Tag: Keno Davis

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Central Michigan lands former Youngstown State guard

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With first team All-MAC guard Chris Fowler due to be a senior next season, accounting for his eventual departure is something that Central Michigan head coach Keno Davis and his staff needed to do. They took a significant step in the right direction Sunday by way of the transfer market, as former Youngstown State guard Marcus Keene will join the CMU program according to Mark Snyder of the Detroit Free-Press.

Keene was Youngstown State’s leading scorer in 2014-15, averaging 15.6 points per game and shooting 44.9 percent from the field and 41.9 percent from beyond the arc. Keene will have to sit out the 2015-16 season per NCAA transfer rules, and he’ll have two seasons of eligibility remaining.

In speaking with Snyder, Keene noted that getting to see CMU up close (the two teams met during the regular season) helped him during the process of deciding where he’d transfer to.

“They play a very up-tempo style of play – that’s my style of play, especially for my size, I’ve got to get up the floor,” said Keene, just 5-foot-11, 160 pounds. “When we played them this year and seen the way they played and went up there for a visit, they showed me how I could fit into their system.”

This situation works out well for Central Michigan, as Keene can spend the upcoming year competing against Fowler and the other guards in practice while also learning a new system. In theory, that should have him prepared to take over in 2016-17. Based upon his numbers at Youngstown State, Keene has the talent needed to hit the ground running when he’s able to suit up.

Duke Mondy making most of chance at Oakland

Duke Mondy
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The college career of Oakland guard Duke Mondy hasn’t been an easy one.

Mondy, who hails from Grand Rapids, MI, was recruited to Providence by then head coach Keno Davis. He spent his freshman and sophomore seasons with the Friars, but was in and out of disciplinary trouble there. Mondy was benched for the final four games of the 2010-11 season due to a “coach’s decision,” which ultimately led to his transfer to Oakland.

After sitting out the 2011-12 season due to NCAA transfer rules, Mondy was an immediate impact player for the Golden Grizzlies a season ago. He was third on the team in scoring, and led in assists at 5.1 per game. Perhaps his biggest impact on the floor, however, was on the defensive end where he averaged 3.0 steals per game. This year, he has upped that average to a remarkable 4.0 per game — no played has finished above four steals per game since 2002.

Mondy told Noah Trister of Kentucky.com: “I kind of put myself — if I was a player, at each position, what would I do?” Mondy said. “Like, if I was the center, what would I do? Would I kick it out? Or if I was the point guard, would I penetrate and try to kick?”

There’s no question he has a knack for the ball, but he also has a nose for trouble.

If you recognize Mondy’s name, that’s most likely due to an off-the-court incident earlier this season when Oakland was on the road in California. Mondy and teammate Dante Williams were arrested based on a woman’s sexual assault complaint. Authorities in California did not proceed with formal criminal charges, but a bad taste was still left in Oakland head coach Greg Kampe’s mouth.

Said Kampe:

“I have a real problem with what happened in California, morally, but I didn’t grow up on the streets, or how he grew up. The compass that I have inside of me and the compass that Duke has inside of him aren’t the same. … Duke is a good young man. We’ve just got to work on his compass.”

Kampe has provided Mondy with chances to redeem himself, both after his issues at Providence and most recent one in California. The chances have paid dividends on the floor for Oakland. Kampe explained what an impact Mondy has had:

I’ve never seen anything like it. We knew it when we got him. The sit-out year, he just took the ball from us in practice all the time. Early on, it caused us as many problems as it helped us, because he’s gambling and putting us in a bad situation, and that’ll happen now and then. But you have to live with that if you want the five run-outs that you’re going to get in a game.

Oakland played a brutal schedule in the non-conference, and are out to a less than stellar 5-11 record as a result, but are looking to get on track during Horizon League play, where they are competing in their first season after coming over from the Summit League.

Like many coaches, Kampe is having a profound affect on Mondy off the court. Mondy said: “He’s going to tell me straight, how it is. He’s not going to sugar coat anything. He’s been hard on me. He’s been helping me a lot, changing my life around.”

While Kampe is helping Mondy to turn things around, Mondy is still focusing on creating headaches on the floor for the opposition, and he’s doing a damn good job at that.

Ray Giacoletti has high hopes for Drake basketball

Ray Giacoletti
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Ray Giacoletti is used to winning.

In his previous three head coaching jobs — North Dakota State, Eastern Washington, and Utah — he posted winning records at each school.

As an assistant on Mark Few’s at Gonzaga from 2007 – 2013, he won 20+ games and advanced to the NCAA Tournament in each year.

Now, as he embarks on his first year on the job at Drake, Giacoletti hopes to transform the program into the next Gonzaga. Ambitious? Perhaps. But, he ostensibly knows what it takes to win and have success at smaller schools.

It’s more than just Gonzaga, though. Giacoletti has seen what Butler and Davidson have accomplished in recent years, and believes Drake — as an institution — is capable of finding that success.

He told The Associated Press during the team’s media day:

“Maybe 10 years ago people didn’t believe you could do both,” he said Tuesday during the team’s media day. “You can do both. There’s enough people out there that have proved it. That’s something Drake needs to be, in the same sentence with Butler, Davidson and Gonzaga. That would be our hope and vision.”

Giacoletti understands a program cannot be transformed overnight: it takes an institution that is committed to success, a rabid fan-base behind the program, a good head coach, and strong recruiting — all traits of Gonzaga’s program.

He said: “Gonzaga’s been playing basketball for over 100 years. It’s the last 15 years that are prevalent. Before that, one thing rings out: John Stockton. That’s the only thing you can think of for that basketball program before 15 years ago.”

For the better part of 40 years, Drake has been stuck in neutral; many 14-18 wins seasons, but never truly becoming a fixture in the college basketball landscape. Aside from the 2007-08 season under Keno Davis where the Bulldogs went 28-5 earning a No. 5 seed in the NCAA Tournament — a truly magical year that can aptly be categorized as a fluke considering their record in years before and after that season — Drake hasn’t been to the NCAA Tournament since 1971.

To make a parallel between Gonzaga and Drake, prior to Mark Few taking over as head coach in 1999, Gonzaga went to a mere two NCAA Tournaments in program history. Since then, 14 straight years — they have gone to the NCAA Tournament every season Few has been head coach.

Probably unreasonable to expect Giacoletti to have that kind of success right away, especially seeing as Few was a long time assistant with Gonzaga and knew the program inside and out, but it does demonstrate building a program is possible when the right people are in place and the school is committed.