Tag: Brady Heslip

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Big 12 Tournament: Baylor lost, but the Bears are still dangerous

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Baylor’s legs finally gave out on them.

Playing their fourth game in four days after four weeks of what was essentially win-or-go-to-the-NIT-again basketball, you could also see the Bears tire down the stretch of their 74-65 loss to Iowa State in the finals of the Big 12 tournament.

After forcing the Cyclones to miss their first 13 shots of the game and taking a double-digit lead early in the first half, Baylor’s defense became a sieve, allowing the Cyclones to shoot 68.6% from the floor the rest of the way. It goes without saying that, for a team with some issues on the defensive end of the floor already, this was not one of their premier performances.

But that also doesn’t change the fact that Baylor has been playing some of the best basketball in the country over the last four weeks.

RELATED: Fred Hoiberg’s rebuilt Iowa State into a Final Four contender

Remember, this was a team that was 2-8 in the Big 12 heading into a February 12th game at TCU. They had lost eight of their last ten games and were on the wrong side of the bubble, but that win over TCU sparked a run. Baylor won seven of eight to close the regular season before knocking off TCU, Oklahoma and Texas en route to the Big 12 title game.

What has changed?

Well, for starters, Kenny Chery has played like one of the best point guards in the country ever since he snapped a three-game funk with a triple-double in the double-overtime win at Kansas State exactly one month ago. Brady Heslip refound his three-point stroke. Jefferson and Austin are finally playing like everyone expected them to play four months ago.

In other words, this group finally decided to play up to their potential.

And as a result, there is a chance that they could end up getting a No. 5 seed when the brackets are released.

Big 12 Tournament: Baylor advances to title game with sixth straight victory

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The early portion of Big 12 didn’t go well for the Baylor Bears, to say the least. At one point Scott Drew’s team lost five straight and seven of eight Big 12 contests, going from a team some thought to be a contender for the league title to one that looked destined to simply sit above TCU in the standings.

But there’s something to be said for a team that gets hot at the right time, and it’s clear that Baylor fits that description. The Bears have now won six in a a row and ten of their last 11 after whipping Texas 86-69 in a Big 12 semifinal Friday night. Brady Heslip shot 6-for-11 from beyond the arc and scored 24 points, leading four Bears in double figures.

As a team Baylor shot 12-for-24 from deep and 24-for-30 from the foul line, outscoring the Longhorns by 21 points from deep and 22 points from the charity stripe. And with their starting front court outplaying the Texas big men, Baylor led by 15 at the intermission and by as much as 24 in the second half.

Cory Jefferson racked up 20 points, 13 rebounds and three blocks, with both Isaiah Austin (ten points, five rebounds and seven blocks) and Royce O’Neale (eight points, ten rebounds) chipping in.

Another key for Baylor during this run has been the play of point guard Kenny Chery. Chery, the replacement for Pierre Jackson, has averaged 13.7 points, 3.6 rebounds and 5.8 assists during this 11-game stretch with all three averages being higher than his season averages.

One reason for Baylor’s struggles early in conference play was the strength of the Big 12, and when a team isn’t playing well in a conference that difficult issues have the potential to snowball. But instead of getting frustrated and splintering off, thus allowing the season to get away from them, Baylor tightened things up and continued to work. They’ve turned things around as a result, and now Baylor has the look of a team capable of winning multiple games next week.

Unless No. 12 Baylor’s defense improves, they’re not a Big 12 contender

Baylor  v Texas Tech
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Jaye Crockett led five players in double figures with 19 points for Texas Tech as the Red Raiders blew out No. 12 Baylor at home.

The final score was 82-72, but trust me when I tell you, that doesn’t do the beatdown justice. It took 30 minutes for the Bears to show up on Wednesday night, and by then they were already down 20 points. Tech was up 43-22 at the half, having held Baylor to 7-for-27 shooting. Baylor didn’t have an assist in the first 20 minutes.

Tubby Smith’s boys deserve all the credit in the world. They came out and simply out-worked the Bears. Baylor looked half-asleep in the first half, which is something that can happen on the road in league play, and the Red Raiders took advantage.

But the bigger concern for Baylor is that this may not have simply been a bad outing.

The Bears haven’t done much of anything since beating Kentucky on December 6th. Part of that was their schedule. Like any other coach in the country, Scott Drew went ahead and put together a December full of cupcakes. The Bears had beaten Colorado and Kentucky and finished in second place in the Maui Invitational in November, looking every bit the part of a top 15 team that could compete for the Big 12.

But during that month long sabbatical from quality competition, the Bears seem to have lost their rhythm. They were run off the floor at Iowa State last week, with nothing but a blowout home win over TCU in between the two losses.

Here’s the question I have: can their issues actually be corrected? The concerns for Baylor entering the season were in their back court, but Kenny Chery has been a revelation while Brady Heslip is back to being one of the nation’s most fearsome snipers. Throw in the recent performances from Taurean Prince, and the Bears have plenty of weapons on the perimeter.

The issue is that Baylor’s front line was supposed to be one of the best in the country, but it has disappointed all season long. Isaiah Austin is a better shot-blocker than he was as a freshman, but the rest of his numbers are significantly down from a year ago. Cory Jefferson is still doing what he does, but he’s at his best in a complimentary role. He’s not a focal point as a low-post scorer, he’s a rebounder that will throw down a couple of thunderous dunks a night.

What’s worse is that despite having those two — plus one of the nation’s best rebounders in Rico Gathers — the Bears are still getting waxed on the defensive glass. I get it, they play a lot of zone and rebounding is difficult to do out of a zone, but it’s still unacceptable for the nation’s second-best offensive-rebounding team to fail to corral more than 32% of the available defensive rebounds.

In fact, the Bears simply are not a good defensive team. Before giving up 82 points to Texas Tech, they ranked outside the top 100 in defensive efficiency, according to Kenpom. They don’t force turnovers, they can’t end possessions by getting defensive rebounds, and they’re struggling to defend the three this season.

Unless the Bears make some serious strides on the defensive end of the floor, this quite simply is not a team that can be put in the same sentence as Kansas, Oklahoma State and Iowa State.