Doral Moore

(Kelly Kline/Under Armour)

Wake Forest lands commitment from four-star seven-footer

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Danny Manning has landed his second four-star recruit in his first recruiting class at Wake Forest, as 7-foot-1 center Doral Moore pledged to the Demon Deacons early on Wednesday morning.

The news was first reported by Rivals.com.

The fit couldn’t be more perfect for Moore. At this stage in his career, he’s a center with loads of potential that still has a long way to go in his development. He’s got broad shoulders and long arms, making him an excellent shot-blocker at this stage in his development, and he’s also developed a nice touch on his shot. He needs to become more aggressive and confident in the post, and adding strength certainly would help him along the way, but the good news is that Moore just committed to one of the best coaches in the country when it comes to developing big men.

This commitment is a bit of a coup for Manning, as Moore, who ranks as the No. 48 player in the class of 2015, had recently cut his list to five schools: Kentucky, Florida, Ohio State, Illinois and Wake Forest.

Moore joins four-star guard Bryant Crawford in Manning’s 2015 class.

College Basketball Talk’s Recruiting Roundup

(Kelly Kline/Under Armour)
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(Kelly Kline/Under Armour)

Each Monday and Friday, College Basketball Talk’s Scott Phillips goes over some important news and notes in the world of college basketball recruiting. This week, Doral Moore takes an official visit to Kentucky, Texas A&M’s pipeline to the Texas Titans and do-it-all utility wing Chris Clarke cuts his list to seven.

Doral Moore visiting Kentucky

Kentucky will host a big official visit this weekend when Georgia native and 7-footer Doral Moore trips to Lexington. Moore doesn’t have the five-star rating of many of his Class of 2015 front court counterparts, coming in at No. 38 according to Rivals, but the thing you have to like about Moore is his upside is as high as many big man in the class. With great natural size, good touch around the basket and in the mid-range and length under the hoop that helps him as a shot blocker, Moore has a chance to improve greatly once he gets to college and gets in a weight room.

And while the Wildcats might actually have too many quality big men this season, many of them could leave for the NBA or for more playing time at the end of the season and Moore could use a year or two of seasoning before earning quality rotation minutes inside.

With John Calipari’s recent track record with Willie Cauley-Stein — who was also not a five-star big man as a high schooler and got better in college as a late-blooming 7-footer — Moore could be attracted to the chance to be Kentucky’s next project in the post.

Texas A&M continues Texas Titans pipeline

On Friday afernoon Tyler Davis commitmented to Texas A&M, according to Scout.com’s Evan Daniels. The commitment of the No. 35 player in the class, according to Rivals, and a 6-foot-9 center is significant in a number of ways. For one, the Aggies are getting a massive post scorer with good hands and feet who is a load to move off of the block. Kennedy getting a potential McDonald’s All-American in a class loaded with elite big men is a great start in the Class of 2015.

But another reason Davis’ commitment is big for head coach Billy Kennedy is it continues to the Texas Titans-to-Texas A&M pipeline that has developed in recent years.

The Aggies pulled in a pair of point guards from the Titans in the 2014 class in Alex Robinson and Avery Johnson Jr., and now they have started their 2015 efforts with a Titans big man in Davis.

The Titans have been one of the more successful grassroots programs in recent years and Davis, along with Texas A&M targets D.J. Hogg and Mickey Mitchell, have played with Robinson and Johnson Jr. the last two years in the EYBL. The Titans made Peach Jam in both years and the group plays well together while also being tight-knit.

As Rivals’ Eric Bossi noted on Twitter, the Aggies are getting some buzz now for both Hogg and Mitchell, who decommitted from Ohio State last night. If Kennedy can keep that pipeline open, it would be greatly beneficial, because the Titans are usually stocked with some talented players while the coaching staff there does a good job of developing players.

2015 wing Chris Clarke down to seven

One of the best winners in the class is do-it-all small forward and Class of 2015 top-100 player Chris Clarke. The 6-foot-6 Clarke had a really good summer with Boo Williams and helped the team make the EYBL final four this year.

Now, the native of Virginia has formed a list of seven, according to Corey Evans. Clarke is down to Creighton, Florida, Iowa State, Minnesota, Tennessee, UConn and Virginia Tech.

It will be interesting to see if Clarke opts to stay home and play for Buzz Williams at Virginia Tech, as Williams and staff relentlessly followed Clarke in July. Rivals puts Clarke at No. 64 in their current 2015 rankings.

UAA The Finals Thursday Recap: Josh Jackson vs. Jaylen Brown highlights the day

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SUWANEE, Ga. — The highlight of Thursday’s action at the Under Armour Association’s final summer tournament, The Finals, was a matchup between Jaylen Brown, the No. 3 recruit in the Class of 2015, and Josh Jackson, the No. 1 recruit in the Class of 2016.

The gym was packed with coaches to see a battle between arguably the two best wings in high school basketball regardless of age group, and the pair did not fail to disappoint.

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Kelly Kline/Under Armour

Brown was on fire early, hitting four catch-and-shoot threes from four different spots on the floor in the first half, finishing with 18 points as his Game Elite team jumped out to a big lead over Jackson’s 1 Nation squad. It was clear early on that Jackson was pressing — his team did not have as much talent on the roster as Brown’s — and it manifested himself as tough shots, quick threes and an early benching.

Late in the first half, Jackson began to assert his will on the game. He made a handful of beautiful passes in transition, he started making his presence felt on the glass and he even had a LeBron-esque chasedown block. In the end, Brown won the scoring battle — he finished with 26 points while Jackson had 14 — but Jackson’s team got the win in the end as Jackson played a better overall game in the second half.

It was an odd way for things to end. Jackson is generally known as the better perimeter scorer, a smooth athlete that can get buckets at all three levels while finding assists and contributing on the glass. He did most of his damage in the paint on Thursday, while Brown — whose reputation is of that as a more physical, interior player developing his perimeter game — did most of his damage from beyond the arc.

At the end of the day, both Brown and Jackson did exactly what the AAU trail is designed for: they both played well in front of coaches like Roy Williams, John Calipari, Bill Self, Mark Fox and Steve Alford.

Keep an eye on Darius Perry: While the stars of the show were Brown and Jackson — and to a lesser extent Stanford commit Marcus Sheffield and Pitt commit Damon Wilson — 2017 shooting guard Darius Perry proved himself to be a name to be watched. He knocked down a trio of catch-and-shoot threes, two from well-beyond the three-point line, and also hit a mid-range pull-up jumper from the foul line.

Diamond Stone also plays well: I caught Stone’s final game of the day, as he squared off with Penn State-commit Mike Watkins and put together the most impressive performance that I have seen from the big man to date. He knocked down a couple of trail-threes from the top of the key, make a couple of plays around the rim and had one startling crossover that led to a dunk over Watkins in a half-court possession.

Stone, who is ranked No. 6 in the Class of 2015 by Rivals, did not have an overly impressive performance in Philly last week for the Breakout Classic, but certainly made his presence known on Thursday. The Wisconsin-native has made a point to try and show off his perimeter ability this July, which is frustrating and promising at the same time: he does appear to be getting better with his ability to shoot the ball and face opponents up, but his biggest strength still lies in his back-to-the-basket game.

But hey, that’s really what AAU basketball is for, a chance for kids to try out moves they have been working on in games that, in all reality, don’t matter.

Chance Comanche vs. Doral Moore fizzles: The other elite big man matchup of Thursday came between Doral Moore, No. 38 in the Class of 2015, and Chance Comanche, No. 21 in the same class. Moore is the more physically imposing center of the two, but he has limited post moves and a motor that leaves much to be desired. He did show off his overwhelming ceiling with a massive dunk over Comanche in the second half.

To be fair, Comanche did not play all that well himself. He’s got a decent ability to finish in the post, a solid 15-footer and the length and athleticism to finish above the rim, particularly in transition, but he needs to add strength. He was a bit overwhelmed by the size of Moore and his front court mate, Tim Rowe.

Hoop Group Pitt Jam Fest Saturday: Tevin Mack outshines Seventh Woods

Seventh Woods (Kelly Kline, UA)
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Seventh Woods (Kelly Kline, UA)

PITTSBURGH, Pa. — When you talk about the Carolina Wolves, the first name that is going to be mentioned is Seventh Woods.

An electrifying athlete, Woods made waves last spring when a scintillating mixtape of his freshman season exploits went viral. He spent last summer playing in the U-16 World Championships with Team USA and shot up the Class of 2016 recruiting rankings, where Rivals currently ranks him No. 5 nationally.

But through three games at Hoop Group’s Pittsburgh Jam Fest, Woods has been an after thought on his own team as Tevin Mack has taken over. Mack is averaging 36.0 points in the three games, including a pair of 38 point performances on Saturday, making him by far the most productive scorer in the tournament.

“Best thing I do is shoot,” and Mack certainly showcased that skill in Pittsburgh. As a 6-foot-6 wing with a lengthy wingspan, Mack has the size to be able to take advantage of that shooting ability over smaller defenders. And while he’s more than just a spot-up shooter on the offensive end of the floor, part of the reason that he’s only ranked No. 97 in the Class of 2015 in Rivals top 150 is that he’s limited as an athlete and a ball-handler.

The good news?

Mack is aware of where his deficiencies lie. When asked what his goal is for this spring and summer, he said he wants to improving his “defense, ball-handling and getting more athletic.”

And if he does? “I’ll get my ranking up and show people I’m actually good.”

Georgia is considered the favorite to land Mack, as his family has a relationship with head coach Mark Fox from when his brother played for Fox at Nevada and Tevin has already made a couple of visits to the campus. But Mack, a native of Columbia, S.C., said that VCU recently extended an offer and that Clemson, Wake Forest, Southern Cal and South Carolina have shown interest in recent week.

“Stability in the program,” Mack said of what he’s looking for in a school. “The coaches that are recruiting me are going to be there the entire time. A winning program, but somewhere that I can make an impact.”

Mack shined, but Seventh Woods struggled: Woods did not have his most impressive performance in a pair of games on Saturday. He struggled with his perimeter stroke and committed a handful of unforced turnovers. His potential is evident to anyone that makes an effort to watch something as simple as layup lines, and Woods certainly has a knack for making some incredible plays on the defensive end of the floor. The problem? He seems to be trying to prove that he’s a point guard, facilitating offense and distributing the ball, which takes him out of what he does best: attacking the rim off the dribble. I’ll chalk this up as a bad day, so it will be interesting to see what kind of performance he has on Sunday.

Moustapha Heron shows out in front of Pitt fans: Heron is a beast, plain and simple. The 6-foot-5, 220 pound wing is an overpowering athlete that is strong enough to bully any wing that he will run into at the Pitt Jam Fest despite playing up an age group. Heron, the No. 19 recruit in the Class of 2016, showed off that physical prowess on Saturday, posting 27 points in a blow out win for his New Heights (NYC) over the very talented Team Thad. Panther fans would have a reason to get excited about Heron, who committed to Pitt last fall, if there wasn’t a concern that he will be reopening his recruitment soon. Barry “Slice” Rohrssen was the coach that recruited Heron, and Rohrssen left Jamie Dixon’s staff and accepted the same position with Kentucky last week.

Doral Moore’s post game is coming along: Like every lanky, athletic big man that comes through the high school ranks, Doral Moore has been an excellent shot blocker and finisher throughout his younger years. But the God-given ability to be seven-feet tall and able to dunk a basketball will only get a player so far if he can’t develop the rest of his game, and on Saturday, Moore showed off some of that development. He’s always had a soft touch on the perimeter, but Moore showed off a nice, right-handed jump hook as the Atlanta XPress advanced to Sunday’s quarterfinals. Given his length and athleticism, if Moore can perfect that shot, it can be unstoppable.

“Mostly my post-up game,” Moore said of what he’s been working the hardest on to develop. “I can shoot, but I have to get down and dirty sometimes. Finish strong.”

Moore is the highest-rated Class of 2015 prospect in Pittsburgh, ranking No. 16 on Rivals. He listed Illinois, Ohio State, Texas, Kentucky, Kansas, Indiana and Louisville.

Derrick Jones is still learning how to play: Derrick Jones will never lose a dunk contest.

Ever.

Period.

He’s the freakiest of freak athletes that you are going to come across. I’d give 5-to-1 odds that he’ll give himself a concussion by hitting his head on the rim at least once in his career, and the fact that he’s 6-foot-8 with long arms only makes him that much more impressive.

The issue is that the rest of his game is still developing. His ball-handling, his ability to shoot the ball, developing his slender frame. His ceiling is limitless, but he’s got a way to go before he reaches that ceiling. Until then, just don’t try to jump with him.