Dustin Hogue

Dustin Hogue

Five members of Iowa State’s 2014-15 team have been arrested after two more arrests this week


Iowa State had more off-the-court issues this week as former senior forward Dustin Hogue was charged with OWI and former walk-on Kourtlin Jackson, who intends to transfer, was charged with a class “D” felony assault and public intoxication, a misdemeanor.

Both arrests were reported by the Iowa State Daily, and Jackson’s assault charge is expected to be downgraded to assault causing bodily harm according to the Ames Tribune.

The arrests of Hogue and Jackson means that five different Cyclones from the 2014-15 roster have been arrested within the last 12 months. Abdel Nader and Matt Thomas were both suspended the first two games of the 2014-15 season after being arrested for OWI last offseason. Transfer wing Bryce Dejean-Jones was arrested in December for “hosting a drug house” (marijuana), “nuisance party regulations” and a “noise violation.” Charges against Dejean-Jones were later dropped, but he was still suspended for the Cyclones’ game against Iowa during the season.

Head coach Fred Hoiberg is recovering from successful heart surgery on Friday, so you can’t necessarily blame him for not closely watching over two (now former) players. But it highlights a disturbing trend of recent arrests among Iowa State basketball players and certainly isn’t a good look for their program.

Three players getting arrested after drinking and driving, in particular, highlights that the Cyclones aren’t stressing enough importance on that issue to its players.

Five Cyclones reach double figures as No. 14 Iowa State wins at Iowa

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With Bryce Dejean-Jones serving a one-game suspension No. 14 Iowa State arrived in Iowa City for its game against in-state rival Iowa shorthanded. How much would that matter against an Iowa team that to this point in the season has shown signs of making progress on the defensive end of the floor? Not much at all, as the Cylcones pulled away for the 90-75 win thanks in large part to a 24-4 run to open the second half.

Iowa had its chances in the first half, as Iowa State’s Georges Niang managed to score just two points on 1-for-8 shooting. However other players stepped forward for Fred Hoiberg’s team, and as a result the Cyclones took a five-point lead into the intermission.

Abdel Nader, who entered the game shooting 0-for-9 from three, hit three three-pointers in the first half and Naz Long did as well. Add in eight points and three assists from Monte Morris (he now has 47 assists and just six turnovers on the season) and Dustin Hogue’s nine rebounds, and Iowa State managed to hang onto their lead in spite of Niang’s slow start. And once the the junior forward, who finished the game with 16 points, seven assists and six rebounds, got going the Cyclones pulled away.

As a team Iowa State shot better than 53 percent from the field, and their unselfishness on the offensive end caused trouble for Iowa for much of the night. Five players scored in double figures (Long scored 21 to lead the way), and 22 of the Cyclones’ 34 made field goals were assisted. Iowa entered the game ranked among the best teams in America in field goal percentage defense, with opponents shooting just 33.7% from the field.

Unfortunately for the Hawkeyes that production didn’t carry over into Friday’s game, as Iowa State’s ball and player movement proved to be too much for Fran McCaffery’s team to overcome. Iowa State scored 40 of its 90 points in the paint, and when they weren’t finding looks inside the Cyclones knocked down plenty from beyond the arc.

Iowa State will welcome back Dejean-Jones for their next game, and in eight days Jameel McKay becomes eligible to play. There’s plenty of room for growth for Iowa State moving forward, and given Hoiberg’s success in Ames it would be a surprise if said growth didn’t occur. Iowa State may not be a team that can roll out ten players without breaking a sweat, but they don’t lack for options either.

With Niang kept quiet for a half the Cyclones needed other contributors to step forward, and that’s exactly what happened.

College Basketball Talk’s Top 100 Players: Nos. 80-61 #CBTTop100

Bobby Portis
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College Basketball Talk’s Top 100 Players: Nos. 100-81

College Basketball Talk’s Top 100 Players: Nos. 100-81

2014-2015 Season Preview: Stanley Johnson, Sam Dekker lead wing forward rankings

Stanley Johnson (Arizona Athletics)
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source: Getty Images
Sam Dekker (Getty Images)

Beginning on October 3rd and running up until November 14th, the first day of the season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2014-2015 NBCSports.com college hoops preview package.

MORE: 2014-2015 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule

The wing position in college basketball this season will be fun to keep track of. It can be argued that from a depth standpoint this is the strongest position for incoming freshmen, with two players expected to be NBA Draft lottery selections in the near future and others expected to have a significant impact on their team’s fortunes. But there are also skilled veterans among the ranks, including one who reached the Final Four last season and another whose team fell one win short of that goal. What’s the common bond amongst many of these players? Versatility, which allows them to impact games in multiple facets.

Below are some of the best wings in college basketball this season, beginning with a gifted freshman from the Pac-12.

POSITION RANKINGS: Lead Guards | Off Guards | Wing Forwards | Big Men


1. Stanley Johnson, Arizona: Johnson has the build of a pro and the skill set to match, as he’s capable of scoring at all three levels with great consistency. He’s no slouch on the defensive end either, which is key when fitting into what was one of the nation’s best defensive teams a season ago. In a season without a clear-cut choice for national Player of the Year, Arizona’s freshman wing could be right in the mix come March.

2. Sam Dekker, Wisconsin: Dekker went from reserve to starter in 2013-14 and his productivity was one reason for the Badgers’ trek to the Final Four. Dekker averaged 12.9 points and 6.1 rebounds per game, shooting nearly 47 percent from the field. If he can raise his three-point shooting back to freshman year levels (39.1%), and he looked better shooting the ball at the LeBron James Skills Academy in July, Dekker becomes an even tougher assignment for opposing teams.

3. Delon Wright, Utah: The late Bum Phillips’ words regarding Earl Campbell may apply to Wright when it comes to discussing the most versatile players in college basketball: “he may not be in a class by himself, but it don’t take long to call roll.” Wright (15.5 ppg, 6.8 rpg, 5.3 apg) was a pivotal figure for the Utes in 2013-14, leading the team in scoring and assists. It could be argued that Wright should be on the lead guards list given how often he’s allowed to initiate the offense for Larry Krystkowiak’s team, but he fits in at any of the three perimeter positions.

4. Kelly Oubre, Kansas: One of three freshmen to make the top ten in our list, Oubre has the skill set needed to be one of the most gifted scorers in the country immediately. The 6-foot-8 lefty has a slight build, but he can finish through contact and is a good perimeter shooter as well. Oubre also uses ball screens well, an attribute that was on display at the adidas Nations camp in August. Given the production Kansas lost on the wing in the form of Andrew Wiggins, Oubre will have plenty of chances to put points on the board.

source: AP
Rondae Hollis-Jefferson

5. Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, Arizona: Hollis-Jefferson is one of the best on-ball defenders in the country, and he was very good around the basket as a freshman. The question for Hollis-Jefferson (9.1 ppg, 5.7 rpg in 2013-14) is a simple one: how much has he improved his perimeter shooting over the summer? Hollis-Jefferson showed progress in July at the Lebron camp, and a consistent perimeter shot would make him an even tougher player for opponents to defend.

6. Treveon Graham, VCU: The 6-foot-6 senior has been a consistently productive player for Shaka Smart throughout his career, averaging 15.5 points, 7.0 rebounds and 2.0 assists per game last season. Graham can certainly shoot the ball from the perimeter, but he’s good in the mid-range game and can put the ball on the deck as well. He’ll be one of the leaders for a team expected by many to win the Atlantic 10.

7. Justin Jackson, North Carolina: The third freshman in the top ten, the 6-foot-8 Jackson can score both inside and out for the Tar Heels in 2014-15. As a high school senior Jackson averaged 31.5 points, 9.1 rebounds and 2.0 assists per game, and his length makes him a nuisance on the defensive end of the floor.

8. Aaron White, Iowa: With Roy Devyn Marble having moved on, the 6-foot-8 White will be an even more important player for the Hawkeyes in 2014-15. As a junior White averaged 12.8 points and 6.7 rebounds per game, shooting 58.6% from the field. The loss of Marble should open up more opportunities for White, especially when it comes to the mid-range game where he was so successful a season ago.

9. Branden Dawson, Michigan State: Dawson’s had to navigate injuries for most of his career in East Lansing, but there should be little doubt regarding his skill level. Last season Dawson averaged 11.2 points and 8.3 rebounds per contest, and given the amount of production the Spartans lost (Keith Appling, Gary Harris and Adreian Payne) the senior will need to be even more influential on the offensive end.

10. Wesley Saunders, Harvard: Saunders is one of the leaders for the Crimson, having averaged 14.2 points, 4.6 rebounds and 3.8 assists per game as a junior. Saunders’ versatility is one of his greatest attributes, and he’s also done a good job of getting to the foul line in each of the last two seasons.


  • 11. Anthony Brown, Stanford
  • 12. Justise Winslow, Duke
  • 13. Winston Shepard III, San Diego State
  • 14. Sindarius Thornwell, South Carolina
  • 15. Bryce Dejean-Jones, Iowa State
  • 16. Sam Thompson, Ohio State
  • 17. Dustin Hogue, Iowa State
  • 18. Theo Pinson, North Carolina
  • 19. Kyle Collinsworth, BYU
  • 20. Anthony Drmic, Boise State

ALSO CONSIDERED: Justin Anderson (Virginia), Patricio Garino (George Washington), Vince Hunter (UTEP), Nick King (Memphis), Justin Martin (SMU), Sheldon McClellan (Miami), Larry Nance Jr. (Wyoming), Le’Bryan Nash (Oklahoma State), Marcus Thornton (Georgia), Tyrone Wallace (California), Byron Wesley (Gonzaga).

Top 25 Countdown: No. 17 Iowa State Cyclones

Georges Niang (Getty Images)
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Beginning on October 3rd and running up until November 14th, the first day of the season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2014-2015 NBCSports.com college hoops preview package. We continue our countdown today with No. 17 Iowa State.

MORE: 2014-2015 Season Preview Coverage | NBCSports Preseason Top 25 | Preview Schedule

source: AP
Fred Hoiberg (AP Photo)

Head Coach: Fred Hoiberg

Last Season: 28-8, 11-7 Big 12 (t-3rd)

Key Losses: Melvin Ejim, Deandre Kane

Newcomers: Bryce Dejean-Jones (transfer), Abdel Nader (transfer), Jameel McKay (transfer), Clayton Custer, Georgis Tsalmpouris

Projected Lineup

G: Monte Morris, So.
G: Bryce Dejean-Jones, Sr.
G: Naz Long, Jr.
F: Dustin Hogue, Sr.
F: Georges Niang, Jr.
Bench: Abdel Nader, Jr.; Matt Thomas, So.; Jameel McKay, Jr.; Georgis Tsalmpouris, Fr.; Clayton Custer, Fr.

They’ll be good because … : This is precisely the kind of roster that Fred Hoiberg always has success with. They have the matchup nightmare in Georges Niang, who has lost 25 pounds and may be the single-toughest player to guard in all of college basketball this season. They have a seemingly endless supply of big guards that can knock down threes — Naz Long, Matt Thomas, Abdel Nader, Bryce Dejean-Jones. They have Dustin Hogue, an uber-athletic combo-forward that should do a decent job filling the role vacated by Melvin Ejim. And they have Monte Morris, a sophomore point guard that should have a big year handling the primary point guard duties.

Hoiberg has the athletes that will allow him to get up and down the floor and the shooters that will allow him to spread things out offensively. No coach in the country is better than Hoiberg at drawing up sets that will put his players in a position to succeed, where they can capitalize on their strengths and take advantage of mismatches. Throw in the aura of playing in Hilton Coliseum — Hilton Magic is real, ladies and gentlemen — and the Cyclones will once again be one of the most entertaining teams in the country to watch.

Georges Niang (Getty Images)

But they might disappoint because … : There are a couple of things that concern me about the Cyclones this season, so I’ll just go ahead and lay them out in bullet points:

  • Defense: The Cyclones have never been known for their defensive ability under Fred Hoiberg — they’ve yet to finish a season ranked in KenPom’s top 50 defensively — which should always be a concern.
  • Bryce Dejean-Jones: This is less of a concern than it is a question mark. BDJ built a reputation for being too much of a gunner during his time at UNLV and USC. I’d bet on Hoiberg getting through to him — he’s batting about 1.000 on transfers in his Iowa State tenure — but until we see it happen, it’s a red flag.
  • Too much Hilton Magic?: Hilton Coliseum is one of the best home courts in the country, but I always get a bit worried by teams that are dominant in their own gyms and struggle on the road. I know, the NCAA tournament is never a road game, but it’s also not a home game, either.

Outlook: With all due respect to Mike Krzyzewski and Tom Izzo and Bill Self and all the other usual suspects when naming the best coaches in the college game, I’m not sure there is a better x’s-and-o’s coach in the country than Fred Hoiberg. There’s a reason that he’s targeted by many NBA teams every offseason, and it’s not because he had a silky jumper when he was still playing.

Simply put, the man knows how to put his players in a position to succeed, particularly on the offensive end of the floor. He also has a proven track record when it comes to getting the best out of players that are on their second, and sometimes third, chance. I had doubts about the Cyclones heading into last season and they went on to finish third in the Big 12 and reach the Sweet 16. I had doubts about Iowa State the year before that and they finish fourth in the conference and came within an Aaron Craft three of reaching the Sweet 16. I had doubts the year Royce White was on the roster, and the Cyclones won 12 Big 12 games.

I have doubts about this year’s team, more than some of the teams that I have ranked lower than No. 17. But I’ve reached the point where I’ll trust that Fred Hoiberg finds a way to make everything fit together.

Monte Morris and the sophomore leap

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Next season will be a unique one for Iowa State coach Fred Hoiberg — it will be the first year the offense will be orchestrated by a guard recruited to Ames by Hoiberg. Sure, he has had some fine guards, including Diante Garrett, Royce White, Chris Allen, Korie Lucious, and DeAndre Kane, but that sextet were either leftovers from the previous coaching staff or transfers convinced Iowa State was the best place to continue their careers. What Hoiberg hasn’t done, and what he will accomplish in 2014-15, is having recruited a guard from high school with the specific purpose of playing the point.

When Monte Morris arrived on campus, he was clearly overlooked in favor of the expectations set for Matt Thomas, a Cyclone newbie who was expected to shine from day one, yet Morris has developed into one of the Big 12’s top guards. Consider that on a team with Melvin Ejim, the conference’s player of the year, Georges Niang, and Kane, Morris’ offensive rating led the squad. When Morris was ushered into the starting lineup, ISU went 13-4, and the evolution of his game and understanding of how to run an offense allowed the other four Cyclones to execute their offense unburdened with trying to set up teammates — Morris would find whichever Cyclone was open at the right moment.

Travis Hines of the Ames Tribune notes Morris’ assist to turnover ratio set an NCAA record, but what is truly impressive is during that seventeen game stretch, Morris only recorded 17 turnovers (while notching two games with double-digit assists).

Can Morris continue to build off his frosh season? Hoiberg certainly had a rebuilding job when he began this current season, and that job will be tenfold in 2014-15. The return of Niang should help, as will the improvement of Thomas, Naz Long, and Dustin Hogue, but an expectation that must be fulfilled should ISU enjoy another 20-plus win season is the expansion of Morris’ offense. Deferring to teammates propelled the Cyclones in 2014, but Morris will have to shoulder a great percentage of the offense in 2015, but if his shooting is any indication — 41 percent from beyond the arc — Morris has the ability to be an scoring juggernaut.