James Young

Deonte Burton

The 22 best dunks from college basketball in 2014

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1. Nevada’s Deonte Burton dunks on Boise State — March 6

Deonte Burton spoiled college basketball fans over the years, and this one from March 6 might have been his best. Seriously, look where he takes off from.

2. James Young, Kentucky vs. UConn in the 2014 national championship game — Apr. 7

The national championship game ended with UConn winning its second title in four years, but James Young left his mark midway through the second half. Amida Brimah gets a lot of his arm, and the 6-foot-7 Young was still able to finish.

3. Michael Qualls’ buzzer-beating dunk in Arkansas’ overtime win over Kentucky — Jan. 14

The Razorbacks has two wins over ranked opponents during the 2013-14 season, both of which came against Kentucky. Arkansas left Michael Qualls alone on the baseline with time winding down in overtime. When you don’t box out one of the best dunkers in the country, this is what happens.

4. Buffalo’s Justin Moss slams over 7-foot Willie Cauley-Stein — Nov. 16

Apologies, Big Blue Nation. Kentucky is one the wrong end of another memorable dunk. Willie Cauley-Stein is arguably the best defensive player in the country. Buffalo’s Justin Moss didn’t care. The Bulls gave the Wildcats a scare before top-ranked Kentucky ran away with a 19-point win.

5. Demetrius Jackson dunks over Purdue big man a foot taller than him — Dec. 20

Notre Dame guard Demetrius Jackson is 6-foot-1. Purdue freshman center Isaac Haas is 7-feet tall. David prevailed over Goliath with a one-handed jam in a blowout win for the Fighting Irish.

6. High Point’s John Brown throws down reverse alley-oop with ease — Jan. 26

If you are unfamiliar with John Brown, go ahead and look him up on the site. He’s been a stable part of our “Posterization” series. What makes this dunk so impressive is how easy it looks for Brown.

7. Tekele Cotton’s perfect posterization in Wichita State’s perfect regular season — Jan. 22

Wichita State’s big three was Cleanthony Early, Ron Baker and Fred VanVleet during last season’s 34-0 regular season. Tekele Cotton could not be forgotten, especially with plays like this.

8. Aaron Gordon defies gravity with a baseline out-of-bounds dunk — Feb. 24

For second there, I really thought Aaron Gordon wasn’t going to come down.

9. Bernard Thompson proves why it’s called Dunk City — March 9

Florida Gulf Coast was branded “Dunk City” during its Sweet 16 run in 2013. That carried over to the following season thanks to Bernard Thompson. This was one of two dunks in a week-span for the star shooting guard. He had this tip slam against Northern Kentucky earlier that week.

10. Dunk Champ Marcus Lewis slams on Kansas in NCAA tournament — March 22

What’s a list of 2014 dunks without college basketball dunk champ Marcus Lewis? Also, this is a pretty good list if this barely cracks the top 10.

A dozen more of the best dunks from 2014:

2014 NBA Draft Preview: Top Ten Players in five years?

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source: AP

The NBA Draft is on June 26th, meaning that there are less than two weeks until the next crop of potential NBA all-stars find out where they will be headed to begin their professional basketball careers. Over the course of the next few days, we will be using the expertise that we’ve gained from watching far too much college basketball to give you our insights on some of these prospects.

Today, we take a guess at who from this draft will be the ten best NBA players five years from now:

RELATEDUnderrated Prospects | Overrated Prospects | 2014 NBA Draft Preview

1. Andrew Wiggins, Kansas

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 1), Chad Ford (No. 2)
  • Raphielle Johnson: “I’ll take Wiggins over any other player in the pool. The offensive skills are there, and removing Embiid he’s the prospect best equipped to actually defend his position.”
  • Rob Dauster: “Wiggins had a very, very good season that was lambasted because he wasn’t Kevin Durant or Michael Beasley. Consistent effort and a ‘killer’ mindset are red flags, but he already carries himself like a pro: he knows what nights he can take off and what nights he needs to take over.”
  • Scott Phillips: “Wiggins can defend up to four positions at a high level, has elite open-floor ability and was underrated as a jump shooter last year, despite living under a microscope in Lawrence. His ceiling is absurd.”

2. Jabari Parker, Duke

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 2), Chad Ford (No. 1)
  • RJ: “Offensively his skill set is second to none, and that will make him an impact player. Defensively, the hope has to be that he ends up on a team that can cover for his deficiencies as he learns the ropes and (hopefully) improves in that area.”
  • SP: “Your 2015 NBA Rookie of the Year. Parker is one of the most NBA-ready scorers the drafthas seen in the last few years but he still has to improve on the defensive end to really be among the game’s elite.”
  • RD: “He can score like no one else in this draft. He was benched as a defensive liability against Mercer.”

3. Julius Randle, Kentucky

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 7), Chad Ford (No. 7)
  • Terrence Payne: “If his foot stays healthy, he should be a productive forward, who can develop his skillset around his physical style of play.”
  • RD: “Randle seems assured of having a long, productive career, but I’m not sure he’s a franchise-changing talent like a Wiggins or Parker can be. He’s somewhere between the next Zach Randolph and the next David Lee.”
source: Getty Images
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4. Joel Embiid, Kansas

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 4), Chad Ford (No. 6)
  • RD: “The concerns with Embiid’s health are obvious, which is why he ended up at fourth on this list despite being arguably the best prospect in a loaded draft class. He’s got foot and back issues, which is not a good thing for a big man, but Yao Ming made eight all-star teams with foot issues. Michael Jordan broke his foot. Zydrunas Ilgauskas had a long, productive career after breaking his foot. It’s risky, but Embiid’s career isn’t over just yet.”
  • SP: “You have to remember that Embiid is still rather new to the game and the learning curve is incredibly steep in the NBA. It could take much longer than five years to learn how good Embiid really is. And what if Embiid is drafted by a franchise that doesn’t do a good job of developing big men, or get him a point guard that can get him the ball?”

5. Dante Exum, Australia

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 3), Chad Ford (No. 3)
  • SP: “The only player on this list I’ve never seen extensively in-person, I did get a chance to see Exum take part in the Combine drills and he’s a long and fluid guard who has a ton of upside. He immediately passes the ‘look test’. How Exum acclimates to the American game could determine how quickly he ascends in the league.”
  • RD: “Exum is talented. He’s also untested. We’ve yet to see him spend a full season going up against elite competition.”

6. Noah Vonleh, Indiana

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 5), Chad Ford (No. 4)
  • SP: “I might be a tad high on Vonleh, but his upside is just so tantalizing, given his size, skill level and age. Vonleh worked hard enough to add 25 pounds of muscle in one summer at Indiana and his jumper has improved immensely as well, to the point where he could be a pick-and-pop or maybe even a catch-and-shoot option in the NBA.”
  • RD: “Full disclosure: I had Vonleh as No. 3 on my list. I think he’s a perennial all-star.”

7. Aaron Gordon, Arizona

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 10), Chad Ford (No. 5)
  • TP: “Will be a solid team player given his defensive abilities. Hard to believe he wouldn’t improve his offensive skills in that span, as well.”
  • SP: “I really don’t get why teams aren’t higher on Aaron Gordon? He’s a tremendous athlete and defender, ultra competitive and he doesn’t try to do too much at this point with the ball in his hands. His development on the offensive end will be a big key in how good he’ll really be.”

8. Nik Stauskas, Michigan

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 9), Chad Ford (No. 10)
  • RJ: “The gains Stauskas made from his freshman to sophomore year with regards to his skill set, physical build and athleticism bode well for his future in the NBA.”
  • SP: “His shooting percentages are ridiculous, he’s improved each of the last two years and he’s deceptive as a ball handler in pick-and-roll situations. The body fat percentage and lack of lateral quickness is a bit of a concern on the defensive end, but you know what you’re getting out of Stauskas as an offensive player and there’s a lot to like.”

9. James Young, Kentucky

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 17), Chad Ford (No. 14)
  • RD: “He can score, he’s a better shooter than he showed last season, and he’s a lefty, which always seems to give people problems. The biggest issue is whether he’ll learn to defend at the next level.”
  • SP: “Young is so smooth and so skilled on the wing that it’s hard for me to believe that his shooting percentages will remain as low as they were at Kentucky. Again, as with Julius Randle, Young could benefit from playing around teammates that aren’t so ball-dominant and playing with guards that can put him in a better position to score.”
  • RJ: “He was Kentucky’s best player in the national title game, and his ability to score from the perimeter and put the ball on the deck will help with the transition.”

10. Elfrid Payton, Louisiana-Lafayette

  • ProjectionsDraft Express (No. 12), Chad Ford (No. 12)
  • RD: “The NBA is infatuated with big, athletic, aggressive guards, and that’s precisely what Payton can do. He’s got the length and quickness to be a defensive menace at the next level as well. Now he just needs to learn how to shoot.”
  • TP: “I think this is going to be the mid-first round pick who has the greatest impact. He’s still very young for being a college junior. Has the tools to be a good on both ends of the floor, and that’s without a consistent 3-point shot.”

Also receiving votes: Marcus Smart (Oklahoma State), Gary Harris, (Michigan State), Tyler Ennis (Syracuse), Doug McDermott (Creighton)

POSTERIZED: James Young with one of the best dunks of the year on UConn

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James Young just destroyed UConn with a dunk in traffic. You don’t let him attack with his left hand!

(H/T: @thenbacentral)

POSTERIZED: James Young skies high for Andrew Harrison’s ally-oop (VIDEO)

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Kentucky’s James Young had faded to the corner, but when Andrew Harrison drove into the paint, the talented wing threw his hand up the air, signalling for a lob from his fellow freshman ‘Cat. The result? A smooth ally-oop that left UK’s basket shaking.

No. 11 Kentucky bounces back, surviving on the road against Missouri

Marcus Lee
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Julius Randle finished with 18 points, nine boards, three assists and three steals and Kentucky’s three perimeter players — the Harrison twins and James Young — combined for 55 points, seven assists and just three turnovers as No. 11 Kentucky picked up a huge win on Saturday, knocking off Missouri on the road, 84-79.

The first half was precisely the kind of performance that Kentucky fans wanted to see out of the Wildcats. They played hard, they played together, they defended, they made the extra pass, they pounded the ball into Randle. When Dominique Hawkins hit the floor in the first half, the entire team sprinted over to help him up.

Tuesday’s loss at LSU looked like Kentucky was going through a walk-through at a shootaround. Saturday’s performance brought a completely different level of energy. And that, in the end, may be the key to Kentucky’s season.

There is simply no questioning the talent level on this roster, even if you are in the camp that believes that Aaron and Andrew Harrison are overrated and even if Willie Cauley-Stein and Alex Poythress continue to put together an up-and-down career. On paper, the Wildcats can compete with anyone in the country. On the court, that’s not necessarily the case, and the cause often boils down to effort and intensity.

This Kentucky team, at times, can has a distinct lack of toughness, both mentally and physically. That wasn’t the case on Saturday.

I’ll give you an example: at one point in the second half, the Wildcats were up 49-33. But Jabari Brown and Jordan Clark both got into a rhythm in the second half, routinely dissecting the Kentucky defense off the dribble. Brown finished with 33 points. Clarkson had 28. They put on a show, one that will once again raise serious question marks about Kentucky’s perimeter defense.

With two minutes left, Brown hit a 26-foot three and drew a foul on a questionable call. The ensuing free throw cut the Kentucky lead to 78-75. The Wildcats were on the verge of an epic collapse in a incredibly important game on the road. For a team that has yet to prove capable of thriving in situations like that, this was concerning.

But Kentucky executed in the final three possession, getting a bucket each time they had the ball, and much of the credit should be given to Andrew Harrison. He made the plays that a point guard is supposed to make, finishing with 14 points, four assists and just a single turnover. He made the right decisions and got the ball to the right people.

Kentucky played as well as they can play for the first 25 minutes on Saturday. They survived blowing a lead against a good team on the road.

No matter how you slice it, this was a promising performance from Kentucky.

No. 11 Kentucky needs leaders to emerge at Missouri

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After winning three straight games, No. 11 Kentucky didn’t put its best foot forward, so to speak, in their 87-82 loss at LSU on Tuesday night. Defensively the effort wasn’t where it needed to be, with LSU shooting nearly 51% from the field and Johnny O’Bryant III torching the Wildcat big men for 29 points to go along with nine rebounds. Offensively the Wildcats forced shots and didn’t share the basketball as much as they should have, and those factors resulted in the team’s second conference defeat.

The effort issues don’t go for every player who saw time on Tuesday, with Dakari Johnson and James Young being two of the exceptions on Tuesday. And if Kentucky is to win at Missouri on Saturday, there cannot be any questions regarding the team’s effort or temperament.

For some teams a players-only meeting is the proper tonic, with players airing their grievances and committing to do whatever it takes to better the team. And that’s the path the Wildcats reportedly took in the aftermath of their loss to LSU, with sophomore Alex Poythress organizing the meeting.

That’s a move to be applauded by the head coach, right? Not if you ask Calipari, who voiced his opinion on the subject on Friday according to Kyle Tucker of the Louisville Courier-Journal.

On the players-only meeting and him typically not being impressed with those: “Don’t want to know. Don’t want to know, don’t care. Let’s play. This all is about what we do on the court, preparing to go to war, understanding that the other team is excited to play you. That’s all what this comes down to.”

On if it’s significant that Alex Poythress called the meeting: “You’re telling me stuff that I don’t know because I don’t care to know. All I want to see is that we’re prepared to play and that we’re understanding that the other team is absolutely excited to play you, and you have to be excited and energetic and passionate and that’s how you have to play basketball.”

During his press conference Calipari also noted that the players are the ones who need to step up and lead the team, something many have been waiting for with this current group. And that goes a long way towards solving problems on the court, as the presence of a leader (or leaders) usually ensures that there’s a collective effort to make things right instead of every man pulling in his own direction.

There will still be growing pains for this group regardless of the collection of individual talent, due in large part to the age of the players on the team. Outside of senior Jarrod Polson the entire rotation consists of underclassmen, and that can be an issue for some teams.

Kentucky needs to figure out its leadership issue, with Saturday’s road game being the first opportunity for players to step up in a hostile environment. NCAA tournament games may be played on neutral floors, but the magnitude of the moment makes leadership critical. And whether or not leaders emerge will determine just how far the Wildcats go.