Tag: Alabama Crimson Tide

Avery Johnson
Associated Press

Avery Johnson stirring up excitement before Alabama debut


TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) Avery Johnson has created some excitement around Alabama’s program, making inroads on the recruiting trail and drawing a big crowd to a preseason event.

The first-year Crimson Tide coach might take longer to turn that buzz into wins but guard Retin Obasohan is enjoying the change.

“Gosh, it’s electrifying,” Obasohan said. “You can feel it. You can sense it. It’s like an aura that’s in the air. Everywhere you go, you’ve got people whispering. They think you can’t hear it, but we can hear everything they’re saying.”

Much of that attention is because of the splashy hiring of Johnson, a former NBA coach of the year and longtime San Antonio Spurs point guard who replaced the fired Anthony Grant.

His catch phrase has been “buckle up.” But the ride could be bumpy at times during his first season.

As Johnson said: “It’s not going to happen overnight.”

The Tide has been picked to finish 13th in the 14-team league.

Johnson must replace the top three scorers from last year’s team that advanced to the second round of the NIT, including team captain Levi Randolph.

That means big roles for some of the five newcomers – not counting two transfers who have to sit out the season – and increased expectations for returnees like forwards Shannon Hale and Jimmie Taylor and point guard Justin Coleman.

The athletic but inconsistent Hale is the top returning scorer after averaging 8.2 points a game before missing the final six games with a broken foot.

“I think this is the best I’ve felt in two years,” Hale said. “I’ve been rehabbing all summer. I’m just getting back to myself. It’s been going great.”

Johnson did wrap up a solid recruiting class after his hiring, especially within Alabama. He brought in Mr. Basketball guard Dazon Ingram, along with forward Donta Hall and guard Brandon Austin, and has begun the makings of another strong class.

Graduate transfer Arthur Edwards, a reserve with New Mexico, also joins the team.

Here are some things to know about Alabama’s team in 2015-16.

FAN SUPPORT: Nearly 7,500 fans showed up for Tide Tipoff, an event promoting the men’s and women’s teams Tuesday night that featured 3-point shooting and dunk contests and a performance by hip hop artist Rae Sremmurd. By comparison, fewer than 2,500 fans showed up for Alabama’s opening round NIT game against Illinois.

TEMPO: Johnson has geared practices toward speeding up the playing tempo for a team that averaged just 63.2 points per game in SEC play. “That transformation has been tough in a lot of ways because they’re playing faster more consistently than they ever have,” he said.

TAYLOR’S ROLE: Johnson had high praise for the 6-foot-10 Taylor, whose 59 blocked shots were the most by an Alabama player since Jamychal Green in 2010-11. He’s the only returning player who started all 34 games last season, averaging 5.5 points and 4.9 rebounds. “Jimmie’s gotten better at all facets of the game,” Johnson said. “We’re looking for him to have a much better year than averaging five points a game. We’re going to lean on him a lot this year.”

MISSING SCORING: Replacing the versatile Randolph won’t be easy. He led the team in scoring and assists and was second in rebounding. But he, Ricky Tarrant and Rodney Cooper combined to average nearly 40 points a game for a team that struggled offensively.

RETIN’S RETURN: Obasohan finished last season as one of Alabama’s hottest players after replacing an injured Tarrant. He scored in double figures only once in his first 20 games then averaged 12.2 points per game over the final 14.

Alabama forward Hale still recovering from foot injury

Justin Coleman, Shannon Hale
Associated Press
Leave a comment

With the team’s top three scorers from last season having moved on, Alabama will need increased production from junior forward Shannon Hale in head coach Avery Johnson’s debut season. Hale averaged 8.2 points and 3.2 rebounds in 28 games last season, of which he started 15. Unfortunately for Hale his season was cut short by six games due to a broken foot suffered in the first half of a win over South Carolina February 24.

Hale’s been working hard to return to full strength, but the process will take some time. According to Michael Casagrande of AL.com, Hale’s just begun to go through some half-court drills. It remains to be seen when the 6-foot-8 Hale will be able to return to full activity for the Crimson Tide, who are also working to get Michael Kessens back into game shape.

Forward Michael Kessens should be ready to play by the season begins, but he’s been out for a while. Johnson said he’s “slowly rounding into shape” and they need him to play a big role this year. “We’ve broken his body down physically and now we’re putting it back together,” Johnson said. “So he’s come a long way since I first took the job.”

Guard Retin Obasohan, who averaged more than 12 points per game over Alabama’s final 13 games of the season, is back and will give this young group some needed experience on the perimeter. But, if Alabama’s to hold its own in an SEC that’s gotten stronger they’ll need a full rotation in the front court as well.

And with Kessens and Hale still working towards getting back into a position where they can contribute in games, Alabama could be shorthanded when their season begins November 13 against Kennesaw State with a game at expected Atlantic 10 contender Dayton scheduled for November 17.

Coaching Changes: Who’s set for success, failure

Screen Shot 2015-09-27 at 6.53.53 PM
Associated Press
Leave a comment

The college basketball coaching carousel was in full effect last spring, as 40 head coaching positions changed hands. Of those 40 jobs, 12 major high major programs will enter this season with a new man in charge while six more teams that would be classified as mid-major plus had turnover in leadership.

Here are the coaches in the best position to succeed immediately, and those that will likely need some time before they see the kind of success they’re used to:


  1. Steve Prohm, Iowa State: With Fred Hoiberg making the move to the NBA, someone was bound to land a job coaching a team with the talent needed to play deep into the NCAA tournament. Prohm was the pick for Iowa State after a successful run at Murray State, and with players such as Monte Morris, Georges Niang and Jameel McKay, his first season in Ames can be a special one.
  2. Will Wade, VCU: Yes, Wade has some personnel losses to account as the former Shaka Smart assistant returns to VCU; most notably, Briante Weber and Treveon Graham have graduated. The cupboard isn’t bare either, however, as Melvin Johnson is back for his senior year, as are JeQuan Lewis and Mo-Alie Cox. Look for the Rams to once again be a factor in the Atlantic 10 race. (And yes, I know my opinion differs from some of my colleagues.)
  3. Tim Duryea, Utah State: Duryea’s definitely familiar with the USU roster, as he served as the now-retired Stew Morrill’s assistant for 14 seasons. And he’s got a good roster to work with, with all five starters returning led by forwards Jalen Moore and David Collette. Utah State exceeded expectations by finishing fourth in the Mountain West a season ago; they’ll be expected to contend this time around and have the pieces to do just that.
  4. Mike White, Florida: Like Prohm, White arrives at his new gig after experiencing a lot of success at his last stop. But unlike Prohm he’s taking over for a coach in Billy Donovan took Florida’s program to heights never before reached in the history of the program. There’s some talent to work with, especially if he can get Kasey Hill going, and White also managed to hold onto most of Florida’s 2015 recruiting class.
  5. Ben Howland, Mississippi State: While Howland’s resume surpasses that of any other coach on this list, and he’ll have Malik Newman at his disposal, that doesn’t overtake the fact that there’s a lot to be done with a program that struggled mightily in the three seasons prior. Howland put together a good recruiting class led by Newman, but if there’s a concern it’s the health of his front court (that wasn’t all too deep to begin with).
  6. Matt McCall, Chattanooga: McCall’s first head coaching gig at the Division I level has the potential to be a very successful one, thanks to the talent due back on campus. Four starters, including guard Casey Jones and forward Justin Tuoyo, return from a team that won 22 games and finished 15-3 in SoCon play.
  7. Eran Ganot, Hawai’i: Last season began with tumult for Hawai’i, but interim head coach Benjy Taylor was able to lead the Rainbow Warriors to 22 wins and a run to the Big West tournament final. Now former Saint Mary’s assistant Eran Ganot takes over an experienced group that returns three starters (seven who started at least two games) led by Big West Defensive Player of the Year Roderick Bobbitt.

MORE: 2015-16 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule

AP Photo
AP Photo


  1. Shaka Smart, Texas: A key question for some is how Smart’s pressure system will mesh with bigs who are best equipped to play in the half court. However the biggest issue in Smart’s first season at the helm in Austin is the strength of the Big 12, with perennial favorite Kansas leading what should be a deep race. There’s still talent, enough to make the tournament, but contending in the Big 12 may take a little time.
  2. Rick Barnes, Tennessee: Barnes has relocated to Knoxville, where he’ll aim to rejuvenate a program that dealt with the Donnie Tyndall investigation (and ultimately, firing) for much of last season. Three starters return but the one true difference-maker, Josh Richardson, isn’t among those players. Add in a lack of size in the post, and this could be a difficult season for Barnes in an SEC that will be improved.
  3. Avery Johnson, Alabama: Johnson and his staff have made some waves recruiting-wise, most notably reeling in Terrance Ferguson, and that certainly bodes well for the future. However, when it comes to this season he inherits a roster that lost its top three scorers from a season ago. That could prove difficult to overcome in a league that’s improved from last season.
  4. Chris Mullin, St. John’s: To say that Mullin and his staff were left with a bare cupboard would be an understatement. Two of the remaining players (Chris Obekpa and Rysheed Jordan) didn’t exactly mesh with the new staff’s plans, so they moved on. The work done by Mullin and assistants Barry Rohrssen and Matt Abdelmassih to fill out the roster will help St. John’s in the long run, but this season could be a difficult one.
  5. Brian Wardle, Bradley: Wardle’s move from Green Bay to Peoria, Illinois is a big one for a Bradley program that struggled in a big way under Geno Ford. Given Wardle’s accomplishments he’s got a good chance of turning things around. But it’s going to take some time to do so, especially with just one starter from last season’s nin win team back on campus. There was a lot of turnover on the roster, so the Braves will take their lumps as a result.
  6. Bobby Hurley, Arizona State: Hurley put together two successful seasons at Buffalo before making the move west, and he inherits a roster doesn’t lack for experience. In a similar situation at Buffalo in 2013-14, he led the Bulls to 19 wins and had the MAC Player of the Year in Javon McCrea. The two issues this time around: while the Pac-12 may not have a dominant team as it did a season ago (Arizona) it is deeper, and the Sun Devils will have to navigate a tough non-conference slate as well.
  7. Dave Leitao, DePaul: Since Leitao’s first run at DePaul came to an end in 2005, the Blue Demons have struggled mightily. Now he returns to the Windy City, and while there is some talent (Billy Garrett Jr. being one option) there’s a long way to go when it comes to making a move up the Big East standings and being a true factor in the conference.