Tag: Pepperdine Waves

Marty Wilson

Pepperdine signs head coach Marty Wilson to five-year contract extension

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Picked to finish tied for seventh place in the WCC’s preseason poll, the Pepperdine Waves exceeded expectations in 2014-15. Marty Wilson’s team won 18 games, finishing fourth in the WCC and earning the program’s first postseason berth (CBI) since 2002. And with all five starters, led by forward Stacy Davis, returning to Malibu the 2015-16 season could be one in which the Waves take a step forward in the WCC.

With that being the case the school announced Thursday that it has come to terms with Wilson on a five-year contract extension. Wilson, who played at Pepperdine and is approaching his 19th season as either a player or coach at the school, now has a deal that will run through the 2020-21 campaign.

Pepperdine’s win total has increased in each of Wilson’s four seasons at the helm, and last year they proved to be one of the WCC’s best defensive teams despite losing 2014 WCC Defensive Player of the Year Brendan Lane to graduation.

In WCC games Pepperdine ranked second in the conference in scoring defense (61.2 ppg allowed) and field goal percentage defense (41.9 percent) and first in three-point percentage defense (28.2 percent). In all games Pepperdine ranked second nationally in three-point percentage defense, limiting opponents to 27 percent from beyond the arc.

Joining Davis (15.7 ppg, 7.8 rpg), one of the top players in the WCC, as returning starters are fellow forward Jett Raines (10.6, 5.1) and guards Jeremy Major (8.7, 3.4, 3.6 apg), Shawn Olden (9.2, 2.4) and Atif Russell (5.6, 2.9). The Waves also return key reserves Lamond Murray Jr. and Amadi Udenyi (12 letterwinners in total return).

WCC Midseason Catchup: No. 8 Gonzaga leads the way

Gonzaga v UCLA
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Kevin Pangos and the Bulldogs are off to an 11-1 start (Getty Images)

College basketball’s non-conference season is coming to a close, and to help you shake off post-holiday haze and the hangover of losing in your fantasy football playoffs, we’ll be providing you with some midseason primers to get you caught up on all the nation’s most important conferences.

MORE: All of CBT’s Conference Catchups

Today we’ll be taking a look at the WCC, with conference play set to begin Saturday.


The 10-3 Cougars have four players averaging double figures, with one of the nation’s best scorers in Haws leading the way. Averaging 22.6 points and 4.1 rebounds per game, Haws is shooting 48.6% from the field, 41 percent from three and 88.6% from the foul line.


  • Tyler Haws, BYU
  • Kyle Wiltjer, Gonzaga: Few transfers in America have been as productive as Wiltjer (16.8 ppg, 5.1 rpg) has been for the Bulldogs.
  • Brad Waldow, Saint Mary’s: Waldow’s averaging 21.7 points and 10.7 rebounds per game, shooting 55.5% from the field.
  • Stacy Davis, Pepperdine: Davis (16.2 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 2.2 apg) is a big reason why the Waves are off to a 7-3 start.
  • Kyle Collinsworth, BYU: Averaging 14.1 points, 8.1 rebounds and 5.6 assists per game, Collinsworth is the WCC’s most versatile player.


1. Gonzaga should be respected as a Final Four contender. Mark Few’s Bulldogs are ranked eighth nationally with an 11-1 record, with their lone defeat coming in overtime at No. 3 Arizona. Gonzaga’s front court, which features Wiltjer, Przemek Karnowski and Domantas Sabonis, has been very good and the addition of Byron Wesley on the wing has helped as well. Add in senior Kevin Pangos, and the Bulldogs enter league play with five players averaging at least ten points per game.

2. Anson Winder’s been an impact reserve for BYU. To this point in the season Winder has been the most improved player in the WCC, as he’s gone from averaging 6.5 points and 1.8 rebounds per game in 2013-14 to 14.7 points and 4.2 rebounds per contest for the Cougars. And after reaching double figures in ten games last season, Winder’s already done so in 11 of BYU’s 12 games in 2014-15. Haws and Collinsworth are going to do the “heavy lifting” for BYU offensively, but the production of Winder and Chase Fischer (13.7 ppg) has been important for Dave Rose’s squad.

3. Offensive balance will continue to be key for Portland. Eric Reveno’s Pilots are off to a 9-3 start to the season, and one reason for the start has been their balance. Four starters, led by guards Alec Wintering (11.7 ppg) and Kevin Bailey (11.5), are averaging at least 10.2 points per game. However Bailey’s missed time with a left foot injury, and it remains to be seen just how long the Pilots will play without their sixth man. Until then, freshman D’Marques Tyson (8.3 ppg) will be asked to step forward in his reserve role.


BYU guard Tyler Haws (Getty Images)

1. Gonzaga’s point guard depth. With Josh Perkins (broken jaw) out since late November and possibly redshirting, Pangos has spent even more time on the ball. With his experience having Pangos run the show is no problem at all, but who steps forward to give him a rest or allow Pangos to look for his offense off the ball on occasion? One thing to keep in mind here is the addition of Vanderbilt transfer Eric McClellan, who becomes eligible in early January. In 12 games at Vanderbilt last season, McClellan averaged 14.3 points, 4.4 rebounds and 3.2 assists per game.

2. The development of BYU’s front court. This became even more important when Nate Austin went down with a torn hamstring, thus leaving the Cougars without much in the way of experience in the paint. Players such as Luke Worthington, Isaac Neilson and Corbin Kaufusi have been asked to step forward, and they’ve all had their moments in the games since Austin’s injury. Austin’s numbers (3.3 ppg, 6.2 rpg) don’t jump off the page but he is BYU’s best big man when it comes to rebounding (Kyle Collinsworth leads all Cougars with 8.1 rpg), so the sooner he returns the better.

3. How many NCAA tournament bids will the WCC receive? Gonzaga’s a lock barring an epic collapse, and BYU looks to be in solid shape as well with their home win over Stanford looking better thanks to the Cardinal winning at Texas. But can the WCC earn more bids? Saint Mary’s has a win at Creighton on its resume, and they’ve also defeated two teams in New Mexico State and UC Irvine that should contend for their respective league titles, but that loss to Northern Arizona doesn’t help matters.


1. Gonzaga loses no more than three conference games for the 17th consecutive season. The Bulldogs will be challenged in conference play, especially on the road with a game at BYU opening things up Saturday. But this is a rather safe prediction to make given their track record. And they’ll once again win the WCC regular season title in the process.

2. Pepperdine will finish in the top half of the WCC. The Waves haven’t shot the ball as well as they would like, ranking eighth in field goal percentage and ninth in three-point percentage. But they’ve been good defensively, which is an important development for a team looking to account for the graduation of WCC Defensive POY Brendan Lane. Look for Stacy Davis and company to finish higher than seventh, which is what the league coaches predicted in October.

3. The WCC gets two NCAA tournament bids. While the story line to follow leaves open the door for Saint Mary’s, two bids seems likely for the WCC with Gonzaga and BYU being the recipients. Will Gonzaga have a shot at earning a one-seed for the second time in program history? By the time we get to late February, that may be the biggest NCAA tournament-related question for the WCC.

Pepperdine’s Stacy Davis looks to build on last season’s All-WCC selection

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Beginning on October 3rd and running up until November 14th, the first day of the season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2014-2015 NBCSports.com college hoops preview package.

Today, we are previewing the West Coast Conference.

MORE: 2014-2015 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule

As a freshman at Pepperdine in 2012-13 forward Stacy Davis put together a solid debut, posting averages of 11.2 points and 7.3 rebounds per game. Davis was named WCC Newcomer of the Year at the end of that season, and with such praise comes added attention from the opposition. And as a front court player who spent the majority of his time in the post as a freshman, for Davis that meant he would see even more double-teams as a sophomore.

Yet thanks to the combination of a much-improved perimeter shot and the addition of UCLA transfer Brendan Lane, Davis was able to deal with the extra attention and make the progression from being the WCC’s best freshmen to being one of its best players in 2013-14.

Davis accounted for 15.1 points and 7.6 rebounds per game last season, shooting 47.1% from the field and 46.9% from beyond the arc. The perimeter shooting is where the greatest strides were made, as he connected on 23 of his 49 three-point attempts and 40.1% of his two-point jumpers, according to hoop-math.com. By comparison, Davis attempted just two three-pointers (missing both) and made 36.5% of his two-point jumpers as a freshman. The 6-foot-6 forward worked hard to improve that aspect of his game prior to his sophomore season, and the end result was a factor in Pepperdine’s finishing fifth in the WCC after being picked to finish last in the preseason poll.

“One big thing I learned was patience,” Davis told NBCSports.com last week when asked what he learned as a freshmen that he was able to apply as a sophomore. “My freshman year we didn’t have the best record and it was filled with a lot of ups and downs. I learned from that and realized that everything comes in time, and you have to be patient.

“I applied that to the summer [before my sophomore year] as far as my workouts, just working hard and adding a three-point shot to my game and getting in shape and doing whatever I had to do.”

RELATED: NBCSports.com’s WCC Preview

Now comes the time to take another step forward, and unfortunately for Davis he had to deal with a broken bone in his right (shooting) hand in early October (the cast was removed last week). Having to miss “live” practice time is a detriment for sure, but there was a silver lining in this cloud for the All-WCC forward. According to Pepperdine head coach Marty Wilson, the injury led to Davis spending even more time working to strengthen his left hand. And while Davis won’t be an ambidextrous player in the aftermath of the injury, the ability to make greater use of his off hand is something that’s expected to help him deal with the attention he’ll continue to receive from the opposition.

“He had the cast on for about four weeks, and we’ve been doing a lot of coming in early to work on his left hand,” Wilson noted. “That was a big part of his development even before the injury, and [the injury] was almost a blessing in disguise that he wasn’t able to use that right hand. Jump hooks, passes, all kinds of different layups with his left hand to where he’s fully comfortable with it.

“So now when we put him in situations where he has an advantage against a bigger guy or a slower guy, when he goes to certain moves he’ll be able to finish either way. The other part of it is that the injury has allowed some of our young guys to be immersed in the stuff we run and get more reps so they can learn.”

That’s just one adjustment Davis will have to make, with the other being the need to help the Waves account for the graduation of Brendan Lane. In his one season on the court Lane was an impact player for Pepperdine, averaging 13.0 points, 7.3 rebounds and 2.4 blocks per contest. Offensively Lane’s ability to score inside, as he finished the season shooting 54.7% from the field, allowed Davis the freedom needed to step out onto the perimeter in search of scoring opportunities without having to deal with the double teams that would come frequently when he was in the post.

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Lane was even more important on the defensive end, as evidenced by his leading the WCC in blocked shots and being named WCC Defensive Player of the Year. Of Pepperdine’s three front court returnees only Davis saw significant action last season, with Jett Raines (11.7 mpg) and David Jesperson (9.3) being on the outskirts of the team’s interior rotation. In addition to Raines and Jesperson four newcomers will look to earn playing time, and while the progression of those players is important so is the need for Davis to have an even greater impact defensively. Davis led the team in rebounding a season ago, but the feeling in Malibu is that he’s capable of doing even more.

“The majority of the change is just me demanding more and holding him more accountable as a defender,” Wilson said. “We’ve seen him play different guys at times where he’s proven to us, and more importantly to himself, that he can guard guys when his mind is in it.

“My job is to hold him accountable to it, and we’re doing some different things that will challenge Stacy and his teammates to be better defensively.”

In total Pepperdine returns three starters, with sophomore guards Jeremy Major and Amadi Udenyi joining Davis. Major was one of the WCC’s best freshmen last season, as he accounted for 9.1 points, 4.5 assists and 3.2 rebounds per contest, and Udenyi put together a solid rookie campaign despite missing ten games due to injury. Add in sophomore wing Lamond Murray Jr. and freshmen Shawn Olden and A.J. Lapray (Oregon transfer), and Pepperdine is hopeful that they have enough to avoid a drop in the WCC standings.

But the task will be a difficult one, with Portland returning four starters (and seven of its top eight scorers), San Diego boasting the senior guard tandem of Christopher Anderson and Johnny Dee and Santa Clara having the high-scoring guards Jared Brownridge and Brandon Clark. What helps the Waves is that in Davis they have a player who’s proven to be one of the WCC’s toughest individual matchups. But there’s also more room for growth, and Davis has worked hard to ensure that he takes another step forward with regards to both production and leadership with Lane’s presence proving to be particular helpful with the latter department.

“He was very quiet as a leader but he always had that presence,” Davis said of Lane. “He taught me certain aspects of how to be a leader, but more importantly how to be a better teammate. He taught me things I can definitely apply to the team now, and with me being the leader I want to apply that aspect of being a great teammate and a great friend.

“That way when I am gone in two years it’s still going to be prevalent in the Pepperdine culture. He taught me a lot, and it’s going to be difficult without him. But with all teams you have to adjust, because something’s going to be different with your team every year. We’re a good team, and I think we’ll adjust.”