DeAndre Daniels

DeAndre Daniels

UConn junior forward DeAndre Daniels to enter NBA Draft

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UConn’s chances of repeating as national champions next season hinged, in part, on the decisions of guard Ryan Boatright and forward DeAndre Daniels. With both considering entering the 2014 NBA Draft, head coach Kevin Ollie would have more holes to fill with Shabazz Napier, Niels Giffey and Lasan Kromah out of eligibility if those two juniors were to leave.

And Friday afternoon it was learned that there will be one more hole to fill.

As first reported by Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo Sports that Daniels, whose improved play during the NCAA tournament made him a more enticing prospect to NBA scouts, has decided to forego his final season of eligibility and enter his name into the 2014 NBA Draft pool.

MOREThe list of players entering the 2014 NBA Draft

Daniels averaged 13.1 points and 6.0 rebounds per game as a junior, and in the NCAA tournament he found the level of consistency that wasn’t always there during the regular season. Daniels reached double figures in five of UConn’s six NCAA tournament wins, including a 27-point, ten-rebound performance in their Sweet 16 win over Iowa State.

Draft Express projects Daniels, who was one of the best high school players in his class back in 2011, to be a late-first round selection.

POSTERIZED: DeAndre Daniels puts one down on Kentucky (VIDEO)

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DeAndre Daniels put down a ferocious dunk the other night and he’s at it again in the opening minutes against Kentucky on Monday night.

The junior forward has had a very good tournament run so far for UConn entering Monday’s championship game against the Wildcats.

(H/T @gifdsports)

POSTERIZED: UConn’s DeAndre Daniels throws down on Florida defense (VIDEO)

DeAndre Daniels
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One of the key components of Florida’s vaunted defense, is the Gators ability to communicate and rotate. Not the case on this play. DeAndre Daniels found a cutting lane following an entry pass and rose up for a thunderous dunk to extend the UConn lead.

Daniels, who has been up-and-down in his time in Storrs, has shined this tournament, continuing that play on Saturday night at the Final Four.

Late Night Snacks: Sunday’s Elite 8 matchups set

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GAME OF THE NIGHT: No. 8 Kentucky 74, No. 4 Louisville 69

How does one pick a game of the night amongst a slate of four superiorly played contests? Each of Friday’s Sweet 16 games could have made this cut, but since John Calipari was able to snap Rick Pitino’s streak — prior to Friday, the Louisville coach was 11-0 in Sweet 16 match-ups — the Kentucky win gets top billing. The game did not start strongly for UK — Calipari said he knew his team would ‘pee down their legs‘ once the ball was tipped — and it appeared like Louisville, fueled by Russ Smith’s dunks, Luke Hancock taking each Wildcat off the dribble, and poor UK perimeter shooting, would make a consecutive Elite 8.

The play of Alex Poythress and Dakari Johnson, two of the less hyped UK bigs, helped balance the squad until UK could make its run late in the second half. Johnson scored 15 points and grabbed six boards, and Poythress, in particular, changed the contest’s dynamic — without his defensive intensity, which included forcing a Hancock steal and blocking Smith on an open court attempt, UK likely wouldn’t be playing on Sunday.


1) No. 7 Connecticut 81, No. 3 Iowa State 76: Until just over two minutes remained in the second half, Connecticut, whose fans packed Madison Square Garden like it was the Big East Tournament and Jim Calhoun was still on the sidelines, was in complete control. At that point, Iowa State was somehow awoken from their game-long stupor and began a too late charge. ISU junior Dustin Hogue put in some serious work, scoring a career-high 34 points (he made 15 out of 19 shots), and DeAndre Daniels was the game’s other DeAndre (as opposed to Kane), splashing the net with crucial jump shots (he finished with 27 points).

2) No. 2 Michigan 73, No. 11 Tennessee 71: When discussing this Sweet 16 tilt years from now, the charging foul on UT’s Jarnell Stokes will be the evergreen moment, while Caris LeVert’s swiping Stokes will be lost as memories fade. The Vols simply could not handle Michigan’s offensive fortitude in the first half, yielding 1.45 points per possession from countless jumpers off flare screens. A combination of tighter defense and careless Michigan turnovers kept this game much closer than the first half would have indicated, and the Wolverines, along with their electric and dynamic scoring, will next face Kentucky.

3) No. 4 Michigan State 80, No. 1 Virginia 78: This game had the feel of being played in a cramped, stuffy sweatbox that only seats a few hundred. It certainly didn’t feel like Madison Square Garden — for much of the second half, fans were standing, refusing to sit for fear of missing the back-and-forth shooting display. The Cavaliers’ pack-line defense was true to form — the duo of Gary Harris and Keith Appling were rendered ineffective, converting just three of eight field goals — but UVa had no match for Branden Dawson, a junior who overpowered (24 points, ten rebounds) the entirety of the Cavs’ frontcourt.


1) Branden Dawson, Michigan State: The junior big’s game against Virginia was spectacular, but his play throughout the NCAA tournament is noteworthy: through three games, Dawson is making nearly 60 percent of his twos, grabbing 19 defensive boards, and committing just two turnovers.

2) Alex Poythress, Kentucky: The sophomore only scored six points and grabbed four rebounds against Louisville, but without his defense late in the second half, UK would have likely been the twelfth team on Pitino’s Sweet 16 streak.

3) Jordan Morgan, Michigan : A picture of Morgan was published this week in the Detroit Free-Press, showcasing his transformation from a freshman to senior, and the big looks positively Gaston-esque. That buff physique helped Morgan handle the Vols’ burly interior, and combined with a thorough scouting report, put Morgan in the position to draw the defensive play of the game.


1) Willie Cauley-Stein’s ankle: Following the win, Calipari said his center’s ankle injury was “…not a good ankle injury.” It would be very surprising if Cauley-Stein played on Sunday against Michigan, but he could undergo a miraculous turnaround within the next 24 hours.

2) Michigan State’s backcourt: Harris, Appling, and Denzel Valentine combined to make just four field goals against a stout Cavalier defense.

3) Iowa State’s seniors: This isn’t how the Cyclones 2014 season should have ended. After helping to carry the team throughout the year, Melvin Ejim and DeAndre Kane suffered their worst offensive outing in ’14 — Kane was two of nine from the free throw line (he normally makes 63 percent of his free throws), and Ejim converted just three out of thirteen field goals.

The other DeAndre (Daniels) steals the show as No. 7 UConn beats No. 3 Iowa State

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NEW YORK — When you think of UConn, you think of Shabazz Napier.

That’s what happens when you’re the star point guard, the first-team all-american for a program known for churning out first-team all-americans. That’s not unexpected when you play the same position — and spark a similar postseason run — as Kemba Walker, the most popular UConn Husky of the last decade.

And Shabazz did was Shabazz is wont to do on Friday night. He hit four threes in the first 10 minutes of the first game at Madison Square Garden since 1961, sparking a first half run that gave the Huskies control early in a game was was never much in doubt in the second half. No. 7 seed UConn advanced with a 81-76 win over No. 3 Iowa State.

But that wasn’t the difference in this game.

DeAndre was, only it wasn’t the DeAndre we thought.

MORE: In the end, the loss of Georges Niang was too much to overcome

DeAndre Daniels, UConn’s enigmatic junior forward, scored 27 points, including 13 of UConn’s first 15 in the second half, and added ten boards and two blocks. He hit threes. He was beating Iowa State defenders off the dribble. He was the screener in UConn’s pick-and-roll action. And that’s before you factor in that he played a major roll in keeping Big 12 Player of the Year Melvin Ejim in check. He finished with just seven points and was 3-for-13 from the floor, although two of those field goals came in the final 30 seconds with the outcome already decided. DeAndre Kane, Iowa State’s star point guard and the hero of the Round of 32, had 16 points, nine assists and eight boards, but was just 6-for-18 from the floor.

“Deandre was kind of pressing [early],” Napier said. “He wanted to make a big impact, and I just told him, ‘Calm down, it’ll come to you’. Once he got the first one, we kept feeding him.”

“He got super hot, we had to cool his hand down.”

Iowa State head coach Fred Hoiberg agreed. “He was unbelievable tonight,” he said.

It wasn’t just Daniels that stepped up for the Huskies, either. Ryan Boatright scored 10 of his 14 points in the first half and added a pair of assists as well, one of which led to the biggest shot of the game. Iowa State had just cut the UConn lead to 67-63, the closest that the Cyclones had been since midway through the first half, when Boatright got into the paint and found Niels Giffey wide open in the corner.

Giffey buried the three, giving the Huskies a seven-point lead with less than two minutes left, and from that point forward all the Huskies needed to do was hit free throws to seal up the win.

They did.

And they’ll advance to the Elite 8 to play the winner of No. 1 Virginia and No. 4 Michigan State on Sunday evening at the Garden.

It’s a game they have a real chance to win, regardless of the opponent, if they can get this kind of an effort from Napier’s supporting cast. Napier can control a game as well as anyone in the country. I know that and you know that, which means that every coach in the country knows it as well. That also means that every game-plan will be built around trying to keep Napier in check. Iowa State didn’t do too bad, either.

Napier finished with 19 points, five boards and five assists, but he was just 5-for-11 from the floor and hit just a single field goal in the final 30 minutes while committing five turnovers.

“I’m the type of person that don’t look to the future to much,” Napier said. “I just look at what’s in front of me.”

And what’s in front of him now is a chance to play in the Final Four.

American Tournament: Role players help No. 21 UConn hold off No. 13 Cincinnati

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Throughout the season guards Shabazz Napier and Ryan Boatright have led the way for No. 21 UConn, with role players such as DeAndre Daniels and Niels Giffey chipping in when needed. And that has been the case at the American Athletic Conference tournament, with those role players making valuable contributions in wins over No. 19 Memphis and No. 13 Cincinnati.

In their 58-56 win over the Bearcats Giffey scored 11 points and Daniels added 14 to go along with nine rebounds, joining Napier (15 points) and Boatright (13) in double figures. Those four starters combined to score 53 of the Huskies’ 58 points, and with Cincinnati being as tough as they are defensively a two-man attack wasn’t going to get the job done.

UConn needed more and Giffey and Daniels stepped forward, moving the Huskies into Saturday’s title game against No. 5 Louisville.

Another key contributor for UConn was center Amida Brimah, who in 21 minutes of action scored four points, grabbed seven rebounds and blocked four shots. The freshman isn’t ready to be a marquee offensive option at this stage in his career but he has the ability to be the rim protector this group needs, and he filled that role opposite the conference’s Defensive Player of the Year in Cincinnati’s Justin Jackson.

Brimah’s presence contributed to one of UConn’s best defensive performances of the season, limiting the Bearcats to 37.9% shooting and leading scorer Sean Kilpatrick to 5-for-15 from the field. That defense helped the Huskies win despite being outscored 32-14 in the paint and 17-7 in points off of turnovers.

The turnover area is something UConn will have to clean up in order to beat Louisville, which is red-hot and swept the regular season series. Do that, and the Huskies will have a shot at winning the inaugural American tournament title. And if UConn’s role player can continue to supplement the efforts of their backcourt as they have this week, Kevin Ollie’s group is capable of making a run in the NCAA tournament.