Tag: Iowa State

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Naz Long forces OT in No. 16 Iowa State’s come-from-behind win over Oklahoma State (VIDEO)

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At this point, there should be no questioning whether or not Oklahoma State is back to being the team that they were back in December.

If it wasn’t for a missed free throw from Phil Forte, an 88.9% free throw shooter, and a buzzer-beating three from Naz Long at the end of regulation, the Cowboys would have gone into Hilton Coliseum and knocked off No. 16 Iowa State:

Instead, DeAndre Kane scored seven of his 27 points in overtime as the Cyclones pulled out an 85-81 come-from-behind win. Oklahoma State took a 32-25 lead into the break and opened the second half with a 13-4 run to go up 16 points, but the Cyclones responded with a 34-12 surge setting up the thrilling finish.

Hilton Magic is real, y’all.

Kane, a Big 12 Player of the Year candidate, added eight assists and seven boards. Georges Niang finished with 22 points and six boards, but he and Melvin Ejim both fouled out of the game.

The story here isn’t how good Iowa State is, however. We know they are, and we know that they don’t lose at home. If you’re surprised by this outcome, you shouldn’t be. The talking point needs to be the Cowboys. This is a team that can make a long run in the NCAA tournament.

Marcus Smart scored 27 points (on 8-for-17 shooting) and added five assists and four steals while committing just two turnovers. Since the midway point of the second half against Kansas last Saturday, Smart has been simply sensational. He’s playing within the offense. He’s not forcing as many off-balance jumpers as he had been earlier this season. He’s still wreaking havoc on opposing offenses.

In fact, if he hadn’t fouled out of this one at the end of regulation, the overtime period could have played out very differently.

When Smart is playing this way, the Pokes can beat anyone in the country. I truly believe that. They knocked off Kansas in Stillwater. Kansas committed roughly 500 turnovers in that game and Andrew Wiggins had an off-night, so if you want to chalk that up as a fluke, go ahead. But the fact that Oklahoma State came within a missed free throw and a buzzer-beating three from beating Iowa State in Ames — which is tougher to do that beating Kansas at home — should make you reconsider.

The Pokes are probably going to end up being somewhere between a No. 7 and a No. 10 seed in the NCAA tournament. That’s what happens when you lose seven straight conference games. I’ll tell you this much: If you’re a No. 1 or No. 2 seed, you’re much more concerned about running into the Cowboys in the Round of 32 than you are running into Kentucky.

Preseason preparations include hot yoga sessions for Iowa State

Georges Niang
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Fred Hoiberg’s Iowa State Cyclones were one Aaron Craft shot away from taking Ohio State to overtime in the NCAA tournament Round of 32 last season. Alas, Craft’s clutch shot fell and it was the Buckeyes, not Iowa State, who booked tickets to Los Angeles for the West regional semifinals as a result.

With four of their top six scorers gone from that team, the Cyclones do have some work to do when it comes to role allocation. But they won’t lack for talent, with forwards Melvin Ejim (11.3 ppg, 9.3 rpg) and Georges Niang (12.1, 4.6) returning and Marshall transfer DeAndre Kane (15.1, 7.0 apg, 4.4 rpg) arrives to give Iowa State some much-needed firepower on the perimeter. With an eye towards the 2013-14 campaign Iowa State’s added an activity to its preseason workout routine: weekly hot yoga sessions.

Yoga can be very useful for athletes due to its effects on breathing techniques and flexibility, with the latter being an issue for some due to the weightlifting done in order to increase physical strength. Adding heat to the process, with the temperature in the studio reaching in upwards of 100 degrees, can act as a cleanser of sorts as noted in a story written by Travis Hines of the Ames Tribune.

“With the added heat, you sweat a lot more, which is great for caloric burn,” Emily Hampton, owner of Ignite Yoga and the team’s instructor, said. “But really most importantly you get rid of toxins. In yoga we squeeze a lot, release toxins, flush them with water and then get them out with our sweat. It’s kind of cleansing.

“The heat is really an important aspect in my opinion.”

The players were hesitant at first, which is understandable given the fact that hot yoga was a departure from their regular training regimen. But they’ve begun to notice the benefits, both mentally and physically, of hot yoga.

“I feel like it’s definitely built our mental toughness,” Niang said. “If you’re not used to doing something, just pushing your body to a new limit and having yourself know at the end of the day that you can do it when you went in to it thinking that you couldn’t.

“When Emily is telling you not to let up, this is all in your head, it’s so true,” he added. “It’s like when you’re down five with 30 seconds to go. You have to tell yourself you can do it and fight through.”

Whether it’s boot camps or yoga, teams will do some “unconventional” things during the offseason and it’s a good idea. It deviates from the standard routine, and the forced adaptation could ultimately benefit teams on the court in crucial moments. It’ll be interesting to see just how much of an impact the yoga sessions have on Iowa State’s production this season.

Former USC point guard Maurice Jones looking for a fresh start

Maurice Jones, Josh Huestis
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Just a few days into the fall semester last year, it was announced that USC point guard Maurice Jones was academically ineligible to play in 2012-13. Coming off of a season in which he averaged 13.0 points and 3.5 assists per game, Jones would have seen his role change some due to the addition of players who missed the 2011-12 season due to injury or transfer rules would could have helped handle the scoring load.

In theory that assistance would have made Jones a more efficient player, as he posted an offensive rating of 85.4 despite having a possession percentage of 27.4% as a sophomore according to kenpom.com. But Jones’ ineligibility turned out to be the first sign that the 2012-13 season wouldn’t be a stable one for the Trojans, who struggled with inconsistency all season long and eventually handed the keys to the program over to Andy Enfield in the spring.

What happened to Jones after being ruled ineligible? He transferred to Iowa State with the intention of being eligible to play for the Cyclones in 2013, but that plan fell through when he was ruled ineligible to join Fred Hoiberg’s program. With that door being closed the Saginaw, Mich. native spent last season at home. No basketball, no school. Jones is back on the college landscape this fall however, as he’s enrolled at Division II Northwood University in Midland, Mich. and has joined the basketball program.

“When I found out I didn’t have a scholarship, I transferred from Southern Cal, but then I couldn’t get a scholarship at Iowa State either,” Jones said. “I didn’t even go to school last year.

“Nobody was interested in letting me play. I was shooting around with one of my best friends from Saginaw, Darvin Ham, and he plays for Northwood. He said to give Northwood a chance. It’s funny, but once people found out I was going to Northwood, other coaches were a lot more interested.”

Jones expects to hear from the NCAA in regards to when he’ll be eligible to take the floor in a couple of weeks, with the hope that he’ll be allowed to play immediately according to Hugh Bernreuter of mlive.com. Jones’ situation is a bit more complicated than that of the standard transfer however, as he has two appeals to file.

According to the story not only is there the appeal to be allowed to play immediately, but also an appeal to regain the semester lost since he began the fall 2012 semester at USC. But regardless of what happens with his appeals Jones knows at he will have another opportunity to play somewhere, it’s just a matter of when.

Just a year ago, that possibility wasn’t a sure thing.