Tag: Mark Emmert

Mark Emmert (AP Photo)

Mark Emmert calls UNC scandal ‘troubling’, ‘disturbing’, ‘shocking’


Now that the Wainstein Report has been made public, the academic scandal that has hung over the head of North Carolina the last three years is now reaching the final stages. The NCAA is investigating the matter, and at some point they will be announcing what, if any, punishment will be handed down.

It’s an issues that the Tar Heel football and basketball programs will be anxiously waiting for. As Dan Wetzel so astutely pointed out last week, if the NCAA has any teeth left, they will be forced to bring the hammer down on UNC. Their defense in every lawsuit that is currently facing the organization is that college sports should be an academic endeavor first and foremost. They don’t have to pay the players for their athletic exploits, or even for the rights to their images and likenesses, because they should be just fine receiving an education as compensation.

UNC didn’t put in an effort to get these kids educated. They essentially allowed them to major in eligibility. Their punishment could end up being massive, and based on an interview NCAA president game to the Associated Press, it sounds like the NCAA is taking this seriously.

“Just based on the (Kenneth) Wainstein report, this is a case that potentially strikes at the heart of what higher education is about,” Emmert said Monday. “Universities are supposed to take absolutely most seriously the education of their students, right? I mean that’s why they exist, that’s their function in life. If the Wainstein report is accurate, then there was severe, severe compromising of all those issues, so it’s deeply troubling. … It’s absolutely disturbing that we find ourselves here right now.”

“When you look at what we all know today, the Wainstein report, and just based upon that,” Emmert added, “you look at the, I look at these facts, like everyone, and I find them shocking.”

How do you think the NCAA should punish UNC?

Mark Emmert’s $1.7 million salary is 46% more than his predecessor’s


Mark Emmert is the president of an organization that forbids young athletes with a valuable, marketable talent from profiting off of their ability, and he gets paid handsomely for it.

According to a report from USA Today, Emmert’s salary in 2011, as listed on the NCAA’s tax return, was $1.674 million. COO Jim Isch earned $977,531.

Those numbers aren’t all that surprising, to be frank. Neither is the fact that in Emmert’s first full year on the job, he made 46% more than the man he succeeded, Myles Brand, did in his final year on the job. Isch’s salary was up more than $225,000 than it was the year before.

All the suits are getting massive raises as the NCAA’s revenues explode with the new round of TV deals.

And the players responsible for those deals?

They’re getting the same old scholarships they were 50 years ago.

Senate Commerce Committee grills NCAA president Mark Emmert

Mark Emmert
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Since it was announced that the Senate Commerce Committee would hold its meeting on the state of collegiate athletics on Wednesday, rescheduling a hearing originally scheduled to be held in May, one of the questions was how the committee would handle NCAA president Mark Emmert. The much-maligned Emmert serves as the face of the NCAA, acting on behalf of the institutions that he represents.

And in discussing his responsibilities as president Wednesday, Emmert opened himself up to a pointed remark/question from Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill.

This was one of many key moments during Wednesday’s hearing, which consisted not only of criticisms of the current model but also questions/suggestions as to what can be done to improve the situation. Also of note during Sen. McCaskill’s comments was her referencing a study she’d done with regard to the way in which schools handle sexual assault cases.

According to the study more than 20 percent of institutions in the national sample provide no sexual assault response training at all for members of their faculty and staff, and more than 30 percent of schools do not provide any sexual assault training for students. Also of note was the finding that more than 20 percent of schools conducted fewer investigations than the number of incidents they reported to the Department of Education.

And there was also the fact that more than 20 percent of the schools allow their athletic departments to have oversight in incidents involving athletes.

In his testimony Emmert expressed his desire for multi-year scholarships (“scholarships for life”), something that some member schools have already made strides towards doing with Indiana and USC being two of the institutions, and the need to meet the full cost of attendance for scholarship athletes. Emmert wasn’t the only person to testify, with former Florida State football player Myron Rolle also participating, and Sen. Cory Booker used the word “exploitation” in offering his thoughts on the current state of college athletics.

It’s been stated that regardless of what the verdict handed down by Judge Claudia Wilken in the Ed O’Bannon lawsuit, changes are coming in collegiate athletics. If Wednesday’s hearing on Capitol Hill is any indication, more people with influence are looking to make sure that happens.