Anthony Brown

Johnny Dawkins and Chasson Randle, Getty Images

Stanford’s Chasson Randle continues to grow as a point guard, leader

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source: AP
Senior PG Chasson Randle is on the Cousy Award watch list (AP Photo)

Beginning on October 3rd and running up until November 14th, the first day of the season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2014-2015 college hoops preview package.

MORE: 2014-2015 Season Preview Coverage | NBCSports Preseason Top 25 | Preview Schedule

After playing off the ball for the majority of his first two seasons at Stanford, Chasson Randle made the shift over into the point guard role. In one aspect the circumstances surrounding the Cardinal in 2013-14 made the move a necessity, with Aaron Bright being sidelined by a shoulder injury that would ultimately cost him the entire year (he’s now a grad transfer at Saint Mary’s). Add in the fact that Stanford didn’t have much experience at the position, and moving Randle to the point made sense.

The other aspect to be considered in all of this: while recruiting Randle during his time playing for the Rock Island High (Illinois) and Illinois Wolves AAU programs, Dawkins and his staff saw skills they believed would ultimately lead to Randle moving to the point during his time in college.

“We thought he’d be able to eventually transition to the point guard spot,” Dawkins told last week. “Of course size-wise he was there, and he showed some instincts with his passing that led us to believe that he could make that transition. And I think that for his future, he knew that [position] was where his future lay if he wanted to continue to play the sport after college.”

And the thought of his basketball future after college influenced Randle as he worked to develop into a better player.

“Absolutely,” Randle told when asked if it was a move he had in mind before even setting foot on campus. “I knew that for my development and career that I had to develop my skills as a point guard. Coach Dawkins and his staff have done a great job with me and have been very patient throughout the years in teaching me what it takes to play the position, how to manage a game and become that leader on the floor.”

The decision proved to be a profitable one for both the individual and the team, with Randle raising his scoring average by five points per game and the Cardinal reaching the Sweet 16 after going six years without an NCAA tournament appearance. Randle averaged 18.8 points, 3.6 rebounds and 2.1 assists per game for Stanford, earning first team All-Pac-12 honors. Randle was one of two Stanford guards to take big steps forward in 2013-14 with the Pac-12’s Most Improved Player Anthony Brown being the other, and their return is a major reason why the Cardinal are expected to contend in the Pac-12 this season.

CLICK HERE to read’s Pac-12 Preview

When asked where he felt he made the greatest improvements as the season progressed, Randle cited leadership and his ability to manage the game.

Stanford seniors Chasson Randle and Anthony Brown (AP Photo)

“Just knowing time and score, and how to manage a game,” Randle said. “Slowing guys down when we need to slow down, and speeding things up where we need to go faster. Tempo was something I became better at controlling last year. This year, in terms of my growth, it’s going to be about picking my spots and knowing when to hunt my shot and when to find the open guy and getting others involved.”

Interestingly enough Randle’s assist numbers dropped from his sophomore to junior season, an occurrence that can be attributed to two factors. One was that in addition to being the team’s primary ball-handler, Randle was asked to be the primary scoring option for the Cardinal. The other factor: he wasn’t the only player on the roster capable of making plays within the Stanford offense, with three of Stanford’s five starters averaging between 2.1 and 3.1 assists per game.

The assist leader was forward Dwight Powell, and the departure of both he and Josh Huestis has undeniably impacted the next stage of Randle’s development as a point guard.

Randle’s responsibilities as a team leader take on even greater importance as a result of those two departures, with he, Brown and fellow senior Stefan Nastic being asked to shepherd a group of underclassmen that’s long on talent but short on college experience. With that being the case, Randle’s made a greater effort during the preseason to be a vocal leader and help the young guys out, as they’re (especially freshman point guard Robert Cartwright) the ones who will be entrusted with leading the program when Randle and his fellow seniors move on in the spring.

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“I have to be more of a vocal leader than ever,” Randle noted. “Dwight and Josh weren’t ‘super vocal’ but together they were just what we needed from a vocal standpoint. This year that’s where I need to come in and be that rock, someone the guys can depend on. And when things need to be said or done, I’ll need to be the guy who steps up.”

Offensively Stanford finished the season in the middle of the Pac-12 in both field goal (sixth) and three-point percentage (fifth), and they were just tenth in the conference in assists per game (11.5). Those numbers will need to improve if the Cardinal are to make consecutive NCAA tournament appearances for the first time since 2007 and 2008. Their crop of freshmen, which includes Cartwright, forwards Reid Travis and Michael Humphrey and shooting guard Dorian Pickens, will give the Cardinal added depth as will Rosco Allen’s return to the court after sitting out all of last season.

But those players will only go as far as the seniors, most notably Brown and Randle, can lead them. And in the case of Randle, his preparations to eventually play the point guard position have also provided valuable lessons learned in leadership. Having taken a step forward in that area a season ago, Randle has continued to build on that in hopes of putting together a successful senior campaign.

“The greatest strides he’s made have been as a leader,” Dawkins said. “He’s capable of scoring, but he had to improve as a leader and learn to be a little more vocal. I saw signs of that last year, and I continue to see signs that he’s taken that to another level this year. He’s communicating even better with his teammates, and that’s something that’s very important at the position.

“You have to make sure your teammates are organized, and that something I see Chasson doing a lot more.”

2014-2015 Season Preview: Stanley Johnson, Sam Dekker lead wing forward rankings

Stanley Johnson (Arizona Athletics)
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source: Getty Images
Sam Dekker (Getty Images)

Beginning on October 3rd and running up until November 14th, the first day of the season, College Basketball Talk will be unveiling the 2014-2015 college hoops preview package.

MORE: 2014-2015 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule

The wing position in college basketball this season will be fun to keep track of. It can be argued that from a depth standpoint this is the strongest position for incoming freshmen, with two players expected to be NBA Draft lottery selections in the near future and others expected to have a significant impact on their team’s fortunes. But there are also skilled veterans among the ranks, including one who reached the Final Four last season and another whose team fell one win short of that goal. What’s the common bond amongst many of these players? Versatility, which allows them to impact games in multiple facets.

Below are some of the best wings in college basketball this season, beginning with a gifted freshman from the Pac-12.

POSITION RANKINGS: Lead Guards | Off Guards | Wing Forwards | Big Men


1. Stanley Johnson, Arizona: Johnson has the build of a pro and the skill set to match, as he’s capable of scoring at all three levels with great consistency. He’s no slouch on the defensive end either, which is key when fitting into what was one of the nation’s best defensive teams a season ago. In a season without a clear-cut choice for national Player of the Year, Arizona’s freshman wing could be right in the mix come March.

2. Sam Dekker, Wisconsin: Dekker went from reserve to starter in 2013-14 and his productivity was one reason for the Badgers’ trek to the Final Four. Dekker averaged 12.9 points and 6.1 rebounds per game, shooting nearly 47 percent from the field. If he can raise his three-point shooting back to freshman year levels (39.1%), and he looked better shooting the ball at the LeBron James Skills Academy in July, Dekker becomes an even tougher assignment for opposing teams.

3. Delon Wright, Utah: The late Bum Phillips’ words regarding Earl Campbell may apply to Wright when it comes to discussing the most versatile players in college basketball: “he may not be in a class by himself, but it don’t take long to call roll.” Wright (15.5 ppg, 6.8 rpg, 5.3 apg) was a pivotal figure for the Utes in 2013-14, leading the team in scoring and assists. It could be argued that Wright should be on the lead guards list given how often he’s allowed to initiate the offense for Larry Krystkowiak’s team, but he fits in at any of the three perimeter positions.

4. Kelly Oubre, Kansas: One of three freshmen to make the top ten in our list, Oubre has the skill set needed to be one of the most gifted scorers in the country immediately. The 6-foot-8 lefty has a slight build, but he can finish through contact and is a good perimeter shooter as well. Oubre also uses ball screens well, an attribute that was on display at the adidas Nations camp in August. Given the production Kansas lost on the wing in the form of Andrew Wiggins, Oubre will have plenty of chances to put points on the board.

source: AP
Rondae Hollis-Jefferson

5. Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, Arizona: Hollis-Jefferson is one of the best on-ball defenders in the country, and he was very good around the basket as a freshman. The question for Hollis-Jefferson (9.1 ppg, 5.7 rpg in 2013-14) is a simple one: how much has he improved his perimeter shooting over the summer? Hollis-Jefferson showed progress in July at the Lebron camp, and a consistent perimeter shot would make him an even tougher player for opponents to defend.

6. Treveon Graham, VCU: The 6-foot-6 senior has been a consistently productive player for Shaka Smart throughout his career, averaging 15.5 points, 7.0 rebounds and 2.0 assists per game last season. Graham can certainly shoot the ball from the perimeter, but he’s good in the mid-range game and can put the ball on the deck as well. He’ll be one of the leaders for a team expected by many to win the Atlantic 10.

7. Justin Jackson, North Carolina: The third freshman in the top ten, the 6-foot-8 Jackson can score both inside and out for the Tar Heels in 2014-15. As a high school senior Jackson averaged 31.5 points, 9.1 rebounds and 2.0 assists per game, and his length makes him a nuisance on the defensive end of the floor.

8. Aaron White, Iowa: With Roy Devyn Marble having moved on, the 6-foot-8 White will be an even more important player for the Hawkeyes in 2014-15. As a junior White averaged 12.8 points and 6.7 rebounds per game, shooting 58.6% from the field. The loss of Marble should open up more opportunities for White, especially when it comes to the mid-range game where he was so successful a season ago.

9. Branden Dawson, Michigan State: Dawson’s had to navigate injuries for most of his career in East Lansing, but there should be little doubt regarding his skill level. Last season Dawson averaged 11.2 points and 8.3 rebounds per contest, and given the amount of production the Spartans lost (Keith Appling, Gary Harris and Adreian Payne) the senior will need to be even more influential on the offensive end.

10. Wesley Saunders, Harvard: Saunders is one of the leaders for the Crimson, having averaged 14.2 points, 4.6 rebounds and 3.8 assists per game as a junior. Saunders’ versatility is one of his greatest attributes, and he’s also done a good job of getting to the foul line in each of the last two seasons.


  • 11. Anthony Brown, Stanford
  • 12. Justise Winslow, Duke
  • 13. Winston Shepard III, San Diego State
  • 14. Sindarius Thornwell, South Carolina
  • 15. Bryce Dejean-Jones, Iowa State
  • 16. Sam Thompson, Ohio State
  • 17. Dustin Hogue, Iowa State
  • 18. Theo Pinson, North Carolina
  • 19. Kyle Collinsworth, BYU
  • 20. Anthony Drmic, Boise State

ALSO CONSIDERED: Justin Anderson (Virginia), Patricio Garino (George Washington), Vince Hunter (UTEP), Nick King (Memphis), Justin Martin (SMU), Sheldon McClellan (Miami), Larry Nance Jr. (Wyoming), Le’Bryan Nash (Oklahoma State), Marcus Thornton (Georgia), Tyrone Wallace (California), Byron Wesley (Gonzaga).

Top 25 Countdown: No. 25 Stanford Cardinal

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All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2014-2015 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day. Today, we start off our Top 25 countdown with the No. 25 Stanford Cardinal.

MORE: 2014-2015 Season Preview Coverage | NBCSports Preseason Top 25 | Preview Schedule

source: Getty Images
Johnny Dawkins and Chasson Randle, Getty Images

Last Season: 23-13, 10-8 Pac-12 (t-3rd), lost in the Sweet 16

Head Coach: Johnny Dawkins

Key Losses: Dwight Powell (14.0 ppg, 6.9 rpg, 3.1 apg), Josh Huestis (11.2 ppg, 8.2 rpg, 1.9 bpg)

Newcomers: Reid Travis, Michael Humphrey, Robert Cartwright, Dorian Pickens

Projected Lineup

G: Chasson Randle, Sr.
G: Anthony Brown, Sr.
– F: Rosco Allen, So.
– F: Reid Travis, Fr.
– C: Stefan Nastic, Sr.
– Bench: Grant Verhoeven, Jr.; Marcus Allen, So.; Malcolm Allen, So.; Robert Cartwright, Fr.; Michael Humphrey, Fr.; Christian Sanders, So.

They’ll be good because …: Chasson Randle and Anthony Brown will give the Cardinal one of the best back courts in the country. Randle is a supremely underrated lead guard, a big-time scorer that will have to take on more of a playmaking role this season. Brown is a 6-foot-6 marksman that has a reputation for being one of the better perimeter defenders out west.

The combination of Randle and Brown will be the anchor for Stanford as they try to repeat last season’s run to the Sweet 16, but there will be a solid supporting cast around them as well. Stefan Nastic isn’t anything special, but he’s a fifth-year senior and a capable low-post scorer that stands 6-foot-11. He’s not going to be intimidated by anyone he goes up against in league play. He’ll be joined up front by talented freshmen Reid Travis and Michael Humphrey, redshirt sophomore Rosco Allen and junior Grant Verhoeven. Travis, an undersized power forward that is a monster on the glass, should step into the starting lineup from day one and replace the production provided by Josh Huestis last season.

The back court is not as deep, but freshman Robert Cartwright should provide minutes at to spell Randle and give him a chance to play off the ball as well. There’s a chance that Cartwright could end up taking over the starting point guard role by the end of the season. Sophomore twins Marcus and Malcolm Allen will both be available as well, and Dorian Pickens should be able to provide a scoring pop when he sees the floor. The x-factor will be Christian Sanders, who started four times as a freshman in 2012-2013 but is coming off of an injury that kept him out all of last season.

Chasson Randle and Anthony Brown, AP Photo

But they might disappoint because …: We know how good Randle and Brown are, but beyond that, there are a lot of question marks. That’s not to say Dawkins hasn’t accumulated talent — he has recruited well — it’s just that the supporting cast he has on his roster is quite unproven.

Nastic is solid, but he was the third option in Stanford’s front court last year, behind Dwight Powell and Huestis. Freshmen Travis, Humphrey and Cartwright are all four-star recruits, but it is hard to know just how effective freshmen are going to be in their first season on campus. Rosco Allen was a four-star recruit coming out of high school and started seven games as a freshman in 2012-2013, but he missed all of last season with an injury. Verhoeven and the Allen twins have never played major roles.

Outlook: The irony of last season’s run to the Sweet 16 is that before the season — and even entering the NCAA tournament, to a certain extent — there was a concern that Johnny Dawkins’ job could be on the line if he wasn’t able to make some noise. Last year was the most talented team that he has had in his tenure, and the Cardinal only managed a 10 seed in the dance.

While his job is no longer in jeopardy, it doesn’t change the fact that Dawkins has had a number of teams that have, for one reason or another, under-performed. On paper, the Cardinal look like a top five team in the Pac-12, but games aren’t played on paper. Are we pinning too much expectation on one weekend where Stanford played well last March? Maybe, but we’re willing to risk it knowing how good Randle is and assuming that Travis, as well as Cartwright and Humphrey, will be able to make major contributions immediately.

The Chase for 180: Karvel Anderson leads shorthanded Robert Morris to NEC crown

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Who is the best shooter in the country?

It’s a tough question to answer, isn’t it? Does being a “shooter” simply mean merely being a high-level marksman from beyond the arc? Can a player who thrives in the mid-range but rarely ventures out into three-point land be eligible? How heavily should we be valuing stats like efficiency and effective field goal percentage when taking all of this into account?

One number that we like to use is “180″. How do you become a 180 shooter? By shooting 50% or better from the field overall, 40% or better from three and at least 90% from the charity stripe. From this point forward we’ll track this until the end of the regular season, providing weekly updates as well as a look into how some of the nation’s best find (and connect on) their quality looks.

January proved to be a tough month for the Robert Morris Colonials from a personnel standpoint. Four players, most notably freshman Jeremiah Worthem, were suspended and forward Mike McFadden made the decision to leave the program. Add this to the late-December departure of junior guard Desjuan Newton, and Andy Toole’s team was effectively reduced to eight players for the remainder of the season.

For some teams this would be an excuse to crumble, to point to the lack of bodies as a suitable reason for their demise. But that wasn’t the case for Robert Morris, which made the adjustments needed to finish Northeast Conference with a 14-2 record and win the regular season title. Defensively the Colonials played an active 2-3 zone, getting after opponents while also looking to compensate for their lack of interior depth. As for the offense, guard Karvel Anderson and guard/forward Lucky Jones were asked to do more with the former separating himself as the NEC’s best player.

According to Ken Pomeroy’s numbers Anderson, voted NEC Player of the Year by the league’s coaches, finished the regular season with a shot percentage of 31.9%. And even with the responsibility to score (19.6 ppg) Anderson managed to shoot well from the field (51.4%) and from three (46.4%) while also making 81.4% of his shots from the foul line. And as he did last season, making just over 50% of his two-point jumpers per, Anderson’s performed well in the mid-range game by making 52.3% of those shots.

A difference for Anderson as a senior when compared to his numbers from a season ago: he’s getting to the rim at a higher clip. After attempting just 9.7% of his shots at the rim last season Anderson’s taken 16.6% of his shots around the basket, converting 66.2% of those looks. Last season, Anderson shot 58.6% at the rim. Anderson has clearly been the first name mentioned in opposing scouting reports, but that has done little to keep the guard from producing and helping lead the Colonials to the NEC regular season title.

The question now is whether or not he can do so three more times, thus leading Robert Morris to its first NCAA tournament appearance since 2010.

THE TOP TEN (Note: Players much be eligible to be ranked in FG%, 3PT% and FT%. And here’s a glossary that includes the stats you’ll see used in these posts. Tempo neutral numbers per

1) Jason Calliste (Oregon)
51.6% FG, 50.5% 3PT, 85.2% FT = 187.3
Shot %: 17.2
eFG %: 66.1
True shooting %: 71.6

2) Austin Tillotson (Colgate)
60.2, 50.7, 74.0 = 184.9
Shot %: 18.5
eFG %: 68.1
True shooting %: 69.8

3) Brett Olson (Denver)
47.9, 43.8, 91.8 = 183.5
Shot %: 21.8
eFG %: 58.2
True shooting %: 64.0

4) Doug McDermott (Creighton)
51.4, 43.6, 87.7 = 182.7
Shot %: 37.6
eFG %: 58.8
True shooting %: 63.7

5) Brenton Williams (South Carolina)
43.0, 42.6, 95.4 = 181.0
Shot %: 25.3
eFG %: 56.3
True shooting %: 62.7

6) Johnny Dee (San Diego)
43.7, 43.0, 93.9 = 180.6
Shot %: 29.5
eFG %: 54.3
True shooting %: 60.2

7) Anthony Brown (Stanford)
50.4, 48.5, 81.1 = 180.0
Shot %: 18.8
eFG %: 60.0
True shooting %: 64.4

8) Karvel Anderson (Robert Morris)
51.4, 46.4, 81.4 = 179.2
Shot %: 31.9
eFG %: 63.6
True shooting %: 65.6

9) Phil Forte III (Oklahoma State)
44.9, 45.4, 88.9 = 179.2
Shot %: 22.2
eFG %: 62.2
True shooting %: 66.7

10) Tyler Harvey (Eastern Washington)
45.5, 45.3, 88.3 = 179.1
Shot %: 28.0
eFG %: 57.2
True shooting %: 62.7

Inside the Arc (zero three-point attempts)

1) C Kevin Ferguson (Army)
64.2% FG, 1.53 points/shot

2) C Sim Bhullar (New Mexico State)
64.1% FG, 1.62 points/shot

3) F Marshall Bjorklund (North Dakota State)
63.9% FG, 1.55 points/shot

4) F Steve Forbes (IPFW)
63.8% FG, 1.70 points/shot

5) F Jarvis Williams (Murray State)
63.3% FG, 1.77 points/shot

Previous Installments
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December 4
December 11
December 18
January 8
January 15
January 22
January 29
February 5
February 12
February 19
February 26

Stanford adds to its resume with win over No. 23 UCLA (VIDEO)

Dwight Powell, Johnny Dawkins
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In the first meeting between Stanford and No. 23 UCLA on January 23 the Cardinal struggled mightily in the paint. While scoring just 12 points themselves Stanford watched UCLA score 46 points in the paint on their way to a comfortable 91-74 victory. While the Wear twins were quiet, combining to score six points, Tony Parker was not as he accounted for 22 points and seven rebounds in 28 minutes of action.

The Cardinal performed far better in the rematch at Maples Pavilion, and as a result they knocked off the Bruins by the final score of 83-74. UCLA held a six-point edge in points in the paint (32-26) but Stanford managed to shoot 62% from the field and 11-for-20 from beyond the arc. And this occurred with senior forward Dwight Powell being quiet for much of the afternoon, scoring just nine points to go along with five assists and three rebounds.

With Powell limited by UCLA others needed to step up, and the triumvirate of Anthony Brown, Josh Huestis and Chasson Randle did just that. Brown, Huestis and Randle combined to score 66 points with Randle tallying 26, with 20 of those points coming in the first half. Stanford did have issues with the UCLA pressure, especially in the second half, with the Bruins converting 15 Stanford turnovers into 24 points but the gap in that stat (minus-12) wasn’t as large as it was in the first meeting (22-1 UCLA).

UCLA was limited to 44% shooting on the afternoon, and the struggles endured by Jordan Adams played a role in the outcome. After racking up 28 points (12-for-19 FG), six rebounds and five assists in UCLA’s blowout win at Cal the sophomore was limited to just eight points on 2-for-7 shooting. UCLA may have multiple scoring options on the perimeter but it’s Adams who is their most important scorer, and when he struggles it becomes tougher for the Bruins to be at their best.

Stanford was able to make things tough on Adams, and even with UCLA having four other players score in double figures this did impact their offensive efficiency. Stanford was able to execute at a higher level on both ends of the floor than they did in the first meeting, and as a result not only do they have another quality win but there’s also the chance of earning a first-round bye in next month’s Pac-12 tournament.

And looking past the Pac-12 tournament, Stanford’s taken another step towards the first NCAA tournament berth of Johnny Dawkins’ tenure.

The Chase for 180: Riley Grabau utilizing increased opportunities

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Who is the best shooter in the country?

It’s a tough question to answer, isn’t it? Does being a “shooter” simply mean merely being a high-level marksman from beyond the arc? Can a player who thrives in the mid-range but rarely ventures out into three-point land be eligible? How heavily should we be valuing stats like efficiency and effective field goal percentage when taking all of this into account?

One number that we like to use is “180″. How do you become a 180 shooter? By shooting 50% or better from the field overall, 40% or better from three and at least 90% from the charity stripe. From this point forward we’ll track this until the end of the regular season, providing weekly updates as well as a look into how some of the nation’s best find (and connect on) their quality looks.

As a sophomore, Wyoming guard Riley Grabau started 30 of the 32 games in which he played but averaged just 6.0 points per game while shooting 35.2% from the field and 32.3% from beyond the arc. With seniors Derrious Gilmore and Leonard Washington leading the team in scoring and both boasting shot percentages around 26%, Grabau was in the position of being a supplementary piece for the Cowboys.

With those two out of eligibility it was clear that there would be more opportunities for players such as Grabau, and to this point in the season he’s taken advantage. Averaging 11.5 points per game, Grabau’s raised his shooting percentages to 45.4% from the field, 46.7% from three and 90.8% from the foul line. According to nearly 74% of Grabau’s shots have been three-pointers, and he’s avoided taking many of the two-point jumpers (14.3% of his shots) that he hasn’t converted at a particularly high rate thus far (26.9% FG on those shots).

The key for Grabau down the stretch is whether or not he can build on the two games he put together last week, averaging 17.5 points per game in wins over then-No. 5 San Diego State and San Jose State. Against the Aztecs Grabau connected on five of his nine shot attempts from the field, shooting 3-for-6 from beyond the arc. Grabau followed that game up with a 5-for-11 afternoon against San Jose State, performing well offensively in a game that was anything but an offensive masterpiece (Wyoming won, 46-38).

So why would those games be so important moving forward? Wyoming’s lost leading scorer Larry Nance Jr. for the remainder of the season with a torn ACL, which he suffered in their win over Fresno State on Tuesday night. Nance leads Wyoming in shot percentage (27.0%), and the Cowboys will need to find a way to account for the 15.4 points per game (and 8.6 rebounds/game) that he provided if they’re to build on their current three-game win streak.

Among the players who will be asked to do more is Grabau, who scored just six points on Tuesday night (1-for-6 FG). But even with that effort, overall the junior guard has made strides within Larry Shyatt’s system. Can he take another step forward? The Cowboys certainly hope that will be the case.

THE TOP TEN (Note: Players much be eligible to be ranked in FG%, 3PT% and FT%. And here’s a glossary that includes the stats you’ll see used in these posts. Tempo neutral numbers per

1) Matt Kennedy (Charleston Southern)
51.0% FG, 51.9% 3PT, 90.8% 3PT = 193.7
Shot %: 19.2
eFG %: 59.0
True shooting %: 63.8

2) Jason Calliste (Oregon)
52.9, 51.2, 84.8 = 188.9
Shot %: 17.0
eFG %: 66.3
True shooting %: 71.9

3) Doug McDermott (Creighton)
51.3, 44.4, 90.1 = 185.8
Shot %: 38.0
eFG %: 58.5
True shooting %: 63.6

4) Brett Olson (Denver)
48.0, 42.5, 93.4 = 183.9
Shot %: 22.6
eFG %: 57.7
True shooting %: 64.0

5) Riley Grabau (Wyoming)
45.4, 46.7, 90.8 = 182.9
Shot %: 18.0
eFG %: 63.2
True shooting %: 68.9

6) Austin Tillotson (Colgate)
59.3, 50.0, 72.7 = 182.0
Shot %: 18.7
eFG %: 67.4
True shooting %: 69.0

7) Johnny Dee (San Diego)
43.9, 43.9, 93.3 = 181.1
Shot %: 30.4
eFG %: 54.6
True shooting %: 60.3

8) Trevor Releford (Alabama)
50.5, 40.1, 90.5 = 181.1
Shot %: 27.5
eFG %: 60.0
True shooting %: 65.5

9) Anthony Brown (Stanford)
49.1, 49.4, 81.8 = 180.3
Shot %: 18.9
eFG %: 58.3
True shooting %: 62.8

10) Tyler Haws (BYU)
47.8, 44.2, 87.2 = 179.2
Shot %: 31.2
eFG %: 51.8
True shooting %: 59.4

Inside the Arc (zero three-point attempts)

1) F Curtis Washington (Georgia State)
66.9% FG, 1.59 points/shot

2) C Sim Bhullar (New Mexico State)
66.1% FG, 1.71 points/shot

3) F Marquise Simmons (St. Bonaventure)
64.1% FG, 1.56 points/shot

4) F Jameel Warney (Stony Brook)
63.9% FG, 1.54 points/shot

5) F Marshall Bjorklund (North Dakota State)
63.6% FG, 1.54 points/shot

Previous Installments
November 11
December 4
December 11
December 18
January 8
January 15
January 22
January 29
February 5
February 12