JaKarr Sampson

Jakarr Sampson, Derrick Wilson

St. John’s sophomore JaKarr Sampson to enter NBA Draft


St. John’s sophomore forward JaKarr Sampson will enter the 2014 NBA Draft, according to a release from the school’s athletic department.

Sampson, a 6-foot-9 wing forward averaged 13.9 points and 6.4 rebounds per game in 66 games over two seasons for the Red Storm. The 2012-13 Big East Rookie of the Year shot 46 percent from the field during his career at St. John’s, but only has one career three-pointer.

“JaKarr will forego his final two years of eligibility and pursue his dream of playing in the NBA. We are grateful for JaKarr’s contributions to our St. John’s basketball program,” said Red Storm head coach Steve Lavin in the release. “In speaking with NBA general managers JaKarr is projected as a draft prospect with intriguing talent and upside.”

The 2012-13 Big East Rookie of the Year is not considered a strong prospect for the NBA at the moment. Draft Express doesn’t have Sampson listed among its two-round mock draft for the 2014 draft.

MOREThe entire list of players entering the 2014 NBA Draft

“It has been my lifelong dream to play in the NBA, and I am excited and ready to begin that journey. I am grateful to my teammates and coaches at St. John’s. I would like to thank Coach Lavin, our staff and my teammates for being there for me throughout my whole career at SJU. We have been through a lot together and I know everyone is excited for me,” said Sampson in the release. “Coach Lavin and my support group have helped me conduct research and the information gathered indicates that with hard work, I have a chance to improve my stock and play in the NBA next year. I will work hard and prove myself in every workout. I know I can impress upon GMs and coaches that I am ready be a contributor to a NBA team.”

Xavier frustrates St. John’s in crucial resume game

Chris Mack
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There hasn’t been a hotter team in Big East play since late January than St. John’s. Steve Lavin’s squad was both clicking on defense (forcing countless steals) and on offense (consistently converting from two-point range), and the team looked like an shoo-in for an NCAA tournament bid. However, it appears the Red Storm has reverted to the mean: after a loss to Villanova this weekend, Xavier (19-9, 9-7), thanks to the best game of forward Jalen Reynolds’ career, defeated the Johnnies, now 18-11 (and 8-8 in conference play).

The 6-foot-9 Reynolds was suspended by coach Chris Mack in late January, and missed two games while ‘dealing with responsibilities greater than basketball‘. Since he returned to the floor, Reynolds has been solid, but no one could have predicted his outburst tonight: the big scored 17 points and grabbed 15 rebounds, completely beasting SJU’s frontcourt and single-handedly dominating the Red Storm in the paint. Like the Villanova loss, though, St. John’s was within single-digits for most of the game, but could not find any sort of offensive rhythm: the team scored just .80 points per possession and converted 47 percent of their twos. In their first match-up, Xavier was content to pack the paint and let SJU try their luck from mid-range — the Red Storm has never met an 18 footer they didn’t want to take — and the Musketeers benefited again from this strategy. Phil Greene IV and D’Angelo Harrison shot a combined 2 for 16, and six of JaKarr Sampson’s 17 field goal attempts were mid-range misses.

This was an important game for both teams: St. John’s will now have to win out their remaining slate, which includes games against DePaul and Marquette, and reach at least the semifinals of the Big East tournament to get a bid for NCAAs (and even that prognostication might be too generous). What is more likely is that the Red Storm will crack the NIT field, a disappointing result for a team that faced such great expectations during the preseason. This win greatly boosted Xavier’s at-large chances: Mack’s squad likely still has to beat Seton Hall and split their upcoming Creighton and Villanova contests, but XU’s path to the postseason became a bit clearer.

11 threes, reserve Duje Dukan spark No. 21 Wisconsin to 86-75 win over St. John’s

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Wisconsin put five players in double figures and shot 11-23 from beyond the arc as they knocked off a talented and athletic St. John’s team, 86-75.

Josh Gasser led the way with 19 points, but it was the 16 points from Sam Dekker and 15 points from Ben Brust that really made the difference in this one.

The biggest concern with Wisconsin heading into the season was the fact that they will be playing the majority of this season with a three-guard lineup, and on Friday night, that didn’t appear to be an issue. The Badgers were able to spread the floor against the Johnnies, attacking gaps in their matchup-zone and creating open shot after open shot.

The Badgers are going to be a nightmare for teams with more traditional lineups to try and defend. Sam Dekker has the height of a power forward but the perimeter skills of an off-guard. He’s an all-american caliber talent, and asking a big man to try and stay with him on the perimeter is a tall task.

As has become the standard for Bo Ryan teams, they also managed to find scoring from a place where you absolutely wouldn’t expect it. On Friday, it was Duje Dukan, a redshirt junior that barely made a scouting report, who went off for 15 points. Dukan is a prototypical Badger big man, as he can step out and knock down a three, further spreading the floor.

The Johnnies got off to a tough start in this one, digging themselves a 33-15 hole. They were able to get the lead down to four in the second half, but the Badgers immediately responded with a pair of threes to push the lead back to ten, a spurt that looked like it demoralized St. John’s.

D’angelo Harrison and JaKarr Sampson both looked like all-Big East player, finishing with 48 points combined. But the rest of St. John’s lineup looked a bit lost. There’s a ton of talent on potential there, but it will be interesting to see if Lavin is able to tap into it. Granted, this was a tough matchup — in a game being played in South Dakota of all places — for this team, so I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt for now.

One thing to keep an eye on: St. John’s doesn’t really have a low-post scorer on their roster. Wisconsin doesn’t really have a big man that can defend on the block. It will be interesting to see what happens when the Badgers face a team with a real front court scorer.

2013-2014 Season Preview: The Top 20 Wing Forwards

Syracuse Orange forward C.J. Fair (R) drives to the net on Marquette Golden Eagles guard Trent Lockett during the first half in their East Regional NCAA men's basketball game in Washington
Andrew Wiggins (AP) and Jabari Parker (AP)

All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of our preview lists, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

Basketball has five positions, but the way that the sport has grown, particularly at the collegiate level, has produced hybrid players, unusual roster makeups and far too many teams with players that don’t fit into a typical positional category. Few teams actually field a traditional starting five, which is why CBT decided to make our positional rankings reflect that.

We will be ranking:

Wing forwards are players that we feel cannot be designated as a member of the back court yet do the majority of their damage away from the basket. A wing player in basketball is one that requires versatility if a player’s to be considered among the elite at the position. Whether they’re a high-level perimeter shooter or a slasher who’s best when attacking off the dribble, the ability to excel in multiple facets of the game is of high importance.

Here’s our list of the 20 best wings entering the 2013-14 season:

1. Andrew Wiggins (Kansas): The Huntington Prep product arrived in Lawrence amidst much fanfare, and whether or not he’s in the spot when the season ends will depend in large part on how he handles the attention. The skill and athleticism are most certainly there, with more than a few scouts pegging Wiggins as the top pick in the 2014 NBA Draft should he enter.

2. Jabari Parker (Duke): Parker was one of the most versatile players in the country coming out of Simeon High in Chicago, as he has the ability to score both inside and out. Given his talent Parker is one of two wings expected to lead the way for the Blue Devils as they look to account for the loss of their top three scorers from a season ago.

3. C.J. Fair (Syracuse): Even with the Orange playing their first season in the ACC, it was Fair who the coaches chose as their preseason ACC Player of the Year. As a junior, the southpaw from Baltimore posted averages of 14.5 points and 6.9 rebounds per game for a team that won 30 games and reached the Final Four for the first time in a decade.

source: Getty Images
Getty Images

4. Rodney Hood (Duke): Hood has yet to play a game in a Duke uniform as he transferred in from Mississippi State. But that season spent practicing is expected to pay dividends for Hood, who was an SEC All-Freshman Team selection in 2011-12 (10.3 ppg, 4.8 rpg, 2.0 apg). And he’s already a trusted leader for Mike Krzyzewski’s squad, as he’s been named a team captain for the upcoming season.

5. Glenn Robinson III (Michigan): The son of the “Big Dog” is poised for a breakout season with the Wolverines having to account for the loss of both Trey Burke and Tim Hardaway Jr. As a freshman Robinson posted averages of 11.0 points and 5.4 rebounds per game, and he has the skill needed to take advantage of the increased offensive opportunities that will comes his way in 2013-14.

6. Cleanthony Early (Wichita State): One reason why many expect the Shockers to win the Missouri Valley and possibly make some more noise nationally is Early, who averaged 13.9 points and 5.4 rebounds per game last season. The 6-foot-8 forward earned all-MVC and Newcomer of the Year honors, and he’s the early favorite to win MVC Player of the Year as a senior.

7. Kyle Anderson (UCLA): The attribute that would best describe Anderson’s game is “versatility,” with the sophomore being one of the options to run the point for Steve Alford’s Bruins. As a freshman Anderson, who spent the majority of his time off the ball due to the presence of Larry Drew II, led the Bruins in rebounding (8.6 rpg) while also averaging 9.7 points and 3.5 assists per game.

8. Sam Dekker (Wisconsin): The Badgers may have lost some key veterans but Dekker, who was one of the Big Ten’s best freshmen last year, is back for his sophomore campaign. Dekker shot 48% from the field in 2012-13, averaging 9.6 points and 3.4 rebounds per game.

9. James Young (Kentucky): For all the talent at John Calipari’s disposal it’s been Young, another of their six McDonald’s All-Americans, whose received the highest amount of praise from observers of the Wildcats’ early practices. Always a good perimeter shooter, Young has the length (6-foot-6) to be a matchup problem for opponents if he attacks the rim with greater regularity.

10. T.J. Warren (N.C. State): With four starters gone from last season’s NCAA tournament team it’s essentially Warren’s show in Raleigh in 2013-14. As a freshman the 6-foot-8 Warren shot 62% from the field, averaging 12.1 points and 4.2 rebounds per game.

source: Getty Images
Getty Images


  • 11. Luke Hancock (Louisville): The reigning Final Four MOP is a versatile player who can make things happen both on and off the ball, and his leadership abilities have proven valuable for the Cardinals as well.
  • 12. Will Sheehey (Indiana): Given the amount of talent Indiana lost from last year’s Big Ten champion squad, Sheehey (9.5 ppg, 3.5 rpg) will be expected to do a lot more this season. Sheehey shot 49% from the field as a junior.
  • 13. LaQuinton Ross (Ohio State): Is this the year in which Ross puts it all together? He played very well for the Buckeyes in postseason play, averaging 15 points during the NCAA tournament and hitting the game-winning three to push Ohio State past Arizona in the Sweet 16.
  • 14. Treveon Graham (VCU): For as much attention as the Rams’ “HAVOC” system receives, it should also be noted that in Graham they’ve got one of the nation’s best swingmen. Graham averaged 15.1 points and 5.8 rebounds per game in 2012-13, shooting 45% from the field and 37% from beyond the arc.
  • 15. Dezmine Wells (Maryland): After spending much of last season adjusting to a new program Wells may be poised to take off in 2013-14. The Xavier transfer averaged 13.1 points and 4.9 rebounds per game last season, and he was also second on the team in assists (3.0 apg).
  • 16. JaKarr Sampson (St. John’s): Sampson may be one of the best athletes in the country, and he’ll be a primary scoring option for Steve Lavin’s Red Storm after averaging 14.9 points and 6.6 rebounds per game as a freshman. For his efforts Sampson was named Big East Rookie of the Year.
  • 17. Fuquan Edwin (Seton Hall): Edwin is one of the nation’s most underrated players (the Pirates’ lack of success has had something to do with it), and the hope in South Orange is that he receives more attention in 2013-14. As a junior Edwin posted averages of 16.5 points, 5.8 rebounds and 2.4 steals per game.
  • 18. Damyean Dotson (Oregon): Dotson played very well as a freshman for an Oregon squad that reached the Sweet 16 for the first time in a decade, averaging 11.4 points and 3.5 rebounds per game. Dotson ended the season with six straight double-digit scoring outings.
  • 19. Branden Dawson (Michigan State): Dawson’s dealt with injuries for much of his career, but he played in all 36 games last season and averaged 8.9 points, 5.9 rebounds and 1.6 steals per game. Still a high-level athlete, Dawson’s production will be key if the Spartans are to have a shot at getting to the Final Four.
  • 20. Jabari Bird (California): Losing leading scorer Allen Crabbe is a big deal, but the arrival of Bird is one reason why the folks in Berkeley aren’t panicking. An excellent athlete, Bird earned a spot in the McDonald’s All-America Game and averaged 17.2 points and 6.8 rebounds per game as a senior in high school.

JaKarr Sampson, St. John’s tied for 3rd in Big East after win over Seton Hall

St. John's
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Freshman JaKarr Sampson scored 19 points on 9-of-16 shooting from the floor as St. John’s defeated Seton Hall, 71-67, Sunday at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

It was Sampson’s seventh straight game scoring in double figures and he continues to build his strong resume for the league’s Rookie of the Year. With the victory, St. John’s moves into a tie for third place in the Big East conference after being chosen to finish 10th in the preseason media poll.

The Red Storm have struggled through some growing pains, including a loss to UNC-Asheville at home to end the non-conference season and shooting 36 percent in a loss to Georgetown on Jan. 12, but have now won four games in a row and have pulled into a tie for third in the Big East with a conference mark of 5-3.

Despite aging by one year and being older than the historically young team St. John’s sent to the floor last season, this is still one of the youngest teams in the country. The starting lineup Sunday against Seton Hall featured four sophomores and a freshman.

They showed maturity down the stretch Sunday after letting a 16-point second-half lead dwindle down to just one with 4:22 to play. Sophomore D’Angelo Harrison led all scorers with 24 points and hit two big off-balance jumpers and four free throws in the final 2:30 of regulation to help seal the win.

St. John’s leads the country in blocks, led by freshman Chris Obekpa (4.6 blocks per game), which allows for more defensive gambling on the perimeter from its guards. With Obekpa as a shot blocker around the rim, the length and athleticism on the perimeter becomes more bothersome for opponents and offers one of the more unique, though undersized defensive attacks in the conference.

St. John’s already has quality conference wins over Cincinnati on the road and Notre Dame, and now moves on to another winnable game at home against DePaul on Jan. 30. The road in the Big East is a difficult one, but that also gives coach Steve Lavin and  his team a chance to chalk up quality wins and built a postseason-worthy resume.

So could we be talking about an NCAA tournament bubble team? Lavin has already taken one of his St. John’s teams dancing, and the young Red Storm are on the right path for some kind of postseason berth, come March.

Daniel Martin is a writer and editor at JohnnyJungle.com, covering St. John’s. You can find him on Twitter:@DanielJMartin_

St. John’s JaKarr Sampson making a statement slam at Midnight Madness

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Friday night, the first of many highlight slams from Midnight Madness surfaced, as St. John’s freshman forward, JaKarr Sampson threw down a 360 dunk at Carnesecca Arena.

The video was uploaded to SocialCam.com via NYCHoops.net (VIDEO).

As part of the dunk contest, Sampson received some assistance from junior forward Orlando Sanchez. The 6-foot-9 Sanchez, showed off some soccer skills, using a rainbow kick to flip the ball to himself and throwing an alley-oop to Sampson charging from the baseline.

The athleticism Sampson provided in the dunk contest became the theme for the evening and potentially the season. Following the Midnight Madness in New York, ESPN analyst, Tarik Turner, talked about the revamp Red Storm team.

The athleticism and the depth. Those were the two things that stood out to me. You have so much talent on the court now because you have a bigger frontline.

Sampson is one of Steve Lavin’s impressive recruiting class, along with forward Chris Obekpa and guard Felix Balamou.

St. John’s struggled in 2011-2012 ending 13-19 (6-12 Big East)

Terrence is also the lead writer at NEHoopNews.com and can be followed on Twitter: @terrence_payne