Georgetown Hoyas

LAS VEGAS, NV - NOVEMBER 25:  Kamar Baldwin #3 of the Butler Bulldogs brings the ball up the cout against the Arizona Wildcats during the championship game of the 2016 Continental Tire Las Vegas Invitational basketball tournament at the Orleans Arena on November 25, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Butler won 69-65.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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No. 18 Butler outlasts Georgetown as Hoyas drop to 0-4 in Big East

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — Freshman Kamar Baldwin scored a career-high 16 points as the No. 18 Bulldogs followed up their upset win over No. 1 Villanova by going into snowy Washington D.C. and knocking off Georgetown in overtime, 85-76.

Kelan Martin added 11 points for the Bulldogs, who are now 14-2 on the season with one of the best profiles in the sport. They beat Indiana. They beat Cincinnati. They beat Arizona in Las Vegas, a neutral site game with a crowd that was anything-but. They won at Utah. They were the first team to beat Villanova since March 12th, 2016.

And while you may not know any of the names on Butler, that’s may be precisely what makes the Bulldogs so good.

Martin was an NBC Sports Midseason All-American, but you wouldn’t know it if you watched the game on Saturday. He was 3-for-12 from the floor and fired up a couple of terrible shots down the stretch, including an airball at the end of regulation. Andrew Chrabacsz, who is probably Butler’s second-best player, wasn’t all that good either, finishing with nine points and four boards on 4-for-10 shooting.

Off-nights from your two best players is not the best way to win road games in league play, but Butler was able to do just that.

Why?

Baldwin, for one. He may be the quickest player in all of college basketball, and he showed it on Saturday, getting his career-high on an array of nifty drives to the rim while knocking down a trio of threes. That’s a nice third option to have. It’s also nice have a guy like Kethan Savage on the roster, a fifth-year senior that battled an illness at the started of the year but entered Saturday averaging 11.0 points in Big East play; he had 13 points, including seven in a late 11-2 run, when Butler knocked off Villanova, and scored six of his 11 points on Saturday in the extra period.

And then there’s Nate Fowler, a sophomore big man that entered Saturday averaging just 11.6 minutes per game. Against the Hoyas, Fowler not only played the crunch time minutes, but he scored Butler’s last five points in regulation and scored on a putback to give the Bulldogs a 76-70 lead with just over a minute to play in OT.

Put all of that together, and what you get is this Butler team.

They have a star that can carry them, that can win a game on his own, in Martin. Ask Indiana, who watched Martin score 28 points against them despite going scoreless for the first 15 minutes. They have an all-conference caliber secondary option in Chrabacsz. And they have a trio of role players that have proven to have the mettle to win league games for them on the road.

That’s tough.

Jagan Mosely scored a career-high 20 points for the Hoyas, while L.J. Peak added 22 points and Marcus Derrickson chipped in with 14, but it wasn’t enough the Hoyas, who entered the afternoon 8-7 on the season after their first 0-3 start in the Big East since 1999. That was the final year of John Thompson II’s tenure with the Hoyas, which is ironic considering the current angst among Hoya fans with the Thompson regime. Georgetown now does not have a Big East win over a team not named St. John’s or DePaul since Jan. 26th of last season, which was 14 games ago.

This win would have done quite a bit to ease the pressure weighing on this program, because despite being a team that is sitting at .500 on the season, Georgetown is more relevant in the NCAA tournament picture than people may realize. Yes, the Hoyas lost at home to Arkansas State, which isn’t quite as bad as that team’s league affiliation may have you believe. And yes, they lost at Providence and at Marquette to start off Big East play, but road games in conference are never going to be a black mark on anyone’s résumé.

Put another way, Georgetown’s current profile is not good.

But it’s salvageable. That win they have over Oregon? It’s only going to look better and better as the season goes on, and the good thing about being in a league as tough as the Big East is that, in theory, there would be plenty of quality wins available. The Hoyas missed on two of them now, but they still have six games left against Villanova, Butler, Creighton and Xavier. And they still have four games left against St. John’s and DePaul. Three of the four games they play against Providence, Marquette and Seton Hall are at home.

It’s not impossible.

It’s not over yet.

But if they don’t get things turned around soon, it will be the third time in the last four seasons that JT III has missed the NCAA tournament.

Georgetown beats Syracuse 78-71 in rivalry renewal

LAHAINA, HI - NOVEMBER 23: Rodney Pryor #23 of the Georgetown Hoyas glides to the basket and shoots during the second half of the Maui Invitational NCAA college basketball game at the Lahaina Civic Center on November 23, 2016 in Lahaina, Hawaii. (Photo by Darryl Oumi/Getty Images). Oklahoma State won the game 97-70.
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SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) If only Syracuse had the “Pearl” – on the court instead of in their hearts.

On a day the Orange paid tribute to the late Dwayne “Pearl” Washington, L.J. Peak and Rodney Pryor put a damper on the day, combining for 43 points as Georgetown held off Syracuse 78-71 on Saturday.

Peak had 23 points and 11 rebounds and Pryor added 20 points to key the victory in the renewal of a once-fierce Big East rivalry, which Washington was a big part of.

“Whenever Georgetown wins in the Carrier Dome, it’s a big win for the program,” Hoyas coach John Thompson III said. “This rivalry, these two institutions, when you think about the Big East you think about Pearl, Patrick (Ewing) and Chris Mullin. When you come up here and it’s Pearl weekend, it’s like they need some extra incentive? Without a doubt, he’s one of the pillars of the Big East.”

Syracuse (6-4), which has struggled to form any kind of consistency so far this season, didn’t find much again. Tyler Lydon was the bright spot with a career-high 29 points, missing only 1 of 13 shots, but where Washington once worked his magic, the Orange guards continued to struggle.

John Gillon had 13 points on 4-of-14 shooting in his first start of the season and Frank Howard had four points, four assists and a game-high six turnovers. Andrew White, who has started in the backcourt six times this season, had 12 points on 3-of-11 shooting in 40 minutes.

RELATED: Syracuse honored Pearl Washington before the game

“We’re just not playing well at the guard spot I don’t think at all,” Orange coach Jim Boeheim said. “We’re making too many mistakes. We’re not getting the ball in the basket from the guard spot. We haven’t in any of our four losses and we’ve got to play better there.”

Georgetown (7-4) has won five straight, the first four coming against teams from the lower echelons of Division I.

The Hoyas matched the largest lead of the game when Jonathan Mullmore drained a 3 to give Georgetown a 67-60 lead with 2:36 left. The Hoyas hung on at the end after Lydon’s follow slam and baseline hook moved the Orange within 69-66 with 64 seconds left.

Georgetown has lived at the free-throw line this year and that helped the Hoyas survive this one. They were 22 of 25 from the line, nine coming in the final 38 seconds, while the Orange was 14 of 25.

It was Pearl Washington Day inside the Carrier Dome and the former Syracuse star, who died in April of cancer at age 52, was celebrated on a snowy, wintry day. Syracuse University is establishing the Pearl Washington Endowed Fund for Continuing Education and set a $1 million endowment goal. The fund will support student-athletes who leave the university and later return to pursue their degrees.

A framed photo of Washington and a piece of the basketball court were presented to Washington’s family at center court during a halftime celebration. A No. 31, Washington’s number at Syracuse, also was unveiled and adhered to the wooden surface at center court.

“This is a very special weekend. Very special, especially since it’s the Georgetown game,” said Rafael Addison, a teammate of Washington in the 1980s. “It’s hard to talk about him. Pearl would be very pleased with the outpouring of love. (When the 31 peeled off) it felt like he was in the building. He loved this building. He loved this community. He had so much life, so much charisma.”

White hit his first two 3-pointers as Syracuse rushed to an 11-4 lead in the first 5:08, giving the Orange the biggest lead of the first half, 11-4. The Hoyas clawed back behind Peak’s 12 points in the opening period, and when Peak hit a follow shot to tie the game at 31-all in the final two minutes, it almost seemed like an Orange omen.

It wasn’t.

“We need to improve, take care of business,” White said. “That kind of puts a sour taste in the whole theme of the night. It happens sometimes.”

BIG PICTURE

Georgetown: Hoyas entered the game averaging 28.5 trips to the free-throw line and that’s been a huge factor. They were shooting 77.5 percent on free throws before the game. … Hoyas have won six of their last eight meetings with Syracuse.

Syracuse: A video montage of Washington highlights was shown before the game. .. The Orange leads the series with Georgetown 49-43 but is 7-11 against John Thompson III. Hoyas are 13-30 on the road against Syracuse. … Seven-foot-2 center Paschal Chukwu, a transfer from Providence, had retina surgery on Saturday and is out indefinitely. He’s played 108 minutes in seven games and had not played in two of the previous three games but still led the team with 14 blocks.

ONE FOR PEARL: “We just wanted to make sure that Pearl was honored. He was,” Boeheim said. “We’re just happy we could do that. We had a lot of support from a lot of people.”

UP NEXT

Georgetown: Hosts UNC Greensboro at the Verizon Center next Thursday.

Syracuse: Hosts Eastern Michigan on Monday.

More AP college basketball at http://collegebasketball.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP-Top25

No. 16 Badgers pummel Georgetown on the glass for Maui win

Wisconsin forward Ethan Happ (22) shoots as Georgetown center Jessie Govan (15) defends in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in the Maui Invitational Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016, in Lahaina, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
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Wisconsin bullied its way to another win in Hawaii.

The 16th-ranked Badgers pulled down 20 offensive rebounds, got 20 points from Bronson Koenig and 19 from Ethan Happ as they defeated Georgetown, 73-57, in the semifinals of the Maui Invitational on Tuesday evening.

Wisconsin held just a three-point advantage at halftime, but continued to pull away from the Hoyas slowly but surely throughout the second half.

The Hoyas looked to be in position to claim a second-straight win over a ranked opponent after they bested Oregon on Monday, but surrendering 19 second-chance points to the Badgers was their undoing.

While Wisconsin finished the day with a comfortable win, there are a few interesting things to explore with coach Greg Gard’s team.

The Badgers’ uncharacteristic issues with turnovers continued yet again against the Hoyas. They finished with 13 giveaways, which rated a 19.7 turnover percentage. In the first half, when the Badgers allowed Georgetown to stay close, they were at an unsightly 24.2 percent.

For seven-straight years, they ranked in the top-five nationally in turnover percentage (including No. 1 twice) until they free-fell out of the top-100 last year amid the Bo Ryan-Gard transition with a rate of 17.1 percent. This year, it’s fallen to 22.5 percent, which ranked 289th on Tuesday night.

That’s an issue for Wisconsin given every one of their possession takes on added importance compared to other programs given their snail’s pace. Their offense runs on precision and not only are turnovers a wasted possession, they’re an indicator of sloppy play, something they’ll struggle to survive.

The other component is that when the Badgers shoot, something good typically happens. Not only is their effective field goal percentage 54.5, they are an elite offensive rebounding team, grabbing 44 percent of their misses, which ranks eighth nationally.

That’s how the Badgers were able to wear down Georgetown throughout night as they absolutely dominated the glass and erased their turnover issue and so-so shooting.

Essentially, Wisconsin doesn’t necessarily have to make shots to be good offensively, they just need to take shots.

Wisconsin’s issues obviously are offset by what the Badgers do well, and they’ll be fine with guys like Koenig, Nigel Hayes and Happ, plus their supporting cast, on the roster whether or not the turnover numbers come down or remain static.

But it’ll be interesting to see as the Badgers’ season unfolds which stats are here to stay and which will move closer to norms. If Wisconsin can clean up its turnover problems while maintaining its high-level offensive rebounding, its offense is going to be a problem for the rest of the Big Ten – and perhaps much of the country.

Terps score stunning last-minute comeback against Hoyas

Melo Trimble
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It wasn’t a thing of beauty or expertly executed, but Maryland’s meeting with Georgetown sure was intense and exciting.

The Hoyas led by seven with just over a minute left, but fumbled away the victory will sloppy play and mistakes as the Terps came from behind to win 76-75 in a Gavitt Tipoff Games matchup Tuesday night.

Much of the evening was a slog with fouls wiping away any opportunity for the game to be played with any type of flow, but the finish offered redemption for a game that featured a combined 56 fouls and 64 free throws.

After going up 70-63 with 1:14 left, Georgetown surrendered a 3-pointer, sent Maryland to the line for six free throws and committed two turnovers that allowed the Terps the unlikely comeback.

The game’s wildest moments were saved for the finish.

The Terps cut the lead to three, 73-70, with 19 seconds left, and as Georgetown inbounded the ball, Rodney Pryor was whistled for traveling as he slid upon receiving the pass. Then, the Hoyas sent Anthony Cowan to the line with a deadball foul that allowed the Terps to add two points without the clock dwindling.

Tre Campbell followed that up with a pair of free throws, but Melo Trimble answered with a layup. On the ensuing inbounds, Campbell tried to get around a trap, but dribbled out of bounds to give Maryland the ball down just one.

Trimble then made a pair of free throws after he was fouled on the inbounds pass to give Maryland a lead that Kevin Huerter would protect on the other end when he blocked Jagan Mosely’s potential game-winning layup as time expired.

It was a wild, wild finish and one that undoubtedly will leave Georgetown wondering exactly what went wrong. It’s hard to term the finish anything short of a meltdown as it failing to finish off a seemingly sure-thing in the final minute at home against a rival. The Hoyas have some solid non-conference opportunities still ahead of them with Oregon and Syracuse on the docket, but it’s going to be difficult to get over this result.

For the Terps, it’s a stunning turnaround. Trimble’s final line is solid – 22 points on 7 of 14 shooting along with two rebounds and two assists – but it doesn’t really tell the full story of how well he played, carrying Maryland for major stretches. Justin Jackson providing 17 points off the bench is a big development as well.

Four-star point guard commits to Georgetown

John Thompson III
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John Thompson III just won a big recruiting battle.

Tremont Waters, a top-40 recruit in the Class of 2017, committed to Georgetown on Wednesday at a ceremony at his high school.

The four-star point guard chose the Hoyas after visiting the school last weekend.

“The feeling I had when I went to Georgetown, everyone pretty much welcomed me into the family,” Waters told reporters Wednesday. “I feel like they’re saying I won’t be there for four years, but I’ll be a part of the family the rest of my life.

“That’s why I chose them.”

Waters, a Connecticut native, becomes the first, and a pivotal, commit for Thompson in the 2017 class.

Tremont Waters is a great grab for the Hoyas as he gives them a pass-first floor leader who is accustomed to making his big men better,” NBCSports.com recruiting analyst Scott Phillips said. “With a Georgetown roster so full of front court players, Waters should be able to get those guys a lot of looks.”

It’s also worth noting that the Hoyas beat out Kentucky, Indiana and Kansas for Waters. Georgetown’s recruiting hasn’t exactly fallen off a cliff in recent years, but the Hoyas haven’t been landing players at the highest levels lately, either.

Waters’ decision to join the Hoyas over those other blue bloods is at least a strong sign that the Georgetown name still carries weight in recruiting circles and with top recruits.

Former top-100 recruit transferring from Georgetown

NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 13:  Paul White #13 of the Georgetown Hoyas reacts against the Xavier Musketeers during a semifinal game of the Big East basketball tournament at Madison Square Garden on March 13, 2015 in New York City.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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After a disappointing and injury-ended sophomore season, Paul White is transferring from Georgetown, the school announce Thursday.

The 6-foot-8 junior averaged 18.4 minutes per game as a freshman, but saw his minutes halved as a sophomore as a hip injury held him out of the first four games of last season before he underwent surgery in January that ended his sophomore campaign.

Given Georgetown’s depth at his position, White was probably going to have a hard time finding minutes with the Hoyas this season, which likely paved the way for his exit.

White was a consensus top-100 recruit coming out of powerhouse Chicago high school Whitney Young in 2014 with offers from the likes of UConn, Arizona, Florida, Ohio State, Wisconsin and a host of others.