Tag: Jordan Adams


UCLA’s Jordan Adams changes mind, will enter 2014 NBA Draft

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Nine days after announcing that he would return to UCLA for his junior season, guard Jordan Adams had a change of heart. According to Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports, Adams has decided to enter the 2014 NBA Draft. The decision falls on the day of the NBA’s early entry deadline.

Adams, who averaged 17.4 points per game and earned first team All Pac-12 honors, was projected to be a late-first round selection by Draft Express before announcing that he would return to school. He’s the third Bruin to enter the NBA Draft this offseason, with point guard Kyle Anderson and shooting guard Zach LaVine doing so shortly after the end of UCLA’s season.

And with those three departures and the graduation of forwards David and Travis Wear, head coach Steve Alford has a lot of production to replace in 2014-15. UCLA’s leading returning scorer will be Norman Powell, who early this month was thought by some to be considering the possibility of turning pro as well. Powell averaged 11.4 points per game and was a much-improved offensive player in his first season playing for Alford.

Also returning is rising sophomore guard Bryce Alford, who averaged 8.0 points and 2.8 assists per game as one of the first two players off the bench (LaVine being the other). UCLA adds a four-member recruiting class led by forward Kevon Looney and center Thomas Welch, and they’ll also have guard Isaac Hamilton. Hamilton was forced to sit out all of last season his appeal to be released from the National Letter of Intent he signed to attend UTEP was denied.

But even with the talent due to arrive on campus, the loss of Adams hurts for a team that was thought to be one of Arizona’s biggest challengers in the Pac-12 with the high-scoring guard on board.

Defensive struggles cost No. 4 UCLA against No. 1 Florida

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Entering their game against No. 1 Florida, the general feeling was that No. 4 UCLA had the offensive weapons needed to challenge the NCAA tournament’s top overall seed. With an uncommon matchup at the point in the form of Kyle Anderson and guards Jordan Adams and Norman Powell both playing well, the Bruins are a difficult team more many opponents to slow down.

However the more important question was whether or not UCLA would have the tools needed to defend Florida, and the answer in their 79-68 loss was an emphatic “no.”

After failing to shoot 40% from the field in their first two NCAA tournament games Florida made 50% of its shots against UCLA, shooting 21-for-37 inside of the arc. And in the second half Florida shot 59.3% from the field, making 13 of its 19 two-point attempts. On the season UCLA’s opponents made 48.6% of their two-point attempts, but the Bruins were worse against a Florida team that continuously found the open areas as the game progressed.

MORE: Michael Frazier II rebounds from tough opening weekend

Part of that had to do with Michael Frazier II ending his shooting slump, thus providing Florida with the balance needed to enjoy better spacing. But whether it was in zone or man-to-man, UCLA simply could not keep the Gators from finding quality two-point looks. Thanks to their ability to force turnovers UCLA put together solid defensive efficiency numbers this season, but when unable to force those mistakes some of the Bruins’ deficiencies as individual defenders can be exposed.

Florida accounted for 22 assists and 12 turnovers Thursday night, a far cry from the 25 assists and 24 turnovers that Tulsa and Stephen F. Austin combined for against the Bruins last weekend in San Diego. UCLA scored 19 points off of those Gator turnovers, which kept them within striking distance for much of the evening.

But a 10-0 second-half run spearheaded by Scottie Wilbekin, who played a role in eight of those points, provided Billy Donovan’s team with the cushion needed to wrap up a fourth consecutive Elite Eight appearance.

UCLA didn’t have its best night offensively, shooting 42.2% from the field and 3-for-18 from beyond the arc, but for them to not score as efficiently as they did a week ago was to be expected given Florida’s defensive ability. With this being the case the Bruins needed to consistently string together stops in the half court, but they were unable to do so.

Jordan Adams, supporting cast lead No. 4 UCLA past No. 13 Tulsa

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After winning the Pac-12 tournament title, South Region No. 4 UCLA entered the NCAA tournament with hopes of making a deep run. The debut in San Diego wasn’t the most consistent, but the Bruins finished the game on a 17-2 run as they put away No. 13 Tulsa by the final score of 76-59. Led by Jordan Adams, who finished the game with 21 points and eight rebounds, UCLA shot 46% from the field on the night and assisted on 17 of their 29 made baskets.

The Bruins took care of business despite an off night from sophomore guard Kyle Anderson, who committed five turnovers and shot just 3-for-11 from the field. Anderson did contribute in other areas, as he accounted for six rebounds, six assists and four steals to go along with his eight points. But what stood out for UCLA was the fact that multiple players (besides Adams) stepped forward against Tulsa.

Norman Powell, whose emphatic dunk with 1:19 sealed the game, scored 15 points and was also the primary defender assigned to James Woodard, Tulsa’s leading scorer. Averaging 15.7 points per game on the season, Woodard finished the game with 11 points on 3-for-11 shooting. UCLA also received solid contributions from forwards Tony Parker and Travis Wear, with the former supplying 11 points and six rebounds off the bench and the latter scoring ten points on 5-for-5 shooting.

Given the skill level of both Adams and Anderson it’s a safe bet that those two will be productive on most nights. But for UCLA to make the most of its NCAA tournament experience, it can’t be a two-man show. Powell’s been much improved this season, and freshman guards Bryce Alford and Zach LaVine are both talented enough to contribute as well. If the UCLA supporting cast can show up consistently, the Bruins have a greater chance of being successful.

Next up for UCLA is No. 12 Stephen F. Austin, which eliminated No. 5 VCU in the first game of the night session. That will be a difficult matchup regardless of the seeding, with the Lumberjacks having won 29 straight games on the strength of a balanced offensive attack and a stout half-court defense. UCLA will certainly need a more productive Anderson, but Friday’s performance served as a reminder that there are others capable of helping the stars carry the load when needed.