UIC Flames


VIDEO: UIC’s Gabe Snider hits seated half-court shot

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One of the major trends of this college basketball offseason has been players attempting trick half-court shots that they get on tape.

While many players have opted to go with the blind, throw-it-over-your-head half-court shot, UIC senior guard Gabe Snyder decided to try a seated half-court shot.

Since Snyder also made the shot away from center court and more towards the sidelines, it makes it an even tougher shot.

UIC to hire Indiana assistant Steve McClain as head coach

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An Indiana basketball coach will leave Bloomington for a new head coaching job.

Steve McClain, the IU associate head¬†coach, will be announced as UIC’s next head coach, sources confirm to NBCSports.com Jeff Goodman of¬†ESPN¬†was the first to report the news on Saturday morning.

McClain will replace Moore, who was 49-111 in five seasons with the Flames. The university and Moore parted ways on March 15. Former Oregon State head coach Craig Robinson was also interviewed for the UIC opening.

McClain, who has been on Tom Crean’s coaching staff for five years, has previous head coaching experience at Wyoming, where he compiled a¬†157-115 record in nine seasons.

Two UIC players suspended three games apiece for violation of school policy

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After winning just six games in 2013-14, Howard Moore’s UIC Flames are hoping to turn things around this season. Unfortunately for UIC, two players won’t be with them to start the campaign as they’ve been suspended three games apiece.

Fifth-year senior guard Jay Harris and redshirt freshman guard/forward Lance Whitaker have been suspended for a violation of team rules, with the program announcing the news Thursday afternoon. Harris, a native of nearby Aurora, Illinois, averaged 10.3 points, 2.8 rebounds and 2.8 assists per game at Wagner last season.

Harris played in 21 games, starting 17, before being suspended for the remainder of the season for a violation of school policy.

As for Whitaker, he’s returning to the court after playing in just three games in 2013-14 due to a torn ACL in his right knee. As a result of the injury Whitaker was granted a medical redshirt. UIC returns two starters from last season’s team, and both Harris and Whitaker are expected to contribute this season.

‚ÄúBeing a member of the UIC men‚Äôs basketball program is a privilege and with that comes a certain level of expectations and responsibility,‚Ä̬†Moore said in the release announcing the suspensions.

2014-15 Season Preview: Can Green Bay take the next step, represent the Horizon League in the Tournament?

Keifer Sykes (AP Photo)
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source: AP
Keifer Sykes (AP Photo)

Beginning on October 3rd and running up until November 14th, the first day of the season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2014-2015 NBCSports.com college hoops preview package.

Today, we are rolling out our Horizon League preview.

MORE: 2014-2015 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule

The Horizon League drew most of its attention from the college basketball general public in 2013-14 for regular-season champion Green Bay’s early exit from the league’s conference tournament. Considered by many to be the heavy favorite to make the 2014 NCAA Tournament after a 14-2 regular season mark in the conference, the Phoenix ultimately fell short in the semifinals as some analysts used the Green Bay loss — and subsequent NIT appearance — as an opportunity to blast the conference tournament method¬†of NCAA Tournament selection.

While Green Bay was one of the better mid-major teams in the country during the regular season last year, they fell to Milwaukee at home in the tournament. But with four returning starters, the Phoenix are favored to win the league this season.

Even with the departure of senior center Alec Brown, who was selected in the second round of the NBA Draft by the Phoenix Suns, head coach Brian Wardle still returns Horizon League Player of the Year favorite in senior point guard Keifer Sykes as well as¬†forward Jordan Fouse,who might be the league’s best defensive player. Green Bay will miss the skill level of Brown on the interior, but they might actually have more interior depth this season as 6-foot-9 senior and double-figure scorer Greg Mays returns and Wardle recruited a few big bodies to bolster the rotation of big men that he can use.

Challenging Green Bay this season will Cleveland State, who has multiple all-league candidates, including senior point guard Charlie Lee, junior big man Anton Grady and junior guard Trey Lewis. Senior forward Marlin Mason acts as a stretch four and 6-foot-9 redshirt sophomore Aaron Scales can play this season and gives the Vikings another big body on the interior.

The most intriguing team in the Horizon League this year could be Valparaiso, who returns 6-foot-10 rim protector Vashill Fernandez along with three talented sophomores — point guard Lexus Williams, forward Alec Peters and forward Jubril Adekoya — and Charlotte transfer E. Victor Nickerson. Bryce Drew’s ballclub went a surpring 9-7 in the league last season despite starting Adekoya, Peters and Williams as true freshmen.

Billy Donlon loses five of the top six scorers from a Wright State team that fell short in the conference tournament finals a season ago, but the Raiders return 5-foot-9 senior point guard Reggie Arceneaux along with 6-foot-6 sophomore J.T. Yoho and guard Crishawn Hopkins. Wright State had 10 players average double-figure minutes last season, so expect Donlon to go to his seven-man recruiting class early and often for depth.

Defending conference tournament champion Milwaukee will not represent the Horizon League again in the NCAA Tournament. This isn’t a bold prediction, but a truth, as the Panthers are ineligible for postseason for low APR scores. But three starters still return for Milwaukee, led by senior point guard Steve McWhorter and junior big man Matt Tiby and Northern Illinois transfer Akeem Springs should add some scoring punch on the wing.

Detroit has the pieces to surprise in the Horizon this season as senior wing Juwan Howard Jr., returns after a breakout junior season. If the son of the former Fab Five member can get some help from Colorado transfer Chris Jenkins or 6-foot-8 sophomore Paris Bass, the Titans could compete sooner than later. Bass, in particular, will be one to watch after sitting out last season.

Oakland now faces life in the post Travis Bader-era, as the NCAA’s all-time leader in three-pointers has graduated and moved on. The Golden Grizzlies will now have to rely on the inside-outside combination of senior big man Corey Petros and returning Horizon League Freshman of the Year Kahlil Fielder at point guard. St. John’s transfer Max Hooper, who shot 40 percent from three-point range in his final season in New York, will get a shot at replacing the prolific Bader.


One of the most dynamic point guards in the country, the 5-foot-11 senior puts up numbers all over the floor and usually rises to the occasion when Green Bay has a big game. A freak athlete with outstanding leaping ability and quickness, Sykes is a difference-maker on both ends of the floor and averaged¬†20.3 points, 4.9 assists and 4.4 rebounds per game in his junior season. The only thing missing on the¬†resume for the senior is a trip to the NCAA Tournament and he’s focused on leading four returning starters to the Big Dance in 2014-15.


  • Juwan Howard Jr., Detroit –¬†The son of former NBA veteran and Fab Five member Juwan Howard, the 6-foot-5 senior had a breakout junior season, averaging 18.3 points, 5.5 rebounds and also leading the Titans in assists.
  • Corey Petros, Oakland –¬†A 6-foot-10, 260-pound senior, Petros is a load to handle on the interior and averaged 13.3 points and 8.2 rebounds per game last season on 57 percent field goal shooting.
  • Alec Peters, Valparaiso¬†–¬†The 6-foot-9 sophomore had a huge impact as a freshman, averaging 12.7 points and 4.8 rebounds per game on some impressive shooting splits for a player his size (49% FG, 77% FT, 38% 3PT).
  • Trey Lewis, Cleveland State¬†–¬†The Vikings have multiple all-league candidates but Lewis averaged 13.6 points per game as a sophomore and if the 6-foot-3 guard improves his shooting percentages, that number could climb greatly.



1. Green Bay
2. Cleveland State
3. Valparaiso
4. Wright State
5. Milwaukee
6. Detroit
7. Oakland
8. Youngstown State
9. UIC

UIC announces addition of Wagner graduate transfer Jay Harris

Wagner Athletics
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With leading scorer Kelsey Barlow out of eligibility, Howard Moore’s UIC Flames are in need of added scoring punch on the heels of their 6-25 (1-15 Horizon League) 2013-14 campaign. The hope in Chicago is that guard Jay Harris will be able to help the Flames in this area, with the school announcing Thursday that the former Wagner guard has joined the program.

As a graduate transfer Harris, who averaged 10.3 points, 2.8 rebounds and 2.8 assists in 21 games last season, will be eligible to play immediately.

‚ÄúJay will add tremendous experience to our program,‚ÄĚ Moore said in the release. ‚ÄúHe has played and excelled in several high-pressure games throughout his career and he will serve as a great resource to our underclassmen and newcomers. He‚Äôs a fantastic shooter and the ultimate competitor.‚ÄĚ

Harris joins senior guard Marc Brown on the perimeter, with Brown averaging 11.3 points per game in 2013-14.

Harris was suspended for the remainder of the 2013-14 season in mid-February due to a violation of school policy, and UIC will be his third Division I school. Harris played his first two seasons of college basketball at Valparaiso, where he averaged 9.1 points per game as a sophomore.

Four-time defending Canadian champion Carleton will play Indiana and Memphis this August

Carleton University Ravens' Hinz holds the trophy after defeating the Lakehead Thunderwolves during the Canadian Interuniversity Sport championship game in Ottawa
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The Carleton Ravens play north of College Basketball Talk‘s normal coverage area, but the Canadian basketball powerhouse is worth talking about. Simply put, Carleton is making a John Wooden-at-UCLA type of run right now in the CIS.

The Ravens have won four consecutive CIS titles and have been champions for 10 of the last 12 seasons. They’re an astounding 292-14 since the year 2000.

Carleton might be beating up on overmatched competition in the CIS, but they’re better than a lot of Division I basketball programs. Want proof? Last summer, Carleton beat eventual Final Four team Wisconsin and led former 2013-14 No. 1 team Syracuse by 15 in the second half before losing in overtime.

Carleton also had a respectable road loss to NCAA Tournament team Cincinnati in exhibition play last fall and the Ravens also beat TCU and Towson at home last summer. Going 3-2 against that kind of Division I schedule as a Canadian team is no joke. These guys can really play.

So that brings us to this summer. Carleton is once again hosting four Division I schools for exhibition matchups in August. Every four years, the NCAA allows Division I basketball programs to take a foreign trip for exhibition games and using that trip to play a team as good as Carleton will only help gauge how a team might look for the 2014-15 season.

The Ravens will begin their home exhibition schedule with a game against Indiana on August 11th. Carleton then hosts Vermont on August 12th and UIC on August 14th.

Memphis comes in for two games against Carleton on August 16th and August 19th and it seems like Tigers head coach Josh Pastner has a lot of respect for the Ravens and their basketball program.

In a release from Memphis about their Canadian exhibition tour Pastner commented on the strong competition the Tigers will face. Memphis will also face McGill University and the University of Ottawa on the trip.

“The most important thing about putting this trip together was finding great competition, and this tour has it,” Pastner said in the release. “The teams we’ll see on the tour took Louisville, Syracuse and Wisconsin down to the wire last summer, and the Cardinals, Orange and Badgers were three of the best teams in college basketball this past season. We’ll face teams that run really good stuff, and if we don’t play well, we can get beat. But, it will be good for us to face that level of competition this summer.”

As you can see, Pastner really respects Carleton and I’m sure the coaching staffs at Indiana, UIC and Vermont feel the same way about going to Canada to face the four-time defending champs.

Of all of the foreign exhibition games that happen this summer, these contests at Carleton will probably be some of the best games played. Don’t be surprised if the Ravens come out with a winning record in the five games against Division I compeition.