Player of the Year

AP Photo National Player of the Year: Doug McDermott, Creighton

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This was obvious, wasn’t it?

I mean, Dougie McBuckets has only been at the top of our National Player of the Year Power Rankings for months, and we’ve only been calling him a shoe-in for the National Player of the Year award since late-January.

The bottom-line is this: McDermott put up enormous numbers this season (26.5 ppg, 7.2 rpg, 52.2% FG, 44.7% 3PT), capping off a once-in-a-generation career with the most memorable individual performance of the season when he scored a career-high 45 points, including his 3,000th point, on Senior Night in front of a record-setting crowd in Omaha.

RELATED: Coach of the YearFreshman of the Year | NBC All-American team

He’s the centerpiece of the nation’s most explosive offense, the reason that a team one-year removed from the Missouri Valley Conference not only is a legitimate Final Four threat, but that they’re even competing in the Big East to begin with.

McDermott only has a handful of games left at the collegiate level. I hope you all get at least one more chance to watch him play.

College Basketball Player of the Year Power Rankings

AP Photo


1. Doug McDermott, Creighton: What else can be said about McDermott’s season — and his career — at this point? He had 26 points on 11-for-19 shooting in a win at Butler in which he just so happened to hit the game-winning three with 47.8 seconds left. He followed that up by scoring 39 points on 13-for-17 shooting from the floor in another blowout win over No. 6 Villanova. Here’s what Jay Wright had to say about him after the game:

“I think I have a unique perspective in that I was with the USA team last summer when he played with the developmental team against the pros, and he played very well. Sometimes you watch a guy in college and you think about how that’s going to transfer to the NBA. But I saw it, and everything he does here in college he did this summer with those guys. I think he’s as complete a player with size as I’ve ever seen. 6-foot-8, 6-foot-9, there’s nothing he can’t do. He can take you off the dribble, he guards, he’s tough as hell, he defends, he rebounds, he moves without the ball, he seals. He’s the best post player that we’ve played against and he’s the best perimeter player, and he may be one of the best passers. And he’s 6-foot-9. He’s as good of a basketball player as I’ve seen.”

McDermott set a Big East record by earning Player of the Week honors for the seventh time this season. According to Rob Anderson, Creighton’s SID, McDermott has now won Player of the Week or Newcomer of the Week in 27 of the 63 weeks he’s played college basketball.

2. Jabari Parker, Duke: Parker was making up a bit of ground on McDermott before that 39-point outburst, as the freshman’s slump is nothing but a distant memory. We’ve been over this: when Parker is attacking the basket instead of settling for jumpers, he’s as dangerous as any scorer in the country. During this eight-game resurgence, he’s taken 75 free throws and just 21 three-pointers. In the five games before that, his slump, he took 21 threes and just 14 free throws.

Here’s Exhibit A of what I mean: instead of settling for a jumper, Parker went to the rim and managed to land himself the game-winning dunk against Maryland:

3. Shabazz Napier, UConn: Ho-hum, just another 34-point, five-rebound, four-assist performance from Napier in an overtime win over Memphis. He’s been so good this season that numbers like that are hardly even surprising anymore.

4. Tyler Ennis, Syracuse: Luke Winn came up with the nickname “Ennions” for Ennis, a play on Bill Raftery’s favorite saying. Personally, I like Captain Clutch. Syracuse is still undefeated after a pair of last-second wins, and Ennis had a major hand in both of them. He hit the running 35-footer to give the Orange the win at Pitt on Wednesday and had the game-winning assist to C.J. Fair on Saturday to beat N.C. State.

On the season, in final five minutes and overtime of one-possession games, Ennis is now 8-for-10 from the floor and 14-for-14 from the line with seven assists and just a single turnover.

5. Sean Kilpatrick, Cincinnati: Kilpatrick played one game last week, scoring 28 points and handing out six assists in a win over Houston. The Bearcats are built entirely around their defense. Kilpatrick is, for the most part, the only guy on the roster that can score. Let’s put it into context: Cincinnati is 108th in the country in offensive efficiency, while Kilpatrick is third in the nation in offensive efficiency for players that use more than 28% of their team’s possessions. In other words, Kilpatrick is putting up McDermott-esque numbers in an offense that’s no where near as good.

6. Russ Smith, Louisville: Smith has been better this season than he was last season. The problem? Louisville only has two notable wins this season: SMU and at UConn. In their last five games, however, the Cards play at Cincinnati, at Memphis, at SMU and at home against UConn. Big performances in those games will get Smith more attention nationally.

7. Nick Johnson, Arizona: Johnson was terrific earlier this season, but with Brandon Ashley, more offensive responsibility has fallen into Johnson’s lap. In the four games since Ashley went out, Johnson is averaging 11.5 points while shooting 25.0% (15-60) from the floor and 1-for-18 from three, or 5.6%. That’s … not good.

8. Xavier Thames, San Diego State: Thames is in the same boat as Kilpatrick, a talented scorer on a team that doesn’t have many of them. In two games last week, Thames was 6-for-26 from the floor and 2-for-13 from three. SDSU lost at Wyoming and struggled against Air Force.

9. Kyle Anderson, UCLA: The Bruins swept Utah and Colorado this week while Slo-Mo averaged 19.0 points, 8.5 assists and 8.0 boards. He’s averaging 15.4 points, 8.7 boards and 6.8 assists on the season.

10. Jabari Brown, Missouri: Brown needs some love. His numbers this season are ridiculous: 20.5 points, 4.6 boards, 45.7% 3PT, 126.4 oRTG. In SEC play, they get even better: 22.8 points and 50.0% 3PT.

Others: Jordan Adams, Kyle Anderson, Cameron Bairstow, Bryce Cotton, Sam Dekker, Cleanthony Early, Joel Embiid, C.J. Fair, Marcus Foster, Aaron Gordon, Gary Harris, Rodney Hood, Deandre Kane, Kevin Pangos, Lamar Patterson, Adreian Payne, Elfrid Payton, Julius Randle, Marcus Smart, Juwan Staten, Nik Stauskas, Fred Van Vleet, T.J. Warren, Andrew Wiggins, Scottie Wilbekin, Chaz Williams

College Basketball Player of the Year Power Rankings

Doug McDermott
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1. Doug McDermott, Creighton: Since 1997-1998, no college basketball player has averaged 24.5 points, 7.2 boards and shot 43.0% from beyond the arc. In NBA history, no player that has shot more than 15 threes in a season has averaged 24.5 points, 7.0 boards and shot 43.0% from three. Right now, McDermott is averaging 24.3 points and 7.2 boards while shooting 42.98% from beyond the arc, and that’s because he’s been in a “slump” the last three games.

His numbers over that stretch? 19.3 points, 7.3 boards and 40.0% shooting from three. Those are all-american caliber numbers. How many players would love to be mired in that slump?

2. Shabazz Napier, UConn: Outside of a forgettable trip to Texas, Napier has been sensational for an otherwise thoroughly mediocre UConn team. The Huskies have won four of their last five and regained their footing in the AAC thanks to Napier, who is now averaging 17.8 points, 6.0 boards, 5.9 assists and 2.0 steals while shooting 44.3% from long range.

3. Jabari Parker, Duke: Parker’s shooting percentages have dipped, but that was something that was bound to happen. As terrific as he was in the first month and a half of the season, Parker was never really known for having the kind of shooting stroke that Doug McDermott does. You should get used to seeing nights where he shoots 5-for-12 or 7-for-19, which is why I think it’s fair to say he’s busted out of his five-game slump. The most important stat for Parker? Free throws. When he’s shooting free throws, it means he’s attacking the basket instead of settling for jumpers. The last four games he’s taken 34 free throws. The five before that, when he was slumping? All of 14.

source: Getty Images4. Nick Johnson, Arizona: Johnson’s athletic enough that he’ll throw down some impressive dunks from time-to-time, but outside of that, he’s never going to do much that will ‘wow’ fans in the stands or watching on TV. He’s not going to score 30 or control a game offensively or completely change the way a defense plays. But he’s the best player on the best team in the country — their best perimeter shooter, their best slasher, their best defender, their leader, their go-to guy at the end of a clock. Your game doesn’t always have to be ‘loud’ to be great.

5. Nik Stauskas, Michigan: It’s fun to follow the ebbs and flows of the Player of the Year race in college basketball because it tends to highlight the guy that got hot at the right time. Napier was the favorite to win the award back in November, as he posted monstrous numbers and repeatedly made big shots in clutch moments for the Huskies. Then it was Jabari Parker’s turn to take the lead, as his star turn carried us through the holidays. But as the calendar changed, it was Dougie McBuckets who staked his claim to the award and, essentially, put himself in a position where it’s his title to lose over the final month and change of the season.

At this point, Stauskas may be the guy that puts together the run that can spring an upset in the Player of the Year race. Playing without their three best players from last season’s run to the National Title game, Michigan has climbed right back to the top of the Big Ten standings, and Stauskas is the biggest reason why. It’s good news and bad news for the Wolverines. They look like a title contender again, but it means that Stauskas won’t last in Ann Arbor that much longer.

6. Tyler Ennis, Syracuse: I know what Jim Boeheim told Kelli Anderson of about C.J. Fair. I don’t care. Ennis is the most important player on this Syracuse team, and he’s playing at an elite level on both ends of the floor.

7. Marcus Smart, Oklahoma State: Between the flopping, the tantrum against West Virginia and his insistence on trying to be a jump-shooter, Smart has become one of the more frustrating players in the country to watch. There may not be a better all-around player in the country this season. He’s not playing like it right now.

8. Julius Randle, Kentucky: Randle is still the same player he was in November. Here’s the issue: he plays in the SEC, so he’s not landing knockout blows over title contenders on a nightly basis, and he’s the focal point of every defensive game-plan. Want to know why the Harrisons and James Young are starting to have bigger scoring nights? Because Randle gets double- and triple-teamed on every touch.

9. Xavier Thames, San Diego State: I wanted to give Thames some love on this list because I don’t think he is getting enough attention nationally. SDSU’s defense is why they are a top ten team with a win at Kansas under their belt. They’re not a good team on the offensive end, however, which means that: a) everything runs through Thames, and b) his 17.6 points are just that much more impressive. He’s hit as many big shots this year as Shabazz Napier has.

10. Joel Embiid, Kansas: I have to leave Embiid here. He’s turned into arguably the most dominant paint presence in the country.

The next five:

  • Kyle Anderson, UCLA
  • Bryce Cotton, Providence
  • Lamar Patterson, Pitt
  • Casey Prather, Florida
  • Russ Smith, Louisville

Others: Jordan Adams, Keith Appling, Cameron Bairstow, Sam Dekker, C.J. Fair, Aaron Gordon, Gary Harris, Rodney Hood, Deandre Kane, Sean Kilpatrick, Kevin Pangos, Adreian Payne, Elfrid Payton, Jayvaughn Pinkston, Fred Van Vleet, T.J. Warren, Andrew Wiggins, Chaz Williams

College Basketball Talk’s Player of the Year Power Rankings

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The 2013-2014 season is sure to be a thrilling Player of the Year race, so to keep track of it, we will be posting weekly Player of the Year Power Rankings for your reading goodness.

Who’d we miss? Who’s ranked too high? We love to overlook your team’s best player and overrate your rival’s superstar.

1. Doug McDermott, Creighton: McDermott is the National Player of the Year right now. You won’t find much debate from anyone on that subject. And while McDermott is awesome around the basket and deadly when he gets his feet set and a look at the rim, what makes him such a great scorer is how he moves without the ball.

I found a perfect example from Creighton’s win over Xavier. In the first frame, once the ball is swung to Austin Chatman on the wing, McDermott (red circle) has two screens set for him. He cut to the block off of Jahenns Manigat’s back-screen or use Ethan Wragge at the top of the key to try and find space for an open three:


McDermott gets a decent look, but Xavier’s Justin Martin closes out hard:


Instead of forcing a three, he swings the ball to Manigat and sets him a ball-screen, popping to the corner afterwards:


The ball eventually winds up in Wragge’s hands on the other side of the floor, and McDermott makes his favorite cut, curling off a screener at the foul line and running right at the rim:


Here’s the full possession:

2. DeAndre Kane, Iowa State: An ankle injury didn’t slow Kane down against Kansas, as the Cyclone point guard finished with 21 points, eight boards, three assists and four steals. Since Boise State dared him to shoot threes on national TV on Christmas day, Kane is 9-for-19 from three. Two straight losses — at Oklahoma and against Kansas, keep that in mind — sullies this a bit, but Kane’s earned this spot. For now, at least.

3. Jabari Parker, Duke: Parker has struggled in the last five games, averaging just 10.5 points and shooting 32.2% from the floor and 14.3% from three during a 3-2 stretch for the Blue Devils. His numbers on the season are still impressive, but he needs to buck this slump and turn Duke back into an ACC contender.

4. Julius Randle, Kentucky: Kentucky got away from pounding the ball into Randle over the course of the last two games — he finished with a combined 15 points on just 17 shots — but the big fella still did his damage on the backboards, finishing with 25 rebounds in wins over Vanderbilt and Mississippi State.

5. Marcus Smart, Oklahoma State: The battle for Big 12 Player of the Year may end up being more fun to follow than the National Player of the Year award. Kane and Smart both belong at the top of that conversation, while Andrew Wiggins and Joel Embiid will certainly stake their claim to the award before the season’s over. Smart’s turnovers and perimeter shooting are still a concern, but it’s worth noting that without Michael Cobbins in the lineup, Smart’s averaged 10.o rebounds in three games. No guard can dominate the game on both ends of the floor the way that Smart is capable of.

6. Nick Johnson, Arizona: There may not be a player in the country that is as underrated as Nick Johnson. He is the No. 1 team’s leading scorer and best perimeter defender. He’s there best outside shooting threat as well, and in a win against UCLA, he also just so happened to be the guy asked to take big shots down the stretch. There isn’t a better off-guard in the country right now, save for maybe a healthy Gary Harris.

7. Tyler Ennis, Syracuse: We’ve been over and over Ennis’ importance to Syracuse on the offensive end of the floor, but he’s a pretty good defender as well. Ennis is averaging 2.8 steals after snagging six against Boston College on Monday night. Not bad at the top of that Syracuse zone.

8. Keith Appling, Michigan State: Adreian Payne could easily be on this list in this spot, but I’m rolling with Appling. His development as a lead guard — 16.4 points, 4.6 assists, 3.5 boards, 48.3% 3’s — and numerous big shots for the Spartans this season make all the difference.

9. Casey Prather, Florida: Prather’s been injury-plagued during his tenure at Florida, which is why it’s concerning that he’ll miss his second consecutive game today with a bone bruise in his knee. Hopefully he can get healthy. 

10. Shabazz Napier, UConn: Napier’s fallen out of favor in some other Player of the Year rankings, but look at these numbers: 16.4 points, 6.4 boards, 6.0 assists, 2.1 steals, 47.3% 3’s. UConn is not as good as we thought they were a month ago, but they’re a tournament team and Napier’s penchant for late-game heroics is the biggest (only?) reason why. He deserves to be on this list.

Others: Jordan Adams, Kyle Anderson, Cameron Bairstow, Jordan Clarkson, Aaron Craft, Joel Embiid, C.J. Fair, Aaron Gordon, Rodney Hood, Marcus Paige, Lamar Patterson, Adreian Payne, Elfrid Payton, Russ Smith, Fred Van Vleet, T.J. Warren, Andrew Wiggins, Chaz Williams, Joseph Young

CBT Roundtable: Midseason Player of the Year, Coach of the Year, All-Americans

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This week was the first full week on conference play, which means that today’s roundtable is the perfect chance for us to argue our way through midseason awards. Here are the picks:


Player of the Year: I know that he’s struggled in his last couple of games, and I know that there are issues on the defensive side of the ball, but I’m still riding with Jabari Parker as the National Player of the Year. That said, Dougie McBuckets is nipping at his heels. How cool would it be to see McDermott win a National Player of the Year award?

Coach of the Year: Another nip-and-tuck battle between a pair of worthy candidates: as far as I’m concerned, Steve Fisher is the National Coach of the Year, but I think I could be convinced that Fred Hoiberg deserves the award over him. Is there actually a wrong answer here?

First Team All-America: There are four obvious picks, in my opinion:

Deandre Kane, Iowa State
Jabari Parker, Duke
Doug McDermott, Creighton
Julius Randle, Kentucky

The fifth spot? That could go to Shabazz Napier or Marcus Smart or Keith Appling or Tyler Ennis or C.J. Fair. The list goes on and on. I think I would lean Napier at this point.

Tell me why I’m wrong.


Player of the Year: I love Jabari Parker’s game as much as anyone — I covered him for four years as a Chicago Sun-Times preps basketball writer — but to not give this award to Doug McDermott would be a travesty. Doug McDermott isn’t getting benched in losses for defensive lapses and he doesn’t go into shooting slumps. There’s been one game all season in which McDermott scored under 19 points; Parker’s been 12 and under his last three games. It’s a close race, sure, but it isn’t as if McDermott is playing in the MVC this season and he’s averaging a full 4.5 points per game more than Parker right now. Parker is off to a tremendous start — especially for a freshman — but let’s not cloud our judgement of an award because it is cool to see a freshman get it. McDermott deserves it over Parker all day.

Coach of the Year: I’ll go with Villanova’s Jay Wright for this one. There’s obviously a number of worthy candidates — and, as Rob said, there’s probably not a wrong answer — but we had Villanova as the sixth best team in the Big East our preseason picks — and I supported that — and the Wildcats are back to playing really good Jay Wright ball. They’ve beaten Kansas and Iowa on neutral courts and are clearly the class of the Big East at this point in the season.

All-Americans: I’m cool with the first four picks, but for my fifth spot I’ll go with Shabazz Napier. You could make the argument for Gary Harris over Keith Appling, Marcus Smart had an odd stretch where his scoring was limited — somewhat by choice in some cases — and C.J. Fair and Tyler Ennis have both been tremendous for Syracuse, but where would UConn be without Napier?

I’m not just talking the buzzer-beater, but Napier is clearly UConn’s most important player and the Huskies crumble when he doesn’t play well. Appling has played hurt and Michigan State can still win; Smart has had quiet stretches and the Cowboys have won because the sum of their parts; and Ennis and Fair still have Jerami Grant and a great supporting cast. Napier doesn’t have that much support on a nightly basis. UConn would be completely lost without him and that’s why he merits my fifth and final spot.


Player of the Year: Yeah, I’m with the McDermott pick and defense really doesn’t have much to do with it. Neither is the second coming of famed “Jordan stopper” (haha) Gerald Wilkins, so while that end of the floor does matter very rarely does an elite defender win POY unless he’s a player like a Ralph Sampson on Patrick Ewing. That being said, have you guys looked at McDermott’s percentages? 48.4% from the field, 42.9% from three and 90.6% from the foul line. Not to be biased here given our “Chase for 180” series, but that’s pretty doggone good. I like what Parker’s done overall this season, and he’s a clear-cut first team All-American (this current two-game stretch isn’t the norm for him), but for Player of the Year I’ll take McDermott.

Coach of the Year: While I’m certainly big on both Fisher and Hoiberg here’s another name to consider: Jim Boeheim. I know many will go with the “well look how good his team is, no kidding they’re undefeated” retort, but yeah let’s look at his team. Specifically a backcourt that really needed to step up given their heavy personnel losses on the perimeter, and thus far Tyler Ennis and Trevor Cooney have done just that. We all knew Syracuse would be good, maybe with a loss or two by this point in the season. But I’m not in favor of using that against a coach when discussing these honors.

First Team All-America: And for Rob’s fifth guy on his All-America team, might it be necessary to consider UCLA’s Kyle Anderson? He may not score at the rate of the other possibilities, and given the other options that really isn’t his job. But to be averaging 14.5 points, 8.7 rebounds and 6.7 assists per game underlines just how versatile the sophomore playmaker is. And his percentages: 51.6% from the field, 54.5% from three and a respectable (albeit, not elite) 75.4% from the foul line. I wouldn’t be mad with any of the possibilities listed, and would likely lean in favor of Napier given how important he is to UConn, but Kyle’s name should be in the discussion.


Player of the Year: Doug McDermott. Ironic, right? In a season that’s all about freshmen, a senior is going walk away with the player of the year honors. But McDermott’s earned it. And it’s not like this is a shocking pick by any means.

Coach of the Year: There are so many candidates halfway through the season and all of them have really good cases. I’ll go with Bo Ryan of Wisconsin. The Badgers are currently undefeated and are one of the top teams in the nation’s best conference. Is he going to remain undefeated? No. But he’s exceed expectations this so far, and he has done a great job with this group of players. Did you know Wisconsin has won games by scoring 103 points and 48 points?

First Team All-America: Again, lot of candidates with valid arguments, but I see Marcus Smart rounding out the first team. Like Napier he’s so important to his team. He had one of the season’s best single-game performances in a win over Memphis. His numbers were a bit down following the rematch against Memphis, but he bounced back for 24 points and 11 rebounds in the Cowboys last win.


Player of the Year: It’s hard to disagree with McDermott. He is the best offensive player of the country, bar none — no one can score in the variety of ways he can. However, I am going to take the contrarian route, to an extent, and side with DeAndre Kane. It’s clear, based on his play through the non-conference, that he was the most significant transfer over the summer months. Kane is the primary reason Iowa State is undefeated and has surged into the Top 10. A 6-foot-4 point guard who does it all on the floor and stuffs the stat sheet each night to the tune of 16.1 ppg, 7.1 rpg, 6.3 apg, and 1.5 spg. He’s hardly a proficient jump-shooter, but has a knack for getting to the rim in the Cyclones’ high octane offense. More importantly, however, he manages the Iowa State — ranked 10th in efficiency, per — exceptionally well.

Coach of the Year: Wisconsin graduated two of their three leading scorers from a season ago, but Bo Ryan has the Bagers back to where they seemingly always are every year — and then some. What is so impressive about this Wisconsin team is their ability to win in a multitude of ways. Whether it’s grinding a game out and playing at a snail’s pace against Virginia, or throwing up 95 points against Illinois, Ryan has Wisconsin looking as good as the 2007-08 squad that won 31 games. He’s doing all of this with players that are unique to the offensive system he has built, and would not be nearly as effective elsewhere. Truly, one of the best coaches in the business.

First Team All-America: How about Florida’s Casey Prather? Prather was nothing more than a mere role player for his first three seasons at Florida, but has developed into the Gators’ best offensive player as a senior. Florida’s roster has been in flux for much of the season with Scottie Wilbekin, Kasey Hill, and Dorian Finney-Smith all being in and out of the lineup, but Prather has been the one constant. Averaging 17 points, 5.5 rebounds and shooting 62.4% FG, Prather is the primary reason why I am so high on Florida.

College Basketball Talk’s Player of the Year Power Rankings

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source: Getty Images

The 2013-2014 season is sure to be a thrilling Player of the Year race, so to keep track of it, we will be posting weekly Player of the Year Power Rankings for your reading goodness.

Who’d we miss? Who’s ranked too high? We love to overlook your team’s best player and overrate your rival’s superstar.

1. Jabari Parker, Duke: On Saturday, Parker scored seven points on 2-for-10 shooting and got himself benched for the final 3:35 in a loss to Notre Dame in South Bend that dropped the Blue Devils from the top 10 to No. 16 in the AP poll. So what? If we were doing a college hoops draft, Parker is still the first pick. There’s only one guy in the country that would be in the conversation with him …

2. Doug McDermott, Creighton: … and that’s Dougie McBuckets. I hope everyone that gets a chance to watching Doug play this season truly appreciates what they’re watching. He’s unquestionably one of the best college basketball players that we’ve seen at any time in recent memory. You wanna know how good he is? The kid put of 30 points, 10 boards and five assists in a road win at Seton Hall and you heard nothing about it on Saturday. Not a peep. That’s because a night like that is not uncommon for McDermott, who is on the verge of becoming the first three-time first-team all-american since Patrick Ewing and Wayman Tisdale.

Here is a stat, sent out by Creighton’s SID, for you to chew on before I move on: McDermott is averaging 24.7 points and 7.5 boards and shooting 42.7% from three. Since 1998, the only other college player to post those numbers? Kevin Durant. Enjoy it while it lasts.

3. Deandre Kane, Iowa State: I’m not sure there is a more under-appreciated player in the country that Deandre Kane, who transferred to Iowa State after getting dismissed from the team at Marshall. He’s been the biggest reason the Cyclones are still undefeated.

Here’s a breakdown of Kane’s numbers compared to the other four point guards on this list:


4. Julius Randle, Kentucky: Randle’s numbers — 18.1 points and 10.6 boards — could look even more impressive if he didn’t bow out of the game against Louisville with cramps. You saw what he did, right? 17 points on 7-for-8 shooting in the first half.

source: Getty Images5. Tyler Ennis, Syracuse: A lot of people would pick C.J. Fair as the best player on Syracuse, but I think Ennis is easily the most valuable player and the biggest reason the Orange entered ACC play undefeated. He’s the only point guard on the roster, he’s a freshman, he doesn’t turn the ball over and he’s got a tremendous sense of timing. He seems to remain deferential until the exact moment the Orange need him to take over.

6. Marcus Smart, Oklahoma State: If you include the loss to Memphis, Marcus Smart has been rather human in the last seven games. His numbers: 12.3 points, 4.4 assists, 4.3 boards, 2.9 t/o’s and shooting numbers of 43.9/22.6/72.4.

7. Shabazz Napier, UConn: UConn had an awful, o-2 swing through Texas last week and outside of a 25-point second half against Houston, Napier was 2-for-14 from the floor with just 14 points. Not good enough.

8. Casey Prather, Florida: Prather’s last two games have been rather quiet, averaging just 11.0 points in wins over Richmond and Savannah State, but that doesn’t change the fact that he’s been the best player on Florida this season.

9. Nick Johnson, Arizona: The best perimeter defender, the best perimeter shoot and the leading scorer on the best team in the country deserves a spot on this list.

10. Keith Appling, Michigan State: It’s hard to pick just one guy off of the Michigan State team, but for my money, Appling’s play down the stretch in close games early in the season and the fact that he’s been the facilitator for this loaded offense sets him apart.

Others: Jordan Adams, Kyle Anderson, Ron Baker, Cameron Bairstow, Jahii Carson, Jordan Clarkson, Aaron Craft, Joel Embiid, C.J. Fair, Aaron Gordon, Rodney Hood, Marcus Paige, Lamar Patterson, Adreian Payne, Elfrid Payton, Russ Smith, T.J. Warren, Andrew Wiggins, Chaz Williams, Joseph Young