Tubby Smith

Baylor forward Rico Gathers, far left, and Baylor guard Lester Medford, center left, struggle with Texas Tech center Norense Odiase for possession in the first period during an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016, in Lubbock, Texas. (Mark Rogers/Lubbock Avalanche-Journal via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
(Mark Rogers/Lubbock Avalanche-Journal via AP)

Texas Tech loses starting big man Odiase for up to 6 weeks

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Texas Tech took a huge blow to its interior depth this week as head coach Tubby Smith confirmed on his radio show that starting big man Norense Odiase is expected to miss the next six weeks with a broken bone in his foot.

The 6-foot-9 Odiase broke his¬†fourth metatarsal in a win over TCU this week and he is expected to spend the next three weeks in a cast before being reevaluated. Starting in all 17 games for the Red Raiders this season, Odiase averaged 9 points and 4.4 rebounds per contest in 19.5 minutes per game. Although he doesn’t put up huge numbers, Odiase has been a steady interior presence for a Texas Tech team that doesn’t have much depth up front.

Without Odiase in the lineup, head coach Tubby Smith will likely rely on reserves like junior forward Matt Temple or other options that have seen more regular rotation minutes like sophomore forward Zach Smith and junior forward Aaron Ross.

Texas Tech sits at 12-5 and is hoping for some upsets in Big 12 play to spring an NCAA tournament bid, this is not a good sign of the Red Raiders making that postseason run happen.

Minority coaches push for NCAA to adopt a Rooney Rule

John Thompson III
Associated Press
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A group representing minority coaches is pushing the NCAA to adopt a rule that would require member institutions to interview a candidate of color for all head coaching and leadership vacancies.

The National Association for Coaching Equity and Development is joining longtime equality crusader Richard Lapchick in lobbying for an “Eddie Robinson Rule,” which would be college athletics’ version of the NFL’s Rooney Rule.

The group says such a rule would “address the negligent hiring practices which consistently exclude racial and ethnic minority coaches and administrators from positions of leadership in intercollegiate athletics.”

“It’s not about supply anymore,” Merritt Norvell, NAFCED’s executive director, said Friday. “There are plenty of qualified racial and ethnic minority coaches. It’s about the hiring process, which has historically and systematically excluded minority coaches by denying them an opportunity to compete in the process.”

NAFCED was formed last year to combat the dwindling numbers of minority coaches in college sports after the once powerful Black Coaches Association faded. Prominent members include Texas Tech basketball coach Tubby Smith, Georgetown basketball coach John Thompson III and Texas coach Shaka Smart.

Lapchick’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida released an annual study before the college football season that reported 87.5 percent of the 128 head football coaches in the NCAA’s Bowl Subdivision were white. That includes all four teams that made it to the playoff – Alabama, Clemson, Oklahoma and Michigan State.

Further, nearly 80 percent of college presidents and athletic directors at FBS schools are white males.

Lapchick has long advocated that the NCAA adopt a rule similar to the NFL, and he named it after Robinson, the revered coach at Grambling State who died in 2007. He called the endorsement from NAFCED “an enormous boost” that he hopes will help the proposal gain traction.

“I think what has been lacking is a forceful group of prominent sports leaders backing this,” Lapchick said. “This is such a group. In the absence of the BCA, this organization has the potential to have an impact on their own campuses as well as the NCAA.”

Norvell said NAFCED leaders plan to meet with NCAA leadership and conference commissioners in coming months.

“I do think for the health of the game we need diversity on the sideline,” former Georgia Tech and George Mason coach Paul Hewitt said. “It’s vitally important. We’re going through a very critical stage here and we need a lot of different ideas, a lot of different thoughts, a lot of different perspectives so we can arrive at the best place for the game and the kids who play the game.”

The biggest question will be whether the NCAA, or any other governing body, can enforce the rules on such a wide swath of public and private institutions. In 2009, Oregon passed a law that requires all of its public universities to interview minority candidates for coaching positions, but the law does not penalize schools that do not follow the rules.

Norvell said NAFCED, which is partnering with the National Consortium for Academics and Sports and The No Hate Zone in pushing for an Eddie Robinson Rule, said the public pressure that could be generated from such a measure would help schools adhere to the rule. Lapchick said he thinks legislative action would be more compelling than any perceived punishment that the NCAA could hand out.

“Having Congress rattling the sword as a result of this announcement by NAFCED would be an additional vehicle that would make the possibility of the NCAA moving more likely,” Lapchick said. “But I think this is the first step. Bringing Congress in to act would be a positive second step.”

Power forward becomes Texas Tech’s fourth 2015 commitment

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Texas Tech added another piece to its front court on Thursday, as three-star power forward Shawntrez Davis committed to Tubby Smith’s program according to 247Sports. The 6-foot-8 Davis, who attends Sound Doctrine Christian Academy in LaGrange, Georgia, is the fourth commitment in the Class of 2015 for Texas Tech and he joins a front court that will be young in 2015-16.

Texas Tech’s three other commitments in the class are junior college transfer Devon Thomas and freshman guards C.J. Williamson Jr. and Jordan Jackson. Williams and Davis were teammates on the Game Elite grassroots squad, which also produced California signee Jaylen Brown.

Davis made the decision to attend Texas Tech two weeks after officially visiting the school, and he was also considering Boston College, LSU and Texas according to 247Sports. Davis officially visited Boston College in late April. Texas is currently in the running for power forward Noah Dickerson, who signed with Florida but reopened his recruitment after Billy Donovan moved on to accept the Oklahoma City Thunder’s head coaching offer.

Texas Tech’s interior rotation currently consists of rising sophomores Isaiah Manderson, Zach Smith and Norense Odiase, with redshirt junior Aaron Ross being the lone upperclassman. The addition of Davis gives Texas Tech some more athleticism in the front court, and his ability as a rebounder should come in handy for a team that ranked ninth in the Big 12 in defensive rebounding percentage last season (67.4 percent).