Marcus Smart

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Marcus Smart’s mom reportedly hospitalized the day he shoved Texas Tech fan

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Marcus Smart’s story has been told many times since he we from being a freshman sensation at Oklahoma State to one of the nation’s most polarizing players as a sophomore and, eventually, the No. 6 pick in the NBA Draft to the Boston Celtics.

He grew up in a tough neighborhood in Lancaster, Texas. He watched as a number of his close friends and family members passed away. He had brothers that were in gangs. He battled some serious behavioral issues as a kid.

And while we know all that, it’s still worth reading today’s feature from the Boston Globe’s Baxter Holmes on Smart. It’s very well-reported and provides some details and insights that we were previously unaware of.

Not only from his childhood.

Smart played a major role in one of the most controversial incidents of the season, when he went into the stands and shoved a fan during an Oklahoma State loss at Texas Tech. He was suspended for three games, the tipping point for the national perception of Smart.

MORE: Video of Marcus Smart shoving a Texas Tech fan | But was Smart justified?

Intense, competitive and passionate turned into hot-headed, out of control, a liability.

Holmes provided us with more context into that night in his story:

Then in February of his sophomore year, just before tip-off at Texas Tech, Marcus was told that his mother had been rushed to the hospital and that she did not want him to know.

“I was scared,” he says. “It was heavy on my mind and my heart.”

Camellia, whose blood pressure was acting up, watched from her hospital bed as Marcus lost his temper on court, engaging in an altercation with a fan late in the game — an altercation that began with the fan allegedly calling him a “trashy [racial expletive],” Michael says.

That still doesn’t excuse Smart’s actions, but when you combine that with everything else he was dealing with — the loss was their fifth in six games, Smart played awful during that stretch, he was losing his cool in prior games — it’s does help you understand why he did what he did.

Returning to school is costly financially, but money isn’t always the motivation

James Michael McAdoo
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James Michael McAdoo will find himself in an awkward position during Thursday night’s NBA Draft.

He’ll spend the night waiting for his phone to ring, hoping that he did enough over the course of his three years at North Carolina to convince an NBA team to use a second round pick on him.

That’s no guarantee, however. McAdoo is currently projected as the No. 50 pick in Chad Ford’s most recent mock draft. Draft Express has McAdoo going undrafted.

Two years ago, it would have been inconceivable to think that McAdoo could eventually end up as an undrafted free agent. As a freshman with the Tar Heels, McAdoo spent much of the season buried on the bench before an injury to John Henson late in the year opened up playing time for him. And while he wasn’t overly dominant — he averaged 10.6 points and 4.6 boards in seven postseason games as the Tar Heels were one Kendall Marshall injury away from being a real threat to win the 2012 national title — his athleticism and promising performance was enough to vault him into the lottery consideration.

Two years ago, had McAdoo gone pro, he very well could have spent the 2012 NBA Draft sitting in the Green Room.

That’s a long way to fall.

MORE: Underrated Prospects | Overrated Prospects | Top Ten Players in Five Years | Busts?

“Not at all,” McAdoo told when asked whether or not he regrets his decision to return to school. “It’s something that people ask me all the time. At the end of the day, I enjoyed my time at UNC.”

A number of factors played a role in that decision: McAdoo wanted a chance to win a national title, and coming so close while having an injury to one player cost them that chance left a bitter taste in his mouth. He also wanted a chance to be a leader at the collegiate level, to play major minutes every night in front of a raucous Dean Dome crowd. He knew that his family wasn’t in dire need of the money that he would make, he knew that he needed to grow as a person and, frankly, he liked being a college kid.

But that doesn’t change the fact that the decision he made has already cost him millions. Let’s say that McAdoo would have ended up being the 14th pick in the 2012 draft. He would have been guaranteed $3.107 million over the first two years of that contract, and if the team that picked him would have exercised their option for years three and four, and he accepted a qualifying option for year five, that contract would have been worth a total of $10.628 million. There are a lot of ‘ifs’ there, I know, but that’s a lot of potential income that vanished.

“I’m not going to be able to change it,” McAdoo said. “Obviously, I could have came out and got picked high, but I know God’s got my back. I’m just going to do whatever it takes.

“I know the circumstances are a lot different than they would have been freshman year.”

McAdoo isn’t the only player that has cost themselves quite a bit of money in recent years by deciding to return to school. The most notable player in that group is probably Marcus Smart, the former Oklahoma State point guard. Smart could have ended up being the No. 1 pick in the 2013 NBA Draft had he left school as a freshman, but he opted to return to Stillwater for a sophomore season that saw him fail to show an improvement in his jumper, struggle to control his emotions on the court and get suspended for three games for pushing a fan during a game at Texas Tech.

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Most importantly, Smart’s return made Oklahoma State a preseason top ten team and a favorite to win the Big 12. They lost seven straight leagues games and Smart left school without a single NCAA tournament win.

“Everything that happened this season, I wouldn’t change it for a thing,” Smart said in April at the NBA draft combine. “It helped me. It got me ready for the NBA and things that come in the NBA.”

“I never regretted coming back,” he said after the Pokes were eliminated from the NCAA tournament. “It was my decision, and it’s what I really wanted. So I’m very happy with the decision I made.”

Recent years have been littered with players who plummeted in the draft after returning to school. Michigan’s Mitch McGary was projected as a lottery pick as tearing up the 2013 NCAA tournament and leading the Wolverines to a national title game. A back injury ended his sophomore season and a positive test for marijuana forced him to turn pro this year, where he’s a borderline first round pick. Perry Jones III and Jared Sullinger were all projected top five picks in the 2011 NBA Draft and returned to school. Sullinger went 21st in 2012. Jones went 28th.

But does that mean it was the wrong decision?

It depends on what that player values.

Returning to school will provide NBA front office types with more time to refine their scouting reports on a prospect. Instead of harping on potential, embracing the positives of what a player is able to do, they can nitpick at what he can’t do, what he wasn’t able to actually improve on in his extra year on campus. It creates the opportunity for injuries to ruin a season or for an off-the-court incident to tarnish an image, a brand. That extra year can expose a player’s faults, provide proof that he’s not as good as his reputation.

RELATED: Elfrid Payton, the Draft’s biggest sleeper | Balancing potential, running a program

All of that is a risk to the amount of guaranteed money that can be made from a first contract, saying nothing about the fact that it’s one less year that a player will be able to receive a salary beyond a scholarship.

If money is your motivation, returning to school is rarely your best bet.

But not every athlete is simply motivated by the number of zeroes on his paycheck.

Some guys need that extra year in school to mature, to learn how to handle media criticism or manage their money or simply grow out of the mindset of being a college kid and into one of being a professional basketball player.

That’s why Smart returned to school. He wanted another year before basketball became his job. He wanted another year to spend time with his friends on the Oklahoma State team. He even admitted to knowing the financial implications of his decision, saying at the time “I am aware of how much money I am giving up.”

And that’s why McAdoo says he would never counsel a player to go pro simply because of the paycheck that he would stand to cash.

“I think that at the end of the day it just comes down to what your personal goals are,” he said. “There’s a lot of guys kill to get into the spot I’m in right. It’s not stressful for me.

“But it’s tough going up against other guys that are in a similar predicament where they are not guaranteed come June 26th that their name called.”

2014 NBA Draft Preview: Six first round prospects that will be busts

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The NBA Draft is on June 26th, meaning that there are less than a week until the next crop of potential NBA all-stars find out where they will be headed to begin their professional basketball careers. Over the course of the next few days, we will be using the expertise that we’ve gained from watching far too much college basketball to give you our insights on some of these prospects.

Today, we take a look at six first round prospects from this draft will think will be busts in the NBA:

MOREUnderrated Prospects | Overrated Prospects | Top Ten Players in Five Years

1. Zach LaVine, UCLA

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 13), Chad Ford (No. 18)
  • Scott Phillips: “LaVine was head-and-shoulders above every other prospect participating in the NBA DraftCombine, but not many potential lottery picks were going through the drills. He’s a ridiculous vertical athlete with a good one-dribble pull-up, but he has no clue how to play the game of basketball. LaVine looked lost in half-court settings and has a step learning curve ahead of him if he wants a long NBA career.”
  • Raphielle Johnson: “Excellent athlete, but I’m not sold on his ability to run a team at this point in time. Maybe he’ll be best as a combo, but we’ll see.”
  • Rob Dauster: “Zach LaVine will win any dunk contest that he enters. He’s got three-point range, too. But beyond that, LaVine’s essentially a blank canvas when it comes to basketball. On the one hand, that means that whoever drafts him can mold him into the player they want. It also means it’s up to LaVine to put in the work to reach his admittedly high ceiling. Drafting him is essentially betting on his work ethic.”

2. Tyler Ennis, Syracuse

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 19), Chad Ford (No. 20)
  • RD: “Ennis is dropping on draft boards as we get closer to the big day, and it makes sense. The NBA is trending towards big, elite level athletes at the point, and for all Ennis does well, he’s not on that level athletically. He knows how to play, so I think he’ll be able to hang around for a few years, but I don’t know what he does at an NBA level.”
  • SP: “Tyler Ennis had a wonderful freshman year at Syracuse, but I don’t think he’s a big-time NBADraft prospect. He’s an average athlete with average shooting percentages (41% FG, 35% 3PT) and that doesn’t even factor the giant question mark he is on the defensive end. With so many elite NBA point guards, I don’t see how Ennis makes a big impact in the league without a good first step or an ability to finish at the rim.”

RELATEDElfrid Payton, the Draft’s biggest sleeper | Balancing potential, running a program

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3. Marcus Smart, Oklahoma State

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 6), Chad Ford (No. 8)
  • RJ: “What happens when teams force him to hit perimeter shots? That’s the big question.”
  • SP: “For being such a highly-touted player and floor leader, Smart never got better at Oklahoma State and never won a NCAA Tournament game in two seasons. His power game won’t translate nearly as well in the NBA and his jump shot needs to improve a lot for him to be a complete weapon on offense.”

4. Mitch McGary, Michigan

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 30), Chad Ford (No. 26)
  • Terrence Payne: “Six NCAA tournament games in 2013 launched him into the lottery, but he has played eight games in the last 15 months.”
  • RD: “The offensive skill set at this time is a concern. But he works hard, so maybe strides can be made in that area.”

RELATED2014 NBA Draft Preview

5. Jerami Grant, Syracuse

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 27), Chad Ford (No. 40)
  • RD: “Grant is an elite-level athlete, but he’s stuck in that spot where he’s not really a small forward but not big enough to play along the front line. Does he have a post move? Can he play on the perimeter? What position does he guard?”

6. P.J. Hairston, North Carolina/D-League

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 23), Chad Ford (No. 24)
  • SP: “Besides the off-the-court questions that Hairston will face from every team, he’s a bonafide shot-jacker that rarely passes — Hairston averaged less than an assist a game in over 32 minutes a game in the D-League — and is prone to mental lapses on the defensive end. The D-League is filled with professional players, but the structure of the league, especially defensively, leaves a lot to be desired and his scoring numbers could end up being inflated because of this.”

2014 NBA Draft Preview: Five Overrated NBA Draft Prospects

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The NBA Draft is on June 26th, meaning that there are less than two weeks until the next crop of potential NBA all-stars find out where they will be headed to begin their professional basketball careers. Over the course of the next few days, we will be using the expertise that we’ve gained from watching far too much college basketball to give you our insights on some of these prospects.

Today, we give you the most overrated prospects:

RELATED: Underrated Prospects | 2014 NBA Draft Preview

1. Zach LaVine, UCLA

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 15), Chad Ford (No. 15)
  • Raphielle Johnson: “He didn’t see much time at the point due to the presence of Kyle Anderson and Bryce Alford. Play the ‘blame game’ if you want about this (especially when concerning Alford, as some have done), but that’s a concern especially given where LaVine has been projected to go in the draft.”
  • Terrence Payne: “Elite athleticism and the ability to knock down shots make him intriguing for front office executives, but it will be an uphill battle for him to move into a lead guard role.”
  • Rob Dauster: “Zach LaVine is an absolute freak athletically. He can also shoot the ball from three. But he’s a long way away from being capable on contributing at the next level.”

2. Marcus Smart, Oklahoma State

  • Projections: DX (No. 4), CF (No. 8)
  • Scott Phillips: “Marcus Smart’s sophomore-year shooting chart makes me gag. He’s a mediocre catch-and-shoot player and didn’t get much better in between seasons at Oklahoma State. Smart’s shooting percentages are very average, he doesn’t get easy baskets for other players as often as he should and his physicality around the hoop won’t take him as far in the NBA as it did in college.”
  • RJ: “I’m not worried about the temper at all. What I am worried about is the perimeter shooting, whether it’s on the catch or off the dribble in pick and roll situations.”
  • TP: “The ex-Oklahoma State guard has incredible physical tools, and he likely makes an impact right away on the defensive end of the floor. However, he failed to improve his jumper after returning for a sophomore season.”
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3. Mitch McGary, Michigan

  • Projections: DX (No. 30), CF (No. 2nd round)
  • RD: “McGary had one good month at the collegiate level, and he was successful because he was bigger, stronger and outworked opposing big men. He can’t rely on that in the NBA. He’s also 22 and already has a bad back.”
  • RJ: “The back is fine, but how much work is there to do from an offensive skill set standpoint? Will he be able to get points with his back to the basket? That will take some time.”
  • SP: “Between the back injury and his advanced age — he’s already 22 years old, which is ancient for a NBA rookie — it doesn’t look good for McGary’s draft stock. McGary might have been a lottery pick after his freshman season, but it was based off of a NCAA Tournament run and not an entire season of consistent production, which he never showed at the college level.”

4. Jerami Grant, Syracuse

  • Projections: DX (No. 27), CF (No. 25)
  • SP: “I still don’t know what he does well or how it translates to the NBA? Grant is a tremendous athlete with some upside, but his skill level is mediocre and he doesn’t have a fit in the NBA. Grant is far away from being a solid all-around player or even a rotational player with some skill that will earn him minutes.”
  • RJ: “Given Syracuse’s lack of scoring one would think his offensive skill set would have expanded last year. Not sure that was the case, and that’s a concern.”

5. Doug McDermott, Creighton

  • Projections: DX (No. 8), CF (No. 9)
  • SP: “I can see Doug McDermott having a nice, long NBA career, but a top-10 pick in a draftlike this? I just don’t see it. McDermott has struggled a bit with length in his career and there’s still the question of who he defends at the next level? That’s not taking away from McDermott’s prolific college career or his natural scoring acumen, but he has a long ways to go to be a well-rounded pro forward.”
  • RD: “I can see McDermott turning into some combination of Danny Green, Jason Kapono and Mike Miller. I think he’ll have a long career as a role player in the NBA. I’m not sure he should be a top ten pick.”


Marcus Smart has no regrets regarding decision to return for sophomore season

Marcus Smart

Former Oklahoma State guard Marcus Smart’s decision to return for his sophomore season was seen as a perplexing one by some people, as it’s rare to see a surefire lottery pick turn down the seven figures they’d make as a rookie in the NBA. And with the 2014 NBA Draft having the look of one being far superior to the 2013 edition, there were even some who opined that Smart was costing himself money by returning to Stillwater.

Unfortunately for Smart, while his numbers were solid the season did not go as smoothly as he and his fellow Cowboys had hoped. As a team Oklahoma State went from being ranked in the Top 10 in December to landing in the 8/9 game in the NCAA tournament, falling to Gonzaga in the Round of 64.

Add in the three-game suspension Smart received after he shoved a fan in the final seconds of a loss at Texas Tech, and the question of whether or not he regretted returning to school was sure to come up at the NBA Draft Scouting Combine in Chicago. Yet according to Andrew Seligman of the Associated Press, Smart has no regrets and instead looks at his experience as one that will help him moving forward.

“Everything that happened this season, I wouldn’t change it for a thing,” Smart said Friday at the NBA draft combine. “It helped me. It got me ready for the NBA and things that come in the NBA.”

In 2013-14 Smart averaged 18.0 points, 5.9 rebounds and 4.8 assists per game, shooting 42.2% from the field and 29.9% from beyond the arc. While Smart’s percentages improved by a small amount from his freshman season, there are still questions regarding his ability to be a consistent perimeter shooter.

And given the issues that weren’t seen in the box score, it’s understandable if some of his time spent talking with NBA team executives includes questions regarding his handling of adversity. Smart stated in the story that it isn’t something he’s going to shy away from, choosing instead to answer those questions directly, and that’s the best approach.

Marcus Smart officially declares for 2014 NBA Draft per report

Marcus Smart
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Oklahoma State sophomore guard Marcus Smart returned for his sophomore season amid a lot of fanfare along with senior wing Markel Brown and junior wing Le’Bryan Nash last spring. Now the 6-foot-4 Smart will go pro, according to a report in the Oklahoman. The sophomore will move to Los Angeles to train later this week, according to the story.

“I’ve told my teammates and my coaching staff, this year was my last year here and I am declaring for the NBA Draft,” Smart said in the John Helsey story. “I have picked an agent, with the Wasserman Group, a great group of guys.

“Ready to rock and roll. I’m getting ready for the NBA Draft and I’m ready to start training.”

Smart averaged 18 points, 5.9 rebounds, 4.8 assists and 2.9 steals per game in an up-and-down year that included a losing streak, a fan shoving incident and a return to the NCAA Tournament before falling to Gonzaga in the Round of 64.

“I had a great season here at Oklahoma State,” Smart said in the story. “It’s weird, because I didn’t go to the NBA Draft last year, I chose to come back – which I do not regret at all. A lot of people say I made the wrong decision. But who are they to tell me what I should have done? It’s me, not them.

“I believe I made the right decision. I get to do what I love to do.”

Smart is a likely lottery pick in the 2014 NBA Draft. Last year, some viewed Smart as a potential No. 1 pick candidate before he returned to school and played against a strong group of freshmen that saw his stock slip a little bit.