Tag: All-Americans

Jerian Grant (AP Photo)

NBCSports.com’s College Basketball All-Americans

Frank Kaminsky (left, AP Photo), Jahlil Okafor (center, AP Photo) and Willie Cauley-Stein (right, UK Athletics)


Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin (18.4 ppg, 8.1 rpg, 2.6 apg, 41.0% 3PT)

Kaminsky has greatly outperformed expectations he had entering the season, even though he was a preseason all-american pick. He’s been sensational, leading the Badgers in scoring, rebounding, assists, blocks and steals. Not bad for a guy that averaged 10 minutes as a sophomore.

Jahlil Okafor, Duke (17.6 ppg, 9.2 rpg)

Okafor is an easy pick as well, as he was the most dominating offensive force in the country this season. To get an idea of just how good he can be, think about this: He’s not just a poor defender, he can be downright awful at times, and yet he’s going to finish the season as a consensus first team all-american and the runner-up to Kaminsky in the Player of the Year voting. Not bad.

D’Angelo Russell, Ohio State (19.2 ppg, 5.6 rpg, 5.2 apg)

If Kaminsky has been the nation’s best player and Okafor has been the most dominating offensive force, than Russell has to be the nation’s most entertaining player. He can take over a game with his ability to score, and he throws some absurd passes in transition. Can he be this year’s Shabazz Napier in the NCAA tournament?

Jerian Grant, Notre Dame (16.8 ppg, 6.7 apg)

The Irish have no business being a top ten team this season, but they are because Grant has been incredible. Notre Dame has one of the most potent offensive attacks in the country, and it all centers around Grant’s ability to make plays off the dribble and in ball-screen actions. He’s better than anyone else in the country at making his teammate’s better.

Willie Cauley-Stein, Kentucky (8.9 ppg, 6.4 rpg, 1.6 bpg)

Cauley-Stein’s numbers don’t measure up to anyone else on the first team, but what he does best doesn’t necessarily show up in the scorebook. The Wildcats are downright dominant on the defensive end of the floor, and Cauley-Stein is the engine that drives them. He’s the best perimeter and the best interior defender in the country all at the same time.


  • Delon Wright, Utah (14.3 ppg, 4.7 rpg, 5.3 apg, 2.1 spg): Wright did so much for Utah this season, and while his numbers were impressive, it was his defense and ability to understand his strengths offensively that were most important to the Utes.
  • Kris Dunn, Providence (15.5 ppg, 5.6 rpg, 7.4 apg): The only reason Dunn isn’t in the conversation for National Player of the Year is that he turns the ball over too much. He was completely dominant at times this season.
  • Buddy Hield, Oklahoma (17.4 ppg, 5.5 rpg): Hield has a rep for being one of the nation’s best defenders, dating back to his freshman season. Now he’s also one of the best wing scorers.
  • Rico Gathers, Baylor (11.6 ppg, 11.7 rpg): Gathers is the nation’s best rebounder, an improving scorer on the block and a critical component for arguably the nation’s most surprising team.
  • Rakeem Christmas, Syracuse (17.5 ppg, 9.1 rpg, 2.5 bpg): He won’t get to showcase his ability this March, but there was not a more improved player in the country than Christmas this season.


  • T.J. McConnell, Arizona (9.6 ppg, 6.3 apg, 2.1 spg): McConnell’s numbers are nowhere near as impressive as the other lead guards here, but if you watched Arizona play over the last two months, you understand just how important he was to that team’s success.
  • Melo Trimble, Maryland (16.1 ppg, 3.1 apg): Maryland is ranked 31st in KenPom. Yet, they’re a top ten team that’s going to be a top four seed because they’re 11-0 in games decided by six points or less. Trimble is their ‘closer’. He earned this spot.
  • Justin Anderson, Virginia (13.4 ppg, 4.3 rpg, 48.5% 3PT): Anderson was in the mix for first team all-american when he broke his finger. He deserves recognition despite missing time.
  • Bobby Portis, Arkansas (17.8 ppg, 8.7 rpg, 1.5 bpg): I was called out by an Arkansas assistant coach for having Bobby Portis ranked 62nd in our top 100 players list in the preseason. That coach was right.
  • Seth Tuttle, Northern Iowa (15.3 ppg, 6.8 rpg, 3.3 apg): I’m fully on the Tuttle bandwagon. He’s a low-post scorer with three point range, the ability to put the ball on the floor and terrific vision. He’s Frank Kaminsky 2.0.

NBCSports.com’s 2014 College Basketball All-Americans

AP Photo


Doug McDermott, Creighton (26.5 ppg, 7.2 rpg, 44.7% 3PT): Dougie McBuckets was considered by most to be the consensus National Player of the Year entering the final weekend of the regular season. Then he went out on his Senior Night and scored a career-high 45 points, giving him 3,000 for his career while passing Oscar Robertson and Hersey Hawkins on college basketball’s career scoring list. If it wasn’t a consensus then, it should be now.

Sean Kilpatrick, Cincinnati (20.9 ppg, 4.3 rpg): The Bearcats are a Final Four contender because they are an elite team on the defensive end of the floor. Offensively, however, they aren’t all that good, and that’s after you factor in that Sean Kilpatrick is having a terrific season. His efficiency numbers aren’t terribly different from McDermott’s, but instead of playing in the nation’s most efficient offense, he’s playing in the nation’s 101st most efficient offense.

Russ Smith, Louisville (17.5 ppg, 4.8 apg, 3.5 rpg, 2.0 spg, 39.4% 3PT): The key to Louisville’s season has been Smith’s ability to embrace being a point guard isn’t of simply being Russdiculous. It should tell you something that, on his Senior Night and just three days after exploding for 22 second half points and six threes in eight minutes in a come-from-behind win at SMU, Smith finished with 13 assists and just two shots from the floor.

RELATED: Player of the Year | Coach of the Year | Freshman of the Year

Jabari Parker, Duke (19.2 ppg, 9.0 rpg): Parker’s midseason slump is a distant memory at this point, as he’s figured out how to play as Duke’s best defensive rebounder and most important weapon offensively. Being the cornerstone offensively for one of the nation’s top two offenses is impressive.

Getty Images

Shabazz Napier, UConn (17.8 ppg, 6.0 rpg, 5.2 apg, 1.8 spg, 40.7% 3PT): Where would UConn be without Shabazz Napier? And I’m not just talking about the fact that he’s their go-to guy offensively, their best on-ball defender and their leading rebounder despite standing all of 6-foot-1. What about all the game-winning, clutch baskets that he’s scored this season? Would UConn still be a tournament team without win over Florida, Indiana, Memphis and Boston College?


  • Kyle Anderson, UCLA (14.9 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 6.7 apg, 48.0% 3PT): Slo-mo just flat-out produces. He’s the engine that’s carried UCLA’s high-powered offense this season.
  • Nick Johnson, Arizona (16.1 ppg, 4.0 rpg): Johnson has slumped a bit down the stretch of the season, but he’s the best perimeter defender and the most dangerous scorer in the half court for a top five team.
  • Bryce Cotton, Providence (21.7 ppg, 5.9 apg): Cotton’s had a truly unbelievable season, carrying an injury-riddled Providence team to within a strong Big East tournament of an at-large bid. He’s averaging 40.1 minutes this season.
  • Cleanthony Early, Wichita State (16.0 ppg, 5.9 rpg): The leading scorer for the undefeated Shockers, Early is WSU’s best athlete and their toughest matchup: an athletic, 6-foot-8 four-man with three-point range.
  • Andrew Wiggins, Kansas (16.8 ppg, 5.9 rpg, 1.2 spg): For all the criticism that Wiggins has gotten this season, he finished the year as the leading scorer, third-leading rebounder and best defender on a top five team and national title that won the nation’s toughest conference outright. Not bad.

MORE: Florida, Wichita State are still sitting atop NBCSports.com’s Top 25


  • T.J. Warren, N.C. State (24.2 ppg, 6.9 rpg): With all due respect to Doug McDermott, I’m not sure there is a better pure scorer in the country than Warren.
  • DeAndre Kane, Iowa State (17.1 ppg, 6.7 rpg, 5.9 apg): As impressive as Kane’s numbers are, imagine if he didn’t have to deal with a sprained ankle at the start of league play.
  • Nik Stauskas, Michigan (17.4 ppg, 3.4 apg, 3.3 rpg, 45.8% 3PT): The development of Stauskas into a playmaker that John Beilein can run his offense through is the reason the Wolverines are Big Ten champs.
  • Cameron Bairstow, New Mexico (20.3 ppg, 7.2 rpg): Bairstow is the most improved player in the country are arguably the nation’s best low-post scorer.
  • Melvin Ejim, Iowa State (18.2 ppg, 8.6 rpg): Ejim was voted by the coaches as the Big 12’s player of the year, over two other all-americans, Joel Embiid, Juwan State, Marcus Smart and a handful of other stars.

NBCSports.com 2013-2014 College Basketball Preseason All-American Team

Marcus Smart
AP Photo

All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of our preview lists, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.


Smart shocked the college hoops world when he announced back in the spring that he would be returning to school for his sophomore season. It was great news for the Pokes, however, as they now have a chance to win the Big 12. Hopefully, Smart spent the offseason making his jumpshot more consistent, because that’s the only thing that he does not excel at on a basketball court. He’s tied with Aaron Craft atop the intangibles leaderboard.


Andrew Wiggins, Kansas, Fr.: There’s an argument to be made that Wiggins will enter the season with more hype surrounding him than any freshman in the history of college basketball. How about this for expectations: if he averages 18 points and 8 boards, it will be seen as a disappointing season. Yeesh. Wiggins is an absurdly athletic, 6-foot-8 wing with the physical tools to one day be some combination of Scottie Pippen and Tracy McGrady. But is he ready to reach that level right now?

source: Getty Images
Getty Images

Russ Smith, Louisville, Sr.: Smith may not be much of an NBA prospect, but he’s the perfect player for Rick Pitino. A ballhawk defensively, Smith proved himself capable of being an efficient scorer last season, even winning KenPom.com’s Efficiency Player of the Year award a season ago. It will be interesting to see if the 5-foot-11 Smith plays more point this season in an effort to audition to NBA teams.

Julius Randle, Kentucky, Fr.: Randle is a beast. Plain and simple. The 6-foot-9 lefty is going to score a lot of points and grab a lot of rebounds simply because he’s bigger, stronger, more athletic and more aggressive than so many of his collegiate counterparts. It doesn’t matter that he’s only a freshman. Ironically enough, the only thing that could really end up holding Randle back is the fact that John Calipari is going to experiment with playing him on the perimeter.

Doug McDermott, Creighton, Sr.: Ho-hum, just a third straight season where Doug McDermott will end up being an All-American, which is incredible considering the kid went to Creighton over Northern Iowa and even his own father didn’t think he was good enough to get a scholarship when he was at Iowa State. McDermott is the best scorer in the country, and he’ll have a chance to prove it as the Bluejays make their way into the Big East this season.


Jahii Carson, Arizona State, So.: The most electric talent this side of Andre Wiggins is must-see TV whenever he steps onto the court.

Gary Harris, Michigan State, So.: We’re going to get a chance to see just how good Harris can be now that his shoulder is healthy.

Jabari Parker, Duke, Fr.: Parker is arguably the most skilled player in the country and will be the star of the ACC favorite Blue Devils.

C.J. Fair, Syracuse, Sr.: Fair has spent three years as one of the most underrated and consistent players in the Big East. Let’s see if that translates to the ACC.

Mitch McGary, Michigan, So.: He’s massive, he plays hard, he attacks the glass and he’s got a lot more skill to his game than he’s had a chance to show thus far.


source: Getty Images
Getty Images

Aaron Craft, Ohio State, Sr.: Craft is the best on-ball defender in the country. He’s also a leader and a winner, two skills you cannot teach. Can he score more this season?

Shabazz Napier, UConn, Sr.: Like Fair, Napier has had a terrific career at UConn that’s been somewhat overshadowed thanks to Kemba Walker and UConn’s APR.

Spencer Dinwiddie, Colorado, Jr.: The 6-foot-6 point guard is going to have a chance to show what he can do to a national audience in the resurgent Pac-12.

Adreian Payne, Michigan State, Sr.: Consistency is the key for Payne, who is a lottery pick if he can ever figure out how to bring it on a nightly basis.

Aaron Gordon, Arizona, Fr.: The nation’s best dunker will be a star if he accepts that he’s a prototype stretch four at the college level.


  • Isaiah Austin, Baylor, So.
  • Markel Brown, Oklahoma State, Sr.
  • Semaj Christon, Xavier, So.
  • Cleanthony Early, Wichita State, Sr.
  • Montrezl Harrell, Louisville, So.
  • Tyler Haws, BYU, Jr.
  • Rodney Hood, Duke, So.
  • Kevin Pangos, Gonzaga, Jr.
  • Glenn Robinson III, Michigan, So.
  • James Young, Kentucky, Fr.