July Live Period


Highlights from the 2014 Nike EYBL Peach Jam (VIDEO)

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The Nike EYBL Peach Jam wrapped up on Sunday evening with the New Jersey Playaz, led by 20 points, 12 rebounds and seven assists from Isaiah Briscoe defeating Team Penny, 85-83, in the championship game.

Courtside Films was there to capture highlights throughout the week, compiling the best plays into a seven-minute video. The mixtape features the top recruits in the Peach Jam field, such as Briscoe, Ben Simmons, Malik Monk, Allonzo Trier, Cheick Diallo, and Stephen Zimmerman.

College Basketball Talk‘s own Rob Dauster and Scott Phillips were in attendance at the prestigious grassroots event with all full coverage from the five-day championship tournament:

For full July live period coverage CLICK HERE

July live period: a time when the finishing touches are done for the upcoming season

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Tyus Jones and the Howard Pulley Panthers (Minn.) played BABC (Mass.) in front a nationally-televised game Wednesday night. Jones, the five-star point guard, helped Howard Pulley earn a hard-fought win over the Boston-based AAU club. Throughout the night, ESPNU cameras scanned the crowd, landing on several Division I coaches in attendance. One of the coaches the cameras focused in on was Michigan State’s Tom Izzo. With the July live period coming to a close, this will be one of the last opportunities Izzo has to be present for one of Jones’ games.

Izzo is in a recruiting battle for Jones with six other schools, and while he is hoping to get a commitment from the Minnesota native for 2014, Kevin Pauga is back in the East Lansing offices, preparing for the season ahead. The non-conference schedule, hotels, transportation, even basketball camps … all part of the summer duties of the Michigan State Director of Basketball Operations.

“All the nitty-gritty things we need to do to get a head of the game come fall is how I spend my July,” Pauga told NBC Sports in a phone interview earlier this week. “It’s a never-ending process.”

To read through NBCSports.com’s series on July’s live recruiting period, click here.

While coaches are on the road, Pauga is getting a lot of the administrative work done as the basketball camps have been completed for the summer.

“July is a time when I hit the reset button,” Pauga added. “Camps closed last week. I’m in full 2013-2014 mode.”

For four years now, Pauga has served as the director of ops for Sparty. Before returning to his alma mater, Pauga has worked in the program in other capacities, starting as a student manager in 2000 and working as a video coordinator from 2004-2008. From his experiences, director of basketball operations is about being prepared months in advance to make sure the season runs smoothly.

“Everything related to ops is being a step ahead,” Pauga said. “You can say that about many different things, but you can’t be planning a schedule as you go through a season. You can’t be calling for a bus company three days before, whereas when you’re scouting you are one or two opponents ahead. Here, I’m already dealing with stuff for the Big Ten tournament next year.”

It’s not only travel and practice schedules, Pauga also has to work within his own athletic department. Pauga refers to himself as a liaison, working with the other teams that use the Breslin Center, which also hosts a number of other events.

Pauga is a veteran of basketball operations, but for Jesse Bopp, it’s an adjustment now two months on the job. He’s getting used to his new role at VCU, re-joining Shaka Smart’s staff after a three-year stint as the head coach of Vermont Academy. Last week he was in charge of the nearly 400 campers at the Shaka Smart Basketball Camp, while also conducting his usual basketball ops duties.

“That’s the nature of the beast,” Bopp told NBC Sports last Thursday. “This is what it’s all about, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

Communication has been the biggest tool for the first-year director of operations with the VCU coaches on the road. Before the live period began, Smart spent much of late June and early July with USA Basketball’s Under-19 team as an assistant coach to Billy Donovan.

“I don’t think it’s different (in the office), besides the fact that you’re not seeing those guys face-to-face,” Bopp said. “One of the greatest things of our program is our communication level. Our communication with each other is extremely high.”

When the summer comes to an end, the focus will shift to the players on the roster, and getting back on the floor as a team. But before practice officially tips, Pauga and Bopp are still finalizing their respective practice schedules, along with the rest of traveling arrangements. Coaches are on the road for the next few days, attempting to fill out rosters for upcoming seasons. While coaches are wrapping up on the recruiting trail, directors of basketball operations are organizing all the behind-the-scene aspects.

Recruiting is clearly vital to a team’s success, but all the preparation put forth by each director of basketball operations make that six-month grind a bit easier.

“In my world, that’s a priority, making sure we are ahead of the game,” Pauga. “Fall is gonna come here real quick.”

Terrence is also the lead writer at NEHoopNews.com and can be followed on Twitter: @terrence_payne

No rest, only growth for graduate assistants in July

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Bryan Sherrer is staying busy this July.

Not only is the Murray State graduate assistant keeping tabs on the players currently on campus, but he’s also wrapping up his time with the program.

After two years on staff in Murray, Sherrer, a former Murray State player himself, is interviewing for assistant coaching positions, getting looks from High Point and Wallace State (Ala.) Community College-Selma.

But for now, he’s carrying the graduate assistant tag and everything that comes with it.

“You have to look at it like, everyone that started as a GA [graduate assistant],” Sherrer said by phone last week.”You have to look at the future and think ‘this is where I’m going to get,’ it motivates you to try to get where I want to be [as a coach].”

Sherrer (pictured above) said he hopes to hear something about a coaching position in the next few weeks.

              To read through NBCSports.com’s series on July’s live recruiting period, click here.

Until then, Sherrer has done what most GAs do during the July live recruiting period, maintain and organize. He makes sure the players are attending their summer classes and weight room sessions, while also getting shots up and working on their respective games in the CFSB Center.

This is the picture that’s painted across most college basketball programs at this time. Along with the on-campus responsibilities, GAs like Western Kentucky’s Michael Pollio also keep in constant contact with the head and assistant coaches on the road to help them keep a handle on the recruiting scene.

That’s one wrinkle that most graduate assistants also carry with them in July.

Most of that has to do with keeping track of the schedules that the coaches must keep while on the road. Including keeping up with information on where certain targets are playing, whether their respective teams have changed schedules or whether the player coaches want to evaluate will be playing in the game.

“It’s different with all the coaches,” Pollio said. “Some of the coaches, some days I’ll talk to them to see how their trip went, see if they need anything, directions to gym, anything like that. [Others] I’ll talk to them at night when they’ve finished their recruiting days.”

The Little Things

The basis of the summer period remains the same for most GAs. It’s the smaller nuances that both make their time with their respective teams different and also attempt to give them an edge toward becoming a coach, something all three graduate assistants interviewed for this story want to be.

In the case of SMU intern Sean Stout – different programs have different titles for their graduate helpers, such as assistants/managers/interns/etc. – he is in his second summer working with Larry Brown, from whom he’s already learned a vast amount, on and off the court.

“It’s been great,” he said. “I didn’t know a lot before I took the job. It’s been better than I ever could’ve ever imagined. Coach Brown is concerned with what’s going on with you and what’s going on with your family…The biggest thing is, he wants everyone to be a head coach. So he’s helping me or any of the assistants get to that point.”

Stout added that Brown’s presence in recruiting has helped the Mustangs get in the race for recruits that they otherwise wouldn’t have had a chance with — SMU brings in two four star recruits in Keith Frazier and Sterling Brown and a three star recruit in Ben Moore in their 2013 haul. Also, despite heading into the newly-minted American Athletic Conference, the staff hasn’t altered its recruiting pitch or preparation.

“I don’t think the conference is as important to the kids as it was 5-10 years ago,” he said.

Jack Of All Trades

When the coaches come in from the road, Pollio says the team takes on a schedule that includes meetings to go over the details of the next recruiting live period, discussing summer practice routines and getting a progress reports on current players.

“When the coaches are in town, we have two hour practices,” Pollio said. “We work with the guys when the coaches aren’t in town, make sure guys are in their lift sessions. All players are in July classes, so we make sure they’re in their classes….We require a certain amount of study hall hours. A lot of it revolves around the academic side with our players.”

For others, the progression of the players takes an equal amount, if not more time, than keeping up with the coaches while they’re out recruiting.

In his capacity with the team, Stout said he can spend additional time outside of the NCAA-mandated two hours per week with the players. Those two hours are the limit for head and assistant coaches in the summer. In total, players can spend eight hours per week working in the summer periods: two hours on the court and six in the weight room.

Stout said the coaching staff breaks the two on-court hours down to three 40-minute practices per week. And while the summer sounds like a slower time, take Stout’s word for it, it’s no time to get lethargic.

“Not necessarily,” Stout said when asked if he gets a break in the warmer months. “The summer is supposed to be a little slower, but especially during this recruiting period, it doesn’t slow down…..It’s still a lot busier time that people think. It’s not a vacation, that’s for sure.”

Though all of the preparation and planning back on-campus is for one thing: The regular season.

“We are always working towards next year,” Pollio said. “So the motivation comes from [that] we’ve already started working towards next season. So the motivation is pretty easy on that side of things.”

For guys like Sherrer, who know all too well that their job as a GA is temporary, it’s also about getting things ready for the next person that takes their job after they’ve moved on.

“I’m really getting stuff for the next guy that comes in,” Sherrer added. “Make sure they have everything mapped out for when they come in.”

(Photo courtesy of Tab Brockman)

Follow David Harten on Twitter at @David_Harten

How Spike, Josh and Sam spent their summer vacations

Cleanthony Early, Sam Dower
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You’d be hard-pressed to find a college player goofing off or hitting the beach this summer. We checked in with three players with something to prove in the upcoming season, so we could find out how they’re working toward their goals.

No Flash in the Pan

As a freshman, Spike Albrecht was a seldom-used bench player. Suddenly, in the title game, he was not only in the game against Louisville, but he was on fire. Albrecht played 28 minutes – by far his most of the season – and poured in 17 points on 6 of 9 shooting. A lot of guys could live on that for the rest of their lives, but for Albrecht, it’s not nearly enough.

“I was more upset that we lost and that I couldn’t do anything in the second half to help us win,” Albrecht told NBCSports by phone. “I was kind of bummed out.”

It couldn’t have helped that Kate Upton – subject of a legendary post-game tweet from Albrecht – decided Blake Griffin is more her speed.

We know now that Albrecht isn’t content being a bench-warmer on the court, or in life. Now that it seems like everybody knows his name, Albrecht is working to make sure his game is up to par, despite the fact that John Beilein has Derrick Walton coming in to, presumably, play in front of him.

To read through NBCSports.com’s series on July’s live recruiting period, click here.

“There’s a lot of talented guys on this team,” Albrecht acknowledged. “But I don’t think they’re going to take me lightly, you know? The most important thing at my size is to get stronger and more athletic, then do as much on the court as I can. Make sure my handle is as good as it can be and that my shot is right.”

Albrecht is also doubling up on his classwork, taking philosophy and science in the compressed summer session. Which is not to say that he’s having no fun at all. He kept his head right and his game tight even while he was visiting home.

“It’s nice because me, Glenn Robinson and Mitch McGary are all from Indiana, and we all live within about a half hour of each other, so we were getting together every day, working out and playing games and stuff. It’s great playing with other guys who know what they’re doing so you don’t get hurt or anything.”

Albrecht isn’t all business. He enjoys a good game of golf. But he’s the rare college kid who thinks video games are a waste of time. So, maybe he’s mostly business.

Recovering from Injury

Where Albrecht is attempting to deal with the sudden appearance of the spotlight, one of his Big Ten rivals has the opposite problem. Josh Gasser was a major component at Wisconsin from day one, averaging 34 minutes, 7.6 points, and two assists per game as a freshman in the 2011-12 season. The 6’3″, 190-lb point guard was set to expand on those numbers: Bo Ryan had named him the starting point guard right before Gasser blew out his ACL in October, and was forced to miss the entire season.

“It happened so quick,” Gasser said via telephone. “Everything was going so well, then a second changes everything. It was a mixture of feelings, being pissed off or mad or sad, depressed, whatever. It was tough to deal with, but after a couple of weeks it all sunk in and I decided to rise to the challenge.”

Right after surgery to repair the ligaments, Gasser could only wait for the swelling to go down. Then began the torturous process of taking baby steps. “At first, the worst thing is trying to get your flexion back. Your knee is so stiff you can’t bend it at all. Then as it goes on, there are various exercises that you dislike the most. Conditioning, and trying to get your legs under you because it’s been so long since you’ve run and cut.”

Gasser was told by trainers that his injury would take a full twelve months to heal. Nine months in, he’s re-learning how to run, jump and cut, alongside the mental effort of enduring residual pain and trying not to hurry his body toward the upcoming season. He’s under orders to rest and recuperate in between rehab and workouts, so he’s had time to indulge in the sort of TV marathons the rest of us take for granted.

“I’m on the second season of Friday Night Lights,” Gasser said. “I usually don’t get into series; I just like to watch basketball games and football games. But after the NBA Finals were over, I started that series and now I’m hooked on it.”

Gasser is also taking a summer class, and his rigorous workout regimen allows the Wisconsin native to indulge in a statewide rite of summer – plenty of bratwurst.

“I’m from here, so I eat them pretty often,” Gasser said. “I’m trying to gain some weight back, so it’s not really a problem for me. I’m burning a lot of calories, so whatever I put back in me is fine.”

Filling NBA-sized Shoes

Quite often, players will spend part of the summer months helping out at coaching clinics. Gonzaga’s Sam Dower recently taught the youth of Spokane some of the moves he’s been working on through the warm months. “I’m working on my conditioning, also driving to the basket now that Kelly Olynyk is gone,” he said. “Teams also try to take away my left hand a lot, so I’m working on a counter move getting to that right hand off that left shoulder.”

Dower has big shoes to fill. Olynyk had a breakout season for the Zags last year, his stock rising so high he became the thirteenth pick in the NBA draft. The Canadian big man impressed in the summer league as well, giving Dower a high mark to aim at.

An avid outdoorsman, Dower has enjoyed spending time with David Stockton and other teammates at the Stockton family’s lake house when rare weekend free time comes up. He says Olynyk and Stockton have had some epic Call of Duty sessions, but he personally prefers the NBA2K franchise.

Dower also took in a couple of summer flicks, though he may have wished he hadn’t.

“I saw The Conjuring,” he said, laughing. “It was probably the scariest movie I’ve ever seen. I couldn’t even sleep that night. I definitely recommend it if you like scary films.”

So, pretty much your typical summer for these guys. Food, sun, fun and some elite-level basketball workouts. And they, like the rest of us, can hardly wait until the weather turns cooler, and the action on the court starts up again. That’s when all the work really pays off.

Eric Angevine is the editor of Storming the Floor. He tweets @stfhoops.

Rising Coaches Elite provides aspiring coaches valuable networking, learning opportunities

Rising Coaches Elite
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While it doesn’t receive the level of attention that areas such as recruiting and player development do when discussing college basketball during the summer, the art of networking can be vital for those who are looking to improve their professional standing within the game.

That’s a relatively easy process for the coaches, as the three five-day evaluation periods give them a chance to not only observe players but also communicate with each other. While that could be simply a matter of catching up with old acquaintances, there’s also the ability to exchange ideas on a number of topics.

But what about those support staffers, the graduate assistants, directors of basketball operations and video staffers do since they aren’t allowed to hit the road (representing a school) during this period? That’s where Rising Coaches Elite comes into play.

Created by former Clemson basketball staffers Adam Gordon (currently director of operations at Mississippi State), Andy Farrell (assistant at Longwood) and Trey Meyer (assistant at Miami University), Rising Coaches Elite will hold its fourth annual conference in Las Vegas beginning Tuesday.

To read through NBCSports.com’s series on July’s live recruiting period, click here.

And the fourth edition will also include a Rising Athletic Directors Conference, an opportunity that wasn’t available the first three years.

“After all of the Rising Coaches conferences we’d sit down and ask all the attendees during an open panel discussion what they wanted to see and what could be done better,” said Farrell in a phone interview with NBC Sports.

“A lot of people mentioned, ‘what if an athletic director came to speak with us about what they expect from our position?’ So once [the founders] broke it down some more, we thought that since we’re doing this for the young coaches what if we could reach young aspiring athletic directors too?”

Also instrumental in the process of adding a conference for those who aspire to ultimately become athletic directors was Ben Rosenfeld, who is currently the director of sport administration for the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC). This would ultimately lead to the formation of Rising Athletic Directors, and it can only help those involved on both sides of the process.

Aspiring coaches get to learn not only from those are coaching, but they also get to learn from athletic administrators while networking with the people who could very well determine whether or not they’re hired for a job down the line.

This year’s group will get to hear from head coaches such as Andy Enfield (USC), Kerry Keating (Santa Clara) and Pat Skerry (Towson) in addition to multiple assistants and college administrators. There’s also the ability to interact with other success stories, with Farrell being one of the many who have experienced success in their careers since participating in Rising Coaches Elite.

In addition to the current group of staffers throughout the country there are others, whether it’s your team managers or walk-ons who see little playing time, who hope to begin their coaching journey by landing a support staff position in the near future.

According to Farrell, there are a couple things an aspiring coach needs to do in order to successfully make the transition.

“First and foremost they need to let someone, a mentor, know that they’re looking,” said Farrell. “You’ve got to let your mentors know that you’re looking, because once they know then they can start using their experience, knowledge and network.

“The other thing I would suggest for them to do is work camps. Find any and every way to get to know the people you’re working the camps with and the program you’re working the camp for. Because while that may not get you a job right away, those are the connections and networking opportunities that will take you infinitely farther.”

Farrell also noted the need to continue to learn, whether it’s about the Xs and Os of the game or other areas that programs need to take care of in order to be successful. And given the number of participants who have gone on to enjoy success in their careers, it’s become evident that Rising Coaches Elite has been a positive factor in this regard.

Raphielle can be followed on Twitter at @raphiellej.

InRecruit shines a light on the 99 percent

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“You have the top 150 kids every year who are steered one way or another, and it’s always the same schools and kids with the same ability level who have that opportunity. There are a few success stories for kids outside that process every year, but we wanted to change the way this process works.”

That’s how Joseph Rocco describes the recruiting process. In a phone conversation with NBCSports.com, Rocco described how he and former Villanova star Malik Allen set out to change that paradigm, by creating the social media platform inRecruit.

“After Malik retired from the NBA, he was looking for something other than a broadcasting or low-level coaching gig,” Rocco said. The two friends, who graduated from Villanova together in 2010, decided to combine their talents and knowledge. While Allen was forging a ten-year NBA career, Rocco was practicing law. It was a perfect match.

From the beginning, they focused on making productive relationships available, not only to the mega-talented one percent, but also to kids who might not be on anyone’s radar. Their goal: to open up the lines of communication that would not only allow blue-blood programs to keep track of the big name recruits, but also help connect lower-level athletes with the right schools, be they DII, DIII or junior college.

“We have the eye of the top schools and the top recruits, and that’s good for us as a company,” Rocco said. “But at the end of the day, this platform is built for those kids outside the 1 percent. That’s most of us.”

Allen and Rocco made sure to design the platform to appeal to all stakeholders in the recruiting process: fans, athletes, journalists, coaches and even parents. Including parents was important for both men, who serve as godparents to one another’s children.

“There is no platform out there that recognizes parents as an integral part of the process,” Rocco said. “It’s their child’s future. You can’t even join inRecruit if you’re under 14 years of age without a parent’s approval. You have to involve parents or it’s not going to work.”

The beta test of inRecruit just launched in July, but two years of work went into the platform’s look and function. The Allen/Rocco team spent two years meeting with coaches from college (most notably Jay Wright and the Villanova staff), high school and the NBA. In order to make sure nobody runs afoul of the governing body’s rules, inRecruit was designed with direct input from the NCAA as well.

“We wanted to set this platform up for coaches not to be able to fail,” Rocco said. “People come down hard on the NCAA, but it’s a tough job. Social media are difficult to regulate. They write a rule based on what they know at the time, then technology leaps ahead.”

In a way, inRecruit and similar programs may end up shining some light on the often sordid business of recruiting. So much of what people don’t like about recruiting happens in the dark, directed through middlemen. Social media is so public, it may make the process less shady. “You have the opportunity to have more transparency in the process and that makes it easier for regulators and the public to see what’s going on,” Rocco said.

Right now, inRecruit is focusing on growing their network. Jay Wright and Villanova signed on first, and the Penn Quakers got wind of the service and signed up as well. In addition, Rocco says high schools, junior colleges and programs from top to bottom of the NCAA structure are creating accounts every day. Kyle Lowry of the Toronto Raptors signed up, and Rocco says that ability to be effective across national borders is the next big thing his team hopes to tackle.

“Coaches have told us they’d love to see this available for places like Italy, Spain and Nigeria. That ability to go international is definitely important.”

The internet is a big place. Perhaps inRecruit will be basketball’s organized meeting place amongst the chaos.

Eric Angevine is the editor of Storming the Floor. He tweets @stfhoops.