Jake Layman

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Jake Layman to return to Maryland, makes Terps a powerhouse


Maryland announced on Thursday that Jake Layman will be returning to school for his senior season.

“Jake has been an outstanding member of our program for the last three years,” Turgeon said. “He is a great teammate, very coachable and has been extremely loyal to Maryland Basketball. Jake’s growth both on and off the court has been exciting to watch and his leadership is going to be vital to our success next season.”

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Layman averaged 12.5 points and 5.8 boards as a junior for the Terps. The 6-foot-8 wing has the range and athletic ability to intrigue NBA scouts; he’s a potential first round pick. His return, combined with the return of Melo Trimble, Dion Wiley and Jared Nickens along with the addition of Diamond Stone and Robert Carter, has the Terps looking like a real national title contender.

“I would like to thank Coach Turgeon for his guidance during this process,” Layman said in the release. “Maryland is my home and we had great success this year. There is so much to look forward to next season and I’m excited to be a part of it.”

No. 17 Maryland moves to 11-1 with win at Oklahoma State

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With multiple teams taking unexpected losses in non-conference play, many still have questions as to who the second-best team in the Big Ten may be. No. 12 Ohio State, whose only losses have come against No. 4 Louisville and No. 24 North Carolina, has an argument but so does No. 17 Maryland. Mark Turgeon’s Terrapins are off to an 11-1 start, with their most recent result being a 73-64 win at Oklahoma State on Sunday.

The game in Stillwater was Maryland’s first true road game, but they also have a neutral-court win over No. 13 Iowa State on their resume. Also of note is the fact that Maryland’s won six of the seven games they’ve played without leading scorer Dez Wells, who remains sidelined with a fractured right wrist.

Others have stepped forward in Wells’ absence, including a freshman point guard in Melo Trimble who ranks among the best newcomers in college basketball.

Sunday afternoon it was forward Jake Layman who led the way offensively, scoring a game-high 21 points on 7-for-12 shooting while also grabbing 11 rebounds. On the season Layman’s averaging 15.8 points per game, and his numbers across the board have been an improvement over what he produced as a sophomore. Layman’s become both more consistent and more efficient, as evidenced by his field goal percentage jumping from 40.1% in 2013-14 to 53.1% through 12 games in 2014-15.

Joining Layman in double figures were freshmen Melo Trimble (15 points, four assists) and Jared Nickens (11), and North Carolina A&T transfer grabbed ten rebounds. Trimble finished Sunday’s game with as many turnovers (four) as assists, but overall he’s been the addition many expected him to be upon his commitment to Maryland.

Trimble, currently averaging 15.8 points and 3.1 assists per game, gives Maryland a player at the point who opposing teams have to account for as both a scorer and a distributor and the Terps didn’t have that last year. Trimble will only get better with experience, and along with Ohio State’s D’Angelo Russell he’s been the best freshman in the Big Ten.

As a team Maryland hit ten three-pointers against the Cowboys, and they did a better job of converting turnovers into points than Oklahoma State did. Maryland scored 21 points off of 11 Oklahoma State turnovers, and the plus-8 in that particular category played an important role in the outcome. As Big Ten play approaches Maryland will only get better, with Evan Smotrycz (eight points) getting more comfortable after missing time for health reasons, Wells returning to the rotation, and the freshmen improving with more game action under their belts.

At this point, any conversations about the Big Ten race have to include Mark Turgeon’s Terrapins. They’ve earned that through the first 12 games of the season.

Broken bone in left hand to sideline Maryland’s Jake Layman 4-6 weeks

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After averaging 5.5 points and 3.2 rebounds per game as a freshman in 2012-13, Maryland guard/forward Jake Layman developed into one of the most improved players in the ACC. Last season Layman averaged 11.7 points and 5.0 rebounds per contest, ranking third on the team in both scoring and rebounding. Now that the Terrapins are a member of the Big Ten, Layman’s progression is one key for a program looking to reach the NCAA tournament for the first time in the Mark Turgeon era.

Unfortunately for Layman and the Terps his summer has hit a bump in the road, with it being first reported by InsideMDSports.com that he broke a bone in his left (non-shooting) hand earlier this month. The news was later confirmed by Daniel Martin of CSNBaltimore.com.

Layman shot 40.1% from the field and 36.5% from three last season, with his three-point percentage being second-best amongst Maryland’s returnees (Evan Smotrycz). The Terrapins, which lost Seth Allen and Roddy Peters (transfers), have added four perimeter players capable of helping them in the perimeter shooting department this season.

Graduate transfer Richaud Pack has the most experience of those four, with Jared Nickens, Romelo Trimble and Dion Wiley part of a highly-regarded freshman class.

Layman and leading scorer Dez Wells are Maryland’s most experienced returnees on the perimeter, and it goes without saying that their performances will be key as the Terrapins look to navigate a new conference. The “good” news is that Layman’s injury is on his non-shooting hand, but the fact that he’ll still have to miss anywhere from four to six weeks doesn’t help matters when it comes to his improving during the summer.

College Basketball Talk’s Top 20 Most Improved Players

Ron Baker


Prior to the season, every pundit for every outlet across the country will put together his or her list of players with the potential to have a breakout season.

Which freshmen will have big sophomore seasons? Which seniors will finally get the chance to step into a starring role? What transfers spent their redshirt year transforming their body and perfecting their weaknesses? 

Sometimes, we’re spot on. Other times, we completely whiff. One month into the season, here is a look at this year’s Breakout Stars:


J.J. Avila, Colorado State: Avila, a transfer from Navy, has been the biggest reason that the Rams haven’t dropped off much this season. He’s averaging 19.5 points and 6.3 boards. Jon Octeus and Daniel Bejarano also could be listed here.

Cameron Bairstow, New Mexico: A solid role player for three years, Bairstow has turned into one of the nation’s best big men. He’s averaging 19.8 points, 7.1 boards and 2.8 assists.

Ron Baker, Wichita State: Ron Baker was a key role player for the Shockers last season. He’s turned into arguably their best player this year, a 6-foot-4 combo-guard averaging 15.3 points, 4.6 boards and 3.6 assists. Scouts that go to watch Cleanthony Early leave raving about Baker.

Cameron Clark and Buddy Hield, Oklahoma: Many predicted Buddy Hield to develop into a star this season. He has, but the bigger surprise has been Clark. A top 30 recruit coming out of high school, Clark has turned into an all-Big 12 caliber wing.

Trevor Cooney, Syracuse: Amazing what a bit of confidence will do. Cooney’s averaging 15.3 points, shooting 48.4% from three and averaging 2.8 steals this season after playing last year as a liability.

Kellen Dunham, Butler: Dunham is doing his best to make Butler fans forget about Rotnei Clarke (and Ro Jones and Brad Stevens), averaging 19.1 points and shooting 46.4% from three while taking more than seven-per-game.

Perry Ellis, Kansas: Ellis has been the most consistent offensive option for Kansas this season, leading the team at 14.5 points while grabbing 6.8 boards per game.

source:  Yogi Ferrell, Indiana: Ferrell has become the leader that he needs to be for the Hoosiers to be competitive this season, averaging 17.0 points and 4.0 assists. His numbers take a bit of a hit because of the lack of scorers that Indiana has.

Shaq Goodwin, Memphis: On a team with a stable of perimeter weapons, Goodwin’s emergence has a presence on the block is key for the Tigers. He’s averaging 13.1 points and 6.1 boards as a sophomore this season.

Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin: It happens every year. Bo Ryan somehow manages to turn a guy that’s spent a couple years as a big stiff into an all-Big Ten caliber post with three-point range. Kaminsky is averaging 14.6 points, 5.9 boards, 2.1 blocks and shooting 41.1% from three. He went for 43 points in a game earlier this year.

Cady Lalanne, UMass: Lalanne is finally living up to his talent this season, averaging 15.0 points and 10.4 boards as the Minutemen’s best interior presence. His emergence is a major reason why UMass will compete for the Atlantic 10 title.

Jake Layman, Maryland: Layman’s improvement will get lost in the shuffle in Maryland keeps sputtering, but he’s a 6-foot-8 wing that’s averaging 14.4 points and shooting 44.4% from three.

Caris LeVert and Nik Stauskas, Michigan: LeVert will get a lot of attention, going from a guy that saw limited minutes to a wing that averages 13.9 points. But Stauskas has made the real jump. He was a spot-up shooter last year. He’s one of the 20 best all-around offensive weapons in college basketball this season.

Codi Miller-McIntyre, Wake Forest: Miller-McIntyre still isn’t as consistent as he’d like to be from the perimeter, but it’s hard to nitpick a kid averaging 17.9 points, 4.4 assists and just 1.5 turnovers.

Marcus Paige, North Carolina: As good as North Carolina’s big men have been in wins over Louisville and Michigan State, it’s been Paige’s emergence as a star — 18.8 ppg, 4.5 apg, 39.2% 3PT — that has kept the Tar Heels afloat without P.J. Hairston.

Lamar Patterson, Pitt: Pitt will compete for the ACC title this year, and Patterson’s improvement in the biggest reason why. He’s averaging 16.2 points, 5.o boards, 5.1 assists and 1.8 steals this year.

Casey Prather, Florida: After three seasons of being a defensive stopper and a glue guy, Prather has turned into a big-time scorer this season, averaging 19.1 points. Yeah, I don’t get it either.

Xavier Thames, San Diego State: No Jamaal Franklin? No Chase Tapley? No problem. Thames has taken over the role of SDSU’s big-shot maker this year.

Other names considered: Devon Collier, Maurice Creek, Justin Jackson, Naz Long, Cameron Wright