Tag: Curtis Malone


Assigned Reading: The rise and fall of Curtis Malone

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For those who follow college basketball recruiting the name Curtis Malone is certain to register. As one of the founders of the D.C. Assault grassroots program, Malone’s sent many players to Division I schools, with some products even reaching the NBA, and he’s also had an impact on the hiring of multiple assistant coaches. But there were also issues, most notably a second drug-related conviction that resulted in his being sentenced to 100 months in federal prison in late-May.

Pete Thamel of Sports Illustrated penned a solid piece on Malone and the two lives he led: as one of the most powerful men in grassroots basketball and as a man making some $80,000 per month from the sale of cocaine and heroin. There won’t be too many stunning moments in the story for those who are familiar with Malone’s story, but it is an interesting read.

And despite the fact that Malone’s transgressions have landed him back in prison, there are those who hold onto the fact that Malone was able to help some who would have fallen through the cracks if not for his assistance.

Those around Malone say his benevolence extended beyond coaches and stars. Former Assault backup Devin Sweetney, who played at St. Francis (Pa.) from 2006 through 2010, says that Malone paid his mother’s $1,500 rent one month when she came up short and he also pushed him to improve his grades. “You’re not going to hear me say a bad thing about him,” says DeMatha Catholic High coach Mike Jones. “I know a lot of kids whom he’s really, really helped. Which makes the story that much sadder.”

The full feature on Malone can be read here.

D.C. Assault co-founder Curtis Malone sentenced to 100 months in federal prison

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Curtis Malone, the co-founder the well-known D.C. Assault AAU program, was sentenced on Wednesday morning to 100 months in federal prison on drug trafficking charges.

He had pleaded guilty to distributing cocaine and heroin back in March. That plea agreement meant he faced 5-10 years in prison. Malone was arrested last August, and was charged with conspiracy to distribute cocaine and heroin. This was part of a year-long DEA investigation. Malone was one of six co-defendants in the case.

From Mark Giannotto of the Washington Post:

“I’m standing in front of you with no excuses . . . I thought this was a quick way to fix the issue,” Malone said in his first extended public comments since being arrested last August. He then referenced the three months he spent in prison because of a 1990 conviction on charges of possession with the intent to distribute cocaine.

“Twenty years later,” Malone added. “I’m back to what got me in trouble before.”

West Virginia’s Bobby Huggins, Drexel’s Bruiser Flint and DeMatha Catholic High (Maryland) head coach Mike Jones each wrote a letter of support — there were 30 letters in total — the defense used as its argument for leniency, according to the Washington Post.

Over the years DC Assault produced players such as Michael Beasley, Keith Bogans, Nolan Smith, DerMarr Johnson and Jeff Green.

The program changed its name to DC Premier in September. It’s currently part of the Under Armour Association, holding an 8-2 record so far this spring.

Curtis Malone has bond denied, referred to as ‘large-scale supplier’ of narcotics

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Curtis Malone, the co-founder of the powerhouse DC Assault AAU program that produced such talents as Nolan Smith and Michael Beasley, had an appeal for bond denied by the U.S. District Court on Wednesday.

In the judge’s ruling, Malone was referred to as the “the principle character” and a “large-scale supplier” in a drug ring that could span the entire east coast.

Malone was arrested on August 9th on drug trafficking charges, and as his case slowly moves through D.C.’s court system, more information about just what he was involved in has started to leak out.

It reads like the plot of a season of The Wire, with Malone playing the role of Stringer Bell.

From this report by Mark Giannotto of the Washington Post:

In court proceedings Wednesday, assistant U.S. attorney Stephen Gripkey said Malone’s role in D.C. Assault was used as a disguise for his drug-trafficking activities. A wiretap on two of Malone’s phones revealed he used basketball apparel such as shoe brands and uniform sizes as code words for narcotics and money under aliases such as “White Boy” and “Daddy.”

During a search of Malone’s Upper Marlboro home on Aug. 9, police recovered one kilogram of cocaine, 84 grams of heroin, one .44-caliber semiautomatic handgun and paraphernalia associated with the distribution of controlled substances. They also seized one kilogram of cocaine and $20,000 in cash from co-defendant Stephen Williams after he emerged from Malone’s home that day.

There are plenty of other details in Giannotto’s story that will leave you questioning just how Malone was able to keep this quiet for so long. Like how Malone discovered an agent surveilling his house in February, or in June when he noticed that he had a tail on his way to a drug deal in Baltimore.

The program will be changing their name to the DC Premier, and with Malone forced to remain in jail, I think it’s safe to say that all ties have been cut between the program and it’s founder.