Tag: NCAA rules

University of Alabama

Alabama self-reported 13 minor violations last academic year, including one for men’s basketball


Minor rules violations aren’t seen as a huge deal amongst athletic departments, provided that there aren’t a massive number of them. If anything, finding and self-reporting such mistakes to the NCAA is seen as a sign that the school’s compliance department is doing its best to make sure that its coaches, administrators and athletes remain mindful of the rules.

Friday it was reported by the Tuscaloosa News that the Alabama athletic department self-reported 13 Level III or Level IV violations to the NCAA between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015. Football was responsible for a department-high five secondary infractions, and men’s basketball was among the programs to be reported as well.

The men’s basketball program and Crimson Tide Productions violated NCAA rules for using a prospect’s image to create a personalized recruiting aid during the player’s official visit.

Secondary violations generally don’t result in much more than additional education for the rule violator, and in this instance there was also a letter of admonition written by the school (who committed the violation was not disclosed). Not a huge deal for those involved; it simply serves as a reminder of the rules while also showing that compliance is doing its part to make sure those rules are being followed.

Report: Mother of Kansas forward has ties to firm specializing in ‘loans to potential high draft picks’

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Saturday afternoon Kansas freshman forward Cliff Alexander missed his third straight game due to an ongoing investigation into his eligibility by the NCAA. According to a Yahoo Sports report earlier this week, the NCAA is looking into the possibility that a family member may have received impermissible benefits.

Saturday afternoon Yahoo Sports reported that Alexander’s mother can be tied to a company that specializes in drafting loans to “potential high draft picks in the NBA and NFL.” Those loans are extended to athletes in their families after the prospect has declared himself eligible for the draft, not before.

According to the report a Universal Commercial Code (UCC) was secured by Ludus Capital, a financial company based in Florida, last August. According to USLegal.com, a UCC “is applicable in sales, leases, negotiable instruments, bank deposits, funds transfers, letters of credit, bulk transfers and bulk sales, warehouse receipts, bills of lading and other documents of title, investment securities, and secured transactions of commercial transactions.”

The question is how this would apply to a situation in which a family member could possibly receive a loan with the player’s future NBA earnings being used to repay the loan in the future. The filing was made in Alexander’s home state of Illinois. Also of note in the report is that the family met with various agents in August, and the meetings are not against NCAA rules as noted in the most recent Yahoo Sports report.

Alexander’s family took meetings with NBA agents during August, sources said. Discussions with agents for the purpose of gaining information on a player’s market value do not violate NCAA rules, but entering into a written or verbal agreement and receiving compensation is a violation.

Complicating matters in regards to when (or if) Alexander will be able to return to the floor is the fact that the family has retained legal counsel. The NCAA has yet to interview the freshman, and that is something that has to take place before there’s any conversation about possible reinstatement.

With Perry Ellis (sprained knee) sidelined and Brannen Greene (who was suspended for Saturday’s game) and Wayne Selden Jr. (ankle) also banged up, Kansas has personnel issues to deal with during the most important stretch of the season. With that being the case, Alexander’s situation clearly doesn’t help matters.

NCAA declares Geno Auriemma’s phone call to Mo’ne Davis a secondary violation

Geno Auriemma

Wednesday it was reported that an unnamed school turned in UConn head coach Geno Auriemma for his phone call to Philadelphia little leaguer Mo’ne Davis during the Little League World Series. Originally it was thought that, since Davis is in the eighth grade, the call did not violate any NCAA rules because she wasn’t considered to be a “recruitable athlete.” However that isn’t the case, and on Thursday it was reported by the Hartford Courant that the NCAA has determined the phone call to be a secondary violation of NCAA rules.

The phone call was deemed to be a violation of NCAA bylaw, which states that in women’s basketball a phone call cannot be made to an individual (or their parent or guardian) prior to September 1 of their junior year of high school. The key word in that bylaw is “individual,” which has a broader definition than if the phrase “recruitable athlete” were used.

It’s safe to say that UConn athletic director Warde Manuel was none too thrilled with the NCAA’s decision, despite the fact that the “penalty” for most secondary violations is simply some more education on the rules.

“Prior to attempting to reach Davis, Coach Auriemma checked with the UConn compliance department and was advised such a call would be permissible since Davis is not considered a prospective student-athlete by the NCAA and the call was to be congratulatory rather than recruiting in nature.

“While UConn will continue to adhere to the NCAA and conference rules, I believe that upon request from a friend to Geno, a proud Philadelphian, to call a young lady representing the City of Brotherly Love who had accomplished historic feats in the Little League World Series, should not constitute a violation especially due to the fact that NCAA rules do not classify Mo’ne as a prospective student-athlete.”

As noted above, a secondary violation isn’t a crippling blow to a program by any means. Maybe a conversation about how to not run afoul of certain rules will occur, but not much else.