Tag: Massachusetts Minutemen

Chaz Williams

Late Night Snacks: UMass outruns VCU

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Game of the night: Massachusetts 80, VCU 75

During the Atlantic 10 media day, I spoke with Massachusetts coach Derek Kellogg about his team’s three-point dependence. Since he arrived at UMass, Kellogg’s squads were content to jack a high percentages of threes, consistently posting a three-point attempts percentage in the mid-30s. After asking Kellogg whether this trend would continue for the sixth year, he stressed the team would ease their diet of long-range indulgence: “We need to be even more selective from three this year because of the level of play [in the conference].” Against VCU, the Minutemen attempted eight threes, but whiffed on all eight (as he explained in the post game presser, “Once we were 0 for 6, I told my guys to stop shooting 3s. I told them, ‘Why settle? Get to the free throw line'”), the first time since March 2006 that a UMass team has failed to hit a three. As he maintained during the preseason, though, UMass is now more offensively efficient because of their refusal to settle — the squad’s three-point attempts percentage is 25.6 percent, one of the nation’s lowest rates, and just 20 percent of their A10 points come from beyond the arc (compared with the percentage of points, 60 percent, within the three-point line). In the win versus the Rams, UMass both got to the line (20 of 27) and didn’t force their offense (48 percent), scoring .94 PPP against a team that prides itself on wreaking defensive havoc.

Important outcomes

Siena 67, Manhattan 63: If the Jaspers had made little more than half of 42 free throws they attempted versus Siena, Steve Masiello’s team would have secured the victory. The win is significant for two reasons: it muddies the top tier of the MAAC, as Manhattan is now third in conference play with two home games remaining; this is the biggest win for Jimmy Patsos at Siena, and since only ten other DI teams have less experience than this season’s squad, Siena should quickly ascend the MAAC rankings.

Florida Gulf Coast 75, Mercer 61
: Is FGCU ready to make another run? Similar to last year’s squad, the Eagles lost to Mercer in their first regular season match-up before winning the next game (and in the case of the 2013 team, also winning the third game, which was the conference tournament title). Defense is analogous to success for new coach Joe Dooley, and the Eagles strove to limit Mercer to one offensive possession at a time, corralling an impressive 34 defensive rebounds.

Iona 80, Rider 77: With under fifteen minutes remaining in the second half, Iona, thanks to a made three from Sean Armand, led Rider by thirteen points. A scant fourteen minutes later, that lead was cut to three, and the Gaels, rather than let an opportunity to put a game between itself and Manhattan slip away, was forced to desperately hold on to the win. Iona’s usual suspects — Sean Armand and A.J. English — had twenty point games, but the real star was Rider’s Jimmie Taylor, a guard who scored 13 straight points in the final minutes.

Travis Bader (Oakland)
The 6-foot-5 wing threw off the mental handcuffs Wright State had placed on him during Oakland’s recent loss, converting four of six threes and attempting twelve free throws in a win over UIC.

Jimmie Taylor (Rider)

A budding long-range star, Taylor scored 19 points overall in the loss, and was instrumental in Rider’s comeback.

Jamail Jones (Florida Gulf Coast)

Jones isn’t one to hang out on the interior all game and grab defensive rebounds — the wing has grabbed more than five defensive boards just a handful of occasions in 2014 — but his play on the glass (ten defensive rebounds) helped stymie Mercer’s offense.

Briante Weber (VCU)
Weber, whose spent this season transitioning to VCU’s full-time, true point guard, hit a large speed bump, committed six turnovers.

Steven Spieth (Brown)
Referees ruled Spieth had foul a Maodo Lo by impeding his path to a loose rebound, and Lo, an 84 percent free throw shooter, made both attempts to break to tie and give Columbia a home win.

UIC’s offense

Oakland has always been known more for its offensive, and not defensive, schemes, but the former Summit League member limited UIC to just over one point per possession and only twelve two-point field goal makes.

-It’s possible to make both the struggled and notables list in the same night! When Briante Weber recorded three steals, he became the first Ram to surpass 100 steals in a single season. He is swiping five steals per 40 minutes, and since VCU still has four regular season games remaining (not including the A10 tourney and a possible postseason appearance), Weber should boost this record substantially.

Sunday’s Pregame Shootaround: Louisville has first test of the season against North Carolina

Rick Pitino, Russ Smith
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GAME OF THE DAY: No. 3 Louisville vs. No. 24 North Carolina, 1:00 p.m. (ESPN) 

North Carolina isn’t the team that many projected in the preseason thanks to the absence of P.J. Hairston and Leslie McDonald, but the Tar Heels still have enough firepower to challenge Louisville in the championship game of the Hall of Fame Tipoff at Mohegan Sun. Louisville defeated Fairfield 71-57, while North Carolina earned a solid win over Richmond, 82-72, the the semifinal games yesterday.

THE OTHER GAME OF THE DAY: Virginia Commonwealth vs. Georgetown, 2:00 p.m. (ESPNU)

Georgetown is feeling the ill effects of losing Otto Porter to the NBA and has struggled in the early going with losses to Oregon and Northeastern — the latter loss very disconcerting as the Hoyas were outscored 38-20 in the second half en route to a 63-56 loss. Things don’t get easier as they have to now cope with VCU’s havoc defense. Look for Georgetown to feature Josh Smith on the offensive end as he will have a distinct size advantage against VCU.

MID-MAJOR MATCHUP OF THE DAY: North Dakota vs. North Dakota State, 6:00 p.m.

If you like scoring and three-pointers, keep an eye on this game between these in-state rivals. North Dakota State has high aspirations this season as they return Taylor Braun, among others, but North Dakota is a solid team in their own right as they showed against Wisconsin last Tuesday. The Bagders are good this season, and North Dakota hung with them for much of the game, eventually succumbing 103-85.


1) Will UMass continue their hot start and knock off another BCS opponent in Clemson? On the young season, UMass has already defeated Boston College, LSU, Youngstown State, Nebraska, and — most impressively — New Mexico. A win against the Tigers, and don’t be surprised to see the Minutemen in the Top 25 come Monday.

2) Another Massachusetts school, Harvard has their first true test of the season as they travel to Colorado. It’s been hard to gauge just how good the Crimson are, but we should learn much more about them against Colorado. The match-up between Harvard’s guards Siyani Chambers and Wesley Saunders vs. Colorado’s Spencer Dinwiddie and Askia Booker will be a good battle.

3) Providence has impressed thus far, compiling a 5-0 record with solid wins over Boston College and Vanderbilt. Against Vanderbilt, the Friars ended the game on a 27-4 run to win 67-60. They have another good test today against La Salle. Seniors Bryce Cotton and Kadeem Batts have been tremendous, and the Friars are looking like a team that has the potential to make the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2004.

4) Maryland has gotten off to a slow start with losses to Connecticut and Oregon State, and their game against Northern Iowa at the Paradise Jam in St. Thomas figures to be a tough one. Nick Faust has to be better in order for the Terps to get on track — through four games he is shooting just 36% on two-pointers and 22% on three-pointers.

5) You should be paying close attention to Belmont this season; the Bruins are for real and very good. Fresh off of their win against North Carolina last weekend, they dismantled rival Lipscomb 94-64, and then had a solid victory against Holy Cross last night. Through six games, they have eclipsed the 80 point mark five times, and have one of the most efficient offenses in college basketball. Belmont doesn’t figure to be challenged much by Hofstra today.


  • No. 6 Duke vs. Vermont, 6:30 p.m. (ESPNU)
  • No. 14 Michigan vs. Charlotte, 6:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
  • No. 17 Oregon vs. San Francisco, 8:00 p.m. (Pac-12 Network)
  • No. 19 New Mexico vs. Davidson, currently airing on ESPNU
  • No. 22 UCLA vs. Chattanooga, 10:00 p.m. (Pac-12 Network)


  • UAB vs. Temple, 6:30 p.m. (ESPN3)
  • Florida State vs. Northeastern, 4:30 p.m. (ESPN2)
  • Richmond vs. Fairfield, 3:00 p.m. (ESPN3)

Billy Baron is motivated now more than ever to lead Canisius

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Billy Baron (GoGriffs.com)

All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here.

Billy Baron wasn’t supposed to play at Canisius.

Near the end of his post-graduate year at Worcester Academy in 2010 and after much deliberation of whether to play for his father, Jim, at the University of Rhode Island, or at a bigger basketball school, Baron elected to play for Tony Bennett at Virginia.

He was supposed to be a staple in the Cavaliers’ backcourt and, notching 19 points in Virginia’s season-opening game against William & Mary, the future looked bright for Baron. Ultimately, as the season unfolded, Baron’s playing time dwindled leading him to transfer back to his home state of Rhode Island to play for his father. The decision was not easy and one he wrestled with before deciding that for the betterment of his basketball career, transferring was the best move.

Baron told NBCSports.com by phone: “Obviously, transferring wasn’t the plan, but it motivated me a tremendous amount, more than I ever thought that I could be motivated. I met a lot of great people [at Virginia] and still stay in touch with the coaching staff. I keep in contact with Joe Harris; he’ll be one of my best friends for life…Transferring was just a wall to get over. It set a bar for me and motivated me.”

(CLICK HERE to read NBCSports.com’s MAAC Preview)

When Baron transferred to Rhode Island, he was able to play right away for his father who had led the Rams to four straight 20+ win seasons and postseason appearances. It was a program where Baron’s older brother, Jimmy, was a four-year letter winner for and one of the school’s top three-point shooters in history.

Billy grew up around the Rhode Island basketball program with his father having coached there beginning in 2001, when Billy was just ten years old. It was a homecoming of sorts when he transferred to URI, which is why when his father was fired at the conclusion of the 2011-12 season finishing out the academic year was such a difficult task.

“I would have never transferred to URI if I thought my Dad only had one year [left as coach]. It came as a complete shock to me after we lost to UMass in the final game of the year when he told me he got fired at 8:00 AM the next morning; I was completely shocked. I had to finish the semester there, walk from class to class, go to lunch – you know it was just extremely tough knowing my father wasn’t there. Rhode Island really became a part of the family with my brother playing there and dad coaching – when I was the only one left, I knew I couldn’t stay.”

It didn’t take long for a school to scoop up Jim Baron. Just weeks after he was fired at Rhode Island, Canisius hired Baron in early April of 2012. That summer, Billy transferred to Canisius where he was granted immediate eligibility. It has been a whirlwind of a college basketball career, but Billy has found a home at Canisius.

“When I tell you that I was motivated more than ever after transferring from Virginia, now I was at a whole new level. I had to back my father up. I’m so thankful that Canisius welcomed me with open arms and believe in me like they did with my father. I can’t tell you how good it feels to be back at Canisius for a second year, and not have to go through that whole process again of building relationships with teammates and learning my way around a new school.”

(CLICK HERE to read through the rest of NBCSports.com’s feature stories)

Now that he had found a home, it was time to win. Baron was part of a 16-15 team during his lone season at Virginia, and then a 7-24 team at Rhode Island. Entering a program who won just five games in 2011-12, winning was becoming a foreign concept.

That quickly changed. Canisius posted solid early-season wins against Boston University and St. Bonaventure, but their signature win that garnered the attention of the college basketball community came against Temple, a 72-62 victory to move to 8-2 on the season.

“I think I had forgotten the feeling, a little bit, of what it was like to win,” Baron said. “As a team, we weren’t all that surprised that we won 20 games, although I am sure that everyone outside of our locker room was, and why not after winning just five games the year prior.”

Canisius went 12-12 to close out the season, which was a minor disappointment given their hot start. Considering they improved their record by 15 wins though, last season should be viewed as nothing short of a success — the Barons helped to turn around the program in just a season. Billy is hardly satisfied, though: “If you look at the schedule [last year], we beat Temple, but then kind of struggled down the stretch. We weren’t able to win more than three games in a row and lost a lot of close games that we didn’t know how to close out…To go from five wins to 20 wins was great, but now it’s got to carry over from 20 to 25 to even 30. That’s something I feel we can do.”

The ultimate goal, as is the case for many mid-major programs in the country, is to win the league championship and advance to the NCAA Tournament — something Canisius hasn’t accomplished since 1996.

There was no questioning Canisius’ offensive ability last season as they averaged 73.5 ppg (41st nationally), but the defense proved to be the Achilles heel. Baron explained that improvement on the defensive end is an absolute must to reach that next level: “It’s really going to start on the defensive end. When you look back at that Iona game [in the MAAC tournament], we lost 89-85 and, even though it’s Iona, you can’t give up 89 points and expect to win. Getting key stops in the second half to close teams out – getting scores after those stops – is so important. It has to be a full team effort on the defensive end.”

Expectations are, no doubt, much higher this year than last. In the MAAC preseason poll, Canisius was picked to finish third in the 11 team conference behind Manhattan and Iona, but that’s just fine, according to Baron: “Being picked to finish third in the conference, we are kind of behind the scenes which is perfect for us. With Iona and Manhattan picked ahead of us, we are fine staying behind the scenes and then hopefully get hot come March.”