster, which means that Jim Boeheim will be turning over the reigns of his team to a player that has never set foot on a collegiate court before the season. The Orange are once again talented enough to be considered a top ten team and a title contender heading into the season, but if this group is to make a return to the Final Four, they’ll need Ennis to have a big freshman year.

Michael Cobbins, Oklahoma State: Travis Ford will have more guards at his disposal than he will know what to do with next season. In addition to all-league performers Marcus Smart and Markel Brown, the Pokes have Phil Forte, Brian Williams and Stevie Clark on the roster. Throw in Le’Bryan Nash, and Oklahoma State has the pieces to be able to spread the floor quite effectively. To make that happen, however, Ford will need to find a presence in the paint, and Cobbins, a 6-foot-8 redshirt junior that averaged 6.9 points and 6.1 boards a year ago, is the guy that will be called upon.

Joel Embiid, Kansas: You know about Andrew Wiggins and how good he should end up being. You’ve probably heard about Wayne Selden and Perry Ellis and how they can compliment Wiggins offensively. But with a team as young as Kansas is with as many question marks as the Jayhawks have at the point guard spot, consistency on the offensive end will be hard to come by. As always, Kansas will be a team that wins because they are elite defensively, and Embiid, like Jeff Withey was the past two seasons, will be the anchor of that defense.

Derrick Walton, Michigan: Replacing Trey Burke is not going to be an easy thing for Michigan to do, as it was his ability to come off of screens and create that made the Wolverines so dangerous. That’s why Nik Stauskas and Glenn Robinson III got so many open threes throughout the year, and that’s part of the reason that Mitch McGary blew up in the postseason. Burke made everyone that much better with his ability to create. Walton, and to a lesser extent Spike Albrecht, is the hear apparent to the point guard spot at Michigan. No pressure, he just have to replace the National Player of the Year.

Zach Auguste, Notre Dame: The Irish have a terrific perimeter attack this season, but losing Jack Cooley is going to hurt. He was a double-double machine that got Mike Brey’s club so many second-chance points. Tom Knight and Garrick Sherman are known quantities, big bodies that will play hard, use their five fouls and reward you with a couple of buckets and a couple boards. Auguste is more talented than that. He’s good enough to be a real replacement for Cooley, and a real post presence on this team is a difference-maker.

Josh Smith, Georgetown: If Josh Smith can get into shape, he’s an all-american caliber talent. His size, his quick feet, his touch around the rim. He could really be effective for the Hoyas considering how good some of their guards are. The problem? Not only has Smith never been in shape in his career, but he’s still waiting for word from the NCAA when he can suit up this season. If he joins the team in December, will he be as effective?

source:
AP

Here are 12 more X-Factors:

  • Shaq Goodwin and David Pellom, Memphis: The Tigers are loaded on the perimeter, but they’ll need Goodwin and Pellom to be a presence in the paint to compete for the AAC title.
  • Kenny Chery, Baylor: The JuCo transfer will have first crack at replacing Pierre Jackson at the point.
  • Kris Dunn, Providence: Finally healthy, Dunn is a dynamic point guard that should thrive in Ed Cooley’s uptempo system.
  • Cullen Neal and Deshawn Delaney, New Mexico: Replacing Tony Snell’s defense and perimeter shooting will be the key to New Mexico’s season.
  • Dorian Finney-Smith, Florida: With Will Yeguete banged up and Chris Walker ineligible for at least the fall, the versatile Finney-Smith will see plenty of minutes.
  • Xavier Johnson, Colorado: Johnson was awesome in flashes last season and will fill the role Andre Roberson left vacant.
  • Robert Hubbs, Tennessee: The Vols need someone to help Jordan McRae keep the floor spread for their big men.
  • Tony Parker, UCLA: If reports are true and Parker has gotten into shape this offseason, he could be the paint presence Steve Alford needs.
  • Deandre Kane, Iowa State: Kane put up huge numbers at Marshall but wasn’t the easiest player to deal with in the locker room.
  • Deandre Daniels, UConn: With more guards than Kevin Ollie can handle, Daniels will need to help Tyler Olander up front.
  • Alex Dragicevich, Boston College: Can the Notre Dame transfer help take the pressure off of Ryan Anderson and Olivier Hanlon?
  • Jarrod Uthoff, Iowa: We will finally get to see the Wisconsin transfer in action after two straight redshirt seasons.