Tag: Indiana Hoosiers

Marshall Plumlee, Matt Jones, Amile Jefferson
Associated Press

LATE NIGHT SNACKS: No. 6 Duke, No. 12 Virginia win comfortably

Leave a comment

GAME OF THE DAY: No. 5 Kansas 70, No. 19 Vanderbilt 63

Wayne Selden Jr. scored a career-high 25 points and grabbed seven rebounds as the Jayhawks rebounded from a early deficit to win the Maui Jim Maui Invitational. Selden played well all week in Maui, and against the Commodores he made eight of his eleven shots from the field. Fellow guard Devonte’ Graham and Frank Mason III also scored in double figures, with Graham adding 12 points and Mason ten.

Damian Jones led the way offensively for Vanderbilt with 17 points while also grabbing ten rebounds and blocking four shots, but the Commodores’ cold night from three hurt them in the end. Vanderbilt shot just 6-for-27 from three on the night, while Kansas finished 8-for-16 from distance.


UNLV 72, No. 13 Indiana 69: The Runnin’ Rebels held off the Hoosiers in Maui, winning the fifth place game at the Maui Jim Maui Invitational and going 2-1 in the event. Patrick McCaw led the way for UNLV with 20 points, six assists and five steals, and Ben Carter’s block of a Nick Zeisloft three-pointer in the final seconds preserved the victory. Zeisloft scored 17 points and James Blackmon Jr. 13 for the Hoosiers, who went 1-2 in Maui and looked nothing like the Big Ten contender many expected them to be.

No. 14 Gonzaga 80, Washington 64: The Bulldog front court once again led the way, with Kyle Wiltjer scoring 24 points and grabbing 11 rebounds in a 16-point victory. Domas Sabonis added 17 points and nine rebounds, and Przemek Karnowski accounted for 12 points and six rebounds.

No. 18 Connecticut 74, Michigan 60: Daniel Hamilton led five Huskies in double figures with 16 points while also grabbing nine rebounds as UConn beat Michigan at the Battle 4 Atlantis. Caris LeVert led all scorers with 20 points, but his early foul trouble led to a major shift in momentum in the first half. The other Wolverines combined to shoot 11-for-44 from the field. Next up for UConn is old conference foe Syracuse in Thursday’s semifinals.


Chris Boucher, Oregon: Boucher set a school record for blocks in a game with nine while also scoring 17 points and grabbing nine rebounds in the Ducks’ win over Arkansas State.

Christen Cunningham, Samford: Cunningham shot 8-for-10 from three, scoring 26 points in the Bulldogs’ 75-58 win over Idaho.

Darien Nelson-Henry, Penn: In a game that included the nation’s leading scorer in La Salle’s Jordan Price, Nelson-Henry scored 31 points and grabbed 14 boards in the Quakers’ 80-64 win over the Explorers.


Anthony Lindauer, High Point: Lindauer went scoreless in the Panthers’ 49-46 loss at Georgia, missing all ten of his field goal attempts.

Amar Stukes, La Salle: Stukes shot 1-for-12 from the field in the Explorers’ Big Five loss to Penn, scoring two points.


  • No. 2 Maryland put together its most complete effort of the season to date in the title game of the Cancun Challenge, beating Rhode Island 86-63. Melo Trimble and Rasheed Sulaimon scored 17 apiece (on combined 13-for-14 shooting from the field) and Robert Carter Jr. added 15 for the Terrapins, who had five players score in double figures.
  • No. 6 Duke pulled away from preseason Ivy League favorite Yale in the second half winning by 19 in Durham. Matt Jones led four Blue Devils in double figures with 17 points.
  • No. 12 Virginia also pulled away in the second half of its game, outscoring Lehigh 45-28 over the final 20 minutes in their 80-54 win in Charlottesville. Malcolm Brogdon led the way with a game-high 23 points.
  • No. 21 Oregon moved to 5-0 with a 91-68 win over Arkansas State. Chris Boucher (17 points, nine rebounds, nine blocks) nearly tallied a triple-double, and Dwayne Benjamin scored 25 off the bench for the Ducks.
  • No. 25 Texas A&M beat Texas 84-73 at the Battle 4 Atlantis, winning the first meeting between the two programs since the Aggies moved from the Big 12 to the SEC. Danuel House scored 19 points and grabbed seven rebounds and Anthony Collins added 15, five and six assists. They’ll play Gonzaga in Thursday’s semifinals.


  • Michael Gbinije scored 26 points, Trevor Cooney added 19 and freshman Tyler Lydon racked up 18, eight rebounds and six blocks at Syracuse took care of Charlotte, 83-70, at the Battle 4 Atlantis.
  • Florida rebounded from its loss to Purdue on Sunday with an 86-62 win over Vermont. Dorian Finney-Smith accounted for 20 points, six rebounds, six assists and three steals.
  • Wake Forest beat UCLA 80-77 to earn a third-place finish at the Maui Jim Maui Invitational. Devin Thomas led the Demon Deacons with 21 points and nine rebounds, with Tony Parker pacing the Bruins with 18 points and 15 rebounds.
  • Bronson Koenig led six players in double figures with 16 points as Wisconsin beat Prairie View A&M 85-67 in Madison. Ethan Happ grabbed eight rebounds and Nigel Hayes dished out seven assists for the winners.
  • Jeremy Senglin scored 23 points as Weber State beat Murray State 75-59 to win the Gulf Coast Showcase in Florida. Joel Bolomboy added 15 points and ten rebounds.
  • Geoffrey Groselle scored 20 points and grabbed nine rebounds as Creighton rolled to the Men Who Speak Up Main Event title with a 97-76 win over UMass in Las Vegas. Five Bluejays scored in double figures, and as a team they shot 51 percent from the field.

Yogi Ferrell gets one more chance to shape his legacy at Indiana

Yogi Ferrell
AP Photo
1 Comment

Yogi Ferrell entered Indiana as the McDonald’s All-American centerpiece of a five-man, all-Indiana recruiting class that was ranked No. 5 in the country. Coming on the heels of a surprise Sweet 16 appearance, this was supposed to be the class that helped bring the Hoosiers back to glory.

An ultra-talented point guard who can score or distribute, Yogi was viewed by some Indiana fans as the next Isiah Thomas. But disappointing results, ugly off-the-court incidents and roster turnover became the trend at Indiana the last few years. After Ferrell spurned the NBA to return for his senior season, he became the only player still at Indiana from the class that was supposed to define the Tom Crean era.

With Crean on the hot seat and a proud Indiana program suffering a Final Four drought since 2002, the pressure is on for a talented Hoosier team to make a big move this season. As the senior point guard, Ferrell knows a lot of that burden falls on him.

“We’re just trying to play better and do what we’re supposed to do and show people what we’re capable of,” Ferrell told NBCSports.com.

“We want to rep our state and put on for the state of Indiana.”

Indiana has seen a lot of new faces during Ferrell’s three seasons on campus. He’s the only senior on the Hoosiers who didn’t transfer into the program.

After some early difficulties during a hellacious rebuild, Crean successfully recruited pieces like Jordan Hulls, Victor Oladipo and Cody Zeller. The Hoosiers seemed to be on the right track after knocking off No. 1 Kentucky during the 2011-12 regular season and making a surprising run to the Sweet 16. Ferrell and his 2012 classmates were lauded as the group that would put Indiana over the hump. Sweet 16 appearances were supposed to be the baseline by which Indiana measured success.

Ferrell and three other members of the 2012 class, small forward Jeremy Hollowell, forward Hanner Mosquera-Perea — both four-star prospects — and center Peter Jurkin were grassroots teammates together with Indiana Elite. At every tournament Indiana Elite played in, flocks of Indiana fans would follow, hoping to see the bright future of Hoosier basketball as four commitments shared the floor in the same starting lineup.

Things began to unravel before that 2012 group could even make it to Bloomington.

Shooting guard Ron Patterson, the fifth member of the class, went to prep school instead of Indiana and eventually ended up at Syracuse. That would be the first of many dominoes to fall around Ferrell the next few years.

Indiana was at one point the No. 1 team in the country and made the Sweet 16 in Ferrell’s freshman season, but Oladipo and Zeller left early for the NBA.

Joining the starting lineup and taking the reigns as a team leader, Ferrell and his teammates endured a disappointing 2013-14 season that saw the Hoosiers barely finish above .500.

More members of the 2012 class fled Bloomington. Hollowell transferred to Georgia State after the season and Jurkin soon followed him out the door.

The exodus at Indiana continued the next spring as Mosquera-Perea was dismissed from the program in May along with sophomore Devin Davis. The Hoosiers — again — found themselves with more roster turnover and Ferrell’s 2012 classmates were all gone.

MORE: Previewing the Big Ten

Through it all, Ferrell has tried to remain focused and be a positive influence in the locker room. He expected to be a senior surrounded by familiar faces from that celebrated recruiting class, but plans changed and he had to adapt to being a different type of leader.

“We’re growing and trying to get our new guys to know our system,” Ferrell said. “The season is right around the corner. We’ve had guys come in and out and the personnel has changed. But I have to help get them ready. I have to be a leader on and off the court.”

Indiana has seen plenty of off-the-court incidents during Ferrell’s tenure with the team and he hasn’t been immune to incident himself. After that disappointing sophomore season, Ferrell was issued a citation with former teammate Stanford Robinson and charged with minor consumption of an alcoholic beverage and possession of a false identification.

Ending up in the headlines for a drinking ticket could have sent Ferrell in a downward spiral and sent him searching for a new home like many of his former teammates. Instead, Ferrell overcame the off-the-court chaos and continued to mature both on and off the court.

“I wouldn’t trade Yogi for any player in the country,” Crean said at Big Ten media day.

A glimmer of hope emerged for Indiana’s future last season as Ferrell became more efficient as a shooter, started setting up teammates for more assists and showed more consistency on the defensive end. The point guard’s breakout season, coupled with new reinforcements, helped lead the Hoosiers back to the NCAA tournament after the disappointing sophomore year with no postseason.

Plenty of perimeter firepower returns around Ferrell this season with James Blackmon Jr., Robert Johnson and Troy Williams all coming back. With McDonald’s All-American big man Thomas Bryant entering the starting lineup in the middle, the Hoosiers have top-25 talent — more than enough to make a run in Ferrell’s final season. Crean is sitting squarely on the hot seat and this will be the season at Indiana that could define both the veteran head coach and his senior point guard.

Both Crean and Ferrell have underperformed to the lofty expectations of Indiana fans, but a huge year would erase some of the bad memories.

There is already a noticeable difference in the Hoosiers’ roster this season with the addition of Bryant and former Michigan big man Max Bielfeldt, a graduate transfer senior who should give Indiana more interior depth.

“It’s been nice adding big men who can help us right away,” Ferrell said. “Max being a veteran and Thomas being as talented as he is, those are some high-level guys.”

“We’ve improved on the defensive end. We can get into the ball more [as perimeter defenders] since we have the rim protected.”

As his Indiana career currently stands, Ferrell has put up good numbers and played on some fun teams, but he doesn’t have many important wins to show for it. The only time he’s won a NCAA tournament game was in 2013 during his freshman year when others like Zeller and Oladipo carried the team.

Things didn’t go according to plan for Ferrell during his rocky journey at Indiana, and in a cruel twist of fate, he’s actually come to define the Crean era at Indiana: high expectations, disappointing finishes and off-the-court issues.

But Yogi’s senior year with a talented Indiana team gives him a chance to write his own final chapter. As the driving engine of a Big Ten contender, he gets one more chance to change the way he’ll be remembered in Bloomington.

VIDEO: Troy Williams steals the show at Hoosier Hysteria

Troy Williams
AP Photo
Leave a comment

Indiana junior forward Troy Williams is known for his high-flying rim assaults and he’s also the Big Ten’s returning leading rebounder. So Williams winning the dunk contest at Saturday night’s Hoosier Hysteria came as little surprise, as Williams effortlessly threw down some slams to impress the home crowd.

But it was the junior’s improved perimeter shooting that had Assembly Hall buzzing. The 6-foot-7 Williams also won the event’s 3-point contest, despite coming into the event with 12 career triples in two seasons. Here’s video of his improved perimeter stroke in winning the contest.

It remains to be seen if Williams winning this 3-point contest is a fluke, but his perimeter shot certainly does look more consistent. Shooting at game speed is dramatically different than taking balls off a rack, but if Williams can space the floor even a little bit more for Indiana it makes a potent offense that much more dangerous.

(H/T: Inside the Hall)