Rob Dauster

LEXINGTON, KY - FEBRUARY 09:  Charles Matthews #4 of the Kentucky Wildcats dribbles the ball in the game against the Georgia Bulldogs at Rupp Arena on February 9, 2016 in Lexington, Kentucky.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Charles Matthews to transfer out of Kentucky

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Kentucky announced on Wednesday morning that Charles Matthews will be transferring out of the program.

“I want to thank the coaches, my teammates and the Big Blue Nation for all of their support this season,” Matthews said. “I gained great experience during my freshman year at Kentucky. This was a difficult decision for me, but at the end of the day I felt like it was in my best interest to explore other options. I appreciate the support Coach Cal has given me in making this decision and the commitment the coaching staff made to me for this past season and beyond. Kentucky will always hold a special place in my heart.”

Matthews was a top 100 recruit in the Class of 2015, but the 6-foot-5 wing averaged just 1.7 points in 10 minutes this past season. And with the like of De’Aaron Fox and Malik Monk joining the program next season — and Isaiah Briscoe potentially returning to school — the back court was looking more and more crowded.

“The hardest thing as a coach is to lose a player that you really want to coach,” Calipari said. “In Charles’ case, I believe he is going to be a productive college player who has the ability to play at the next level. I know Charles’ best basketball is ahead of him, and while I’m a saddened to see him go, I support his decision and will help in any way I can.

“It hasn’t happened very often in my career, but transferring is a part of our game. It doesn’t change who we are as a program. We will support every kid in whatever way we can to make sure they can pursue their dreams, because ultimately that’s all I want for these young men.”

Matthews is the fifth Calipari player to transfer out of the program: Darnell Dodson (Southern Miss), Stacey Poole (Georgia Tech), Kyle Wiltjer (Gonzaga) and Ryan Harrow (Georgia State).

Syracuse University replacing Carrier Dome’s inflatable roof

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SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) Syracuse University will replace the Carrier Dome’s inflatable roof with a permanent structure as part of a plan to renovate the 36-year-old stadium and another campus athletic facility.

University officials announced Monday that it will cost an estimated $105 million to replace the dome’s iconic “white pillows” with a roof built constructed with ETFE, a space-age transparent plastic that lets in light.

The stadium, opened in 1980, is home to Syracuse’s basketball, football and lacrosse programs. University officials say they hope to avoid moving any games while the new roof is constructed.

The university will also make improvement to Archbold Gymnasium, a 108-year-old building that houses recreational and workout facilities.

Officials say the upgrades will cost at least $255 million. A timeline for the project has yet to be finalized.

Kansas to headline CBE Classic in November in Kansas City

KANSAS CITY, MO - MARCH 13:  Head coach Bill Self of the Kansas Jayhawks coaches from the bench during the Big 12 Basketball Tournament quarterfinal game against the Oklahoma State Cowboys at Sprint Center on March 13, 2014 in Kansas City, Missouri.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
(Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) Kansas will headline the CBE Classic at Sprint Center in November, and will be joined by Georgia, UAB and NIT champion George Washington in the championship rounds of the tournament.

The Jayhawks return several key players from last season’s team, which spent much of the season ranked No. 1 in the nation. They also will welcome the nation’s top-rated recruit in Josh Jackson as they begin pursuit of a 13th straight Big 12 championship.

The championship rounds are Nov. 21-22. They wrap up a weekend of festivities that includes the induction of the latest class into the College Basketball Hall of Fame.

Among those who will be inducted are Dominique Wilkins, Doug Collins and Mike Montgomery.

Looking Forward: Who were the winners and the losers of the Coaching Carousel?

KANSAS CITY, MO - MARCH 11:  Texas Tech Red Raiders head coach Tubby Smith watches his team against the Texas Longhorns during the first round of the Big 12 basketball tournament at Sprint Center on March 11, 2015 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
(Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
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The NBA Draft’s Early Entry Deadline has come and gone. Just about every elite recruit has decided where they will be playing their college ball next season. The coaching carousel, which ended up spinning a bit faster than initially expected, has come to a close for all of the major programs. 

In other words, by now, we have a pretty good feel for what college basketball is going to look like during the 2016-17 season. With that in mind, let’s take a look at who were the winners, the losers and the people that couldn’t move the needle during this year’s Coaching Carousel.

THESE ARE YOUR BIG WINNERS

MEMPHIS: To me, Memphis was easily the biggest winner of this year’s coaching carousel, and it’s not just because they hired Tubby Smith, which was arguably the best hire of the spring. Tubby has coached at Tulsa, Georgia, Kentucky, Minnesota and Texas Tech, and the only place that he didn’t significantly exceed expectations during his tenure was at Kentucky, where he won a national title, reached three more Elite 8s and notched five SEC titles in ten seasons. I wrote a column on it at the time. He’ll make Memphis relevant again, and not just in the AAC standings.

But the other part of it is that the Tigers got Josh Pastner’s contract off the books. Pastner was guaranteed more than $10 million over the next four years, which is too much money to just walk away from and, given the relationship between the Tiger fanbase and their former head coach, too expensive for the University to afford. When donors tighten the pursestrings and fans stop showing up to the games, it’s tough to bring in revenue. Memphis wasn’t the only winner in that deal …

JOSH PASTNER: … because Pastner needed a reboot about as badly as Memphis needed him gone. He had lost the fanbase in Memphis. They didn’t support the team, they didn’t support him and if he was going to coach for the rest of his contract, his life in town was going to be almost as miserable as his teams would be. Instead, he was given more than $1 million to go away, and by “go away” I mean become the head coach of Georgia Tech. So he got paid to leave Memphis for a program in a better conference and in Atlanta, a city that he had pulled two McDonald’s All-Americans out of. Not a bad deal.

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     RELATED: Next year’s Breakout Stars

OKLAHOMA STATE: Like Memphis, Oklahoma State was dealing with a coach in Travis Ford that was losing games and, in the process, losing fans. What better way to invigorate a fan base than to hire a head coach that plays an entertaining style of basketball and just so happens to be coming off of a tournament run that saw him get No. 14 seed Stephen F. Austin to within a miracle tip-in of the Sweet 16 in a season that capped a three-year run with three NCAA touraments, an 89-14 overall record and a staggering 59-1 league record. That’s what the Pokes got in Brad Underwood, who has Big 12 pedigree having coaching under Bob Huggins and Frank Martin at Kansas State. (More on that in a bit.)

VCU: Just one year removed from #ShakaWatch finally ending, as Smart took over at Texas for Rick Barnes, the Rams once again have one of the best up-and-coming young head coaches in the business in Will Wade. After phenomenal season winning 25 games, an Atlantic 10 regular season title and a first round game in the NCAA tournament, Wade was a favorite to replace Kevin Stallings at Vanderbilt, in his hometown of Nashville, Tennessee. Instead, he re-upped on an eight-year deal with VCU.

TEXAS TECH AND CHRIS BEARD: This was a match made in heaven. Beard, who just five years ago wasn’t even in the Division I coaching ranks, took Arkansas-Little Rock to the second round of the NCAA tournament in his first season with the Trojans and parlayed that into the UNLV job (for a week) and then the Texas Tech job. The Red Raiders lost Tubby Smith, who led them back to the NCAA tournament, but landed a guy that A) spent 10 seasons in Lubbock as an assistant coach and B) actually wants to be at Texas Tech, which he has called his dream job.

VANDERBILT: The Commodores needed to part ways with Kevin Stallings after nearly two decades. They did. And they replaced him with Bryce Drew, who had won four Horizon League regular season titles in five years, getting to the NCAA tournament twice. He was one of the hottest mid-major coaching names in recent years. There’s not much more to say than that.

JAMIE DIXON: Dixon went to 11 NCAA tournaments in 13 seasons with Pitt after taking over for Ben Howland, but in the latter years of his coaching tenure, the Panthers had plateaued. Thanks, realignment. Anyway, Dixon and Pitt needed to go their separate ways, and Dixon ended up getting the gig at his alma mater, TCU, which is a better job than people realize. Great facilities, donors with deep pockets, a highly-regarded athletic director and a spot in the middle of the fertile recruiting grounds of Dallas.

New UNLV men's basketball coach Marvin Menzies smiles during a news conference after the UNLV board of regents approved his contract, Friday, April 22, 2016 in Las Vegas. The boards voted 12-1 on Friday to approve a five-year, $3.75 million deal for Menzies. (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP) LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT
Marvin Menzies (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP)

     RELATED: Looking Forward Big 12 | ACC | A-10 | Big East | Big Ten

AND THESE ARE YOUR LOSERS

DELAWARE: It’s mid-May, nearly two months after former head coach Monte’ Ross was fired. The Blue Hens have not only not hired a replacement yet, they only last week hired the new athletic director that will be hiring said replacement. In the meantime, the program is down to just four scholarship players after their top six scorers all transferred. Good luck finding someone to take that job.

UNLV: I actually think that UNLV made a pretty good hire with Marvin Menzies. He’s a member of the Rick Pitino coaching tree that had a lot of success at New Mexico State and will come relatively cheap for a program that is more or less broke.

The problem is that their coaching search was embarrassingly public. It started with rumors that Rick Pitino was going to leave Louisville for Vegas. That didn’t happen. Then Mick Cronin deftly used the Rebels as leverage to get an extension out of Cincinnati. Chris Beard eventually took the job, but after it took more than a week for the Board of Regents to actually approve his contract, Beard ended up leaving for Texas Tech a week later. And all of that happened in a year where UNLV fired Dave Rice in January, roughly eight months after they extended him instead of looking for a replacement. And do you know who they could have hired last spring? Ben Howland.

There’s no way around it: UNLV’s search was an absolute embarrassment. It’s no wonder Menzies took over a team with just two scholarship players.

KANSAS STATE: I’m not saying that Bruce Weber deserved to be fired. He’s been to two tournament in four seasons in Manhattan. But he’s also 32-33 overall and 13-23 in the Big 12 the last two seasons. So there’s justification for a coaching change, especially when you consider that this was the year where Brad Underwood would be leaving Stephen F. Austin. Underwood is a Kansas State alum who spent six seasons as an assistant with Bobby Huggins and Frank Martin and won 89 games the last three seasons. He had all the makings of the man that would spark the resurgence of the Kansas State program.

Instead, Underwood went to Oklahoma State, a Big 12 rival. Weber is probably coaching for his job next season.

STEVE PIKIELL: I actually think Steve Pikiell is a really good coach. It took a few years, but he built Stony Brook into a mid-major powerhouse out of basically nothing. With so many key pieces graduating this year, it was his time to move on, so he took over at … Rutgers. The Scarlet Knights haven’t had a winning season since 2006 (shoutout to Quincy Douby), they haven’t been to the NCAA tournament since 1991 and, since their last tournament trip, they’ve finished with a .500 record in league play just twice. Never better than .500, and never better than fifth in their league standings.

And now they’re in the Big Ten, meaning that a team in a region where no one cares about college sports will be playing “local” rivals like Michigan State, Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio State, Michigan, Purdue and Maryland. Good luck, Steve.

THESE HIRES? WELL … WHATEVER

STANFORD: On the one hand, the Cardinal made a needed change getting rid of Johnny Dawkins. That’s probably a good thing (more on that in a second). And they hired a guy in Jerod Haase who is from California and is a part of the North Carolina coaching tree. He spent four seasons at UAB, reaching the second round of the NCAA tournament with an upset win over No. 3 seed Iowa State in 2015 and winning the CUSA regular season title in 2016. It’s not a bad hire, but it’s hard to get overly excited about a guy that finished better than fourth place in a league like CUSA just once.

CENTRAL FLORIDA: UCF landed Johnny Dawkins, a member of Coach K’s coaching tree, after they fired Donnie Jones. But he’s also a guy that was run out of town by Stanford after eight disappointing seasons, one trip to the NCAA tournament and a pair of NIT titles. Just how invigorated can a fan base be by hiring someone else’s cast off?

PITTSBURGH: The same can be asked of Pitt. They got rid of Jamie Dixon, whose success with the Panthers had plateaued, for Kevin Stallings, who was pushed out the door by Vanderbilt because … his career had plateaued.

There’s also the issue of expectations here. Stallings has a very well-respected coach among the peers in his profession. Maybe he just needs to start over at a new school, but when Pitt fans are expecting Pitt natives Sean and Archie Miller to want to come home — and when local reporters are breaking “news” that it’s going to happen — anything less is going to be seen as a disappointment.

GEORGIA TECH: The Yellow Jackets ran into the exact same issue Pitt did. They fired Brian Gregory and landed Josh Pastner, who was no longer wanted at Memphis, when everyone was expecting athletic director Mike Bobinski to make a splash. He used to be the Xavier athletic director. You know who coaches at Xavier? Chris Mack! You know who else used to coach at Xavier? Sean Miller! You know who Sean Miller’s little brother is? Archie Miller!

There were all these connections, except none of them had any chance to happen. So while it feels like Georgia Tech got stuck with Pastner, in reality they picked a 38-year old that had been to four NCAA tournaments in his first five seasons as a head coach over Pat Kelsey, a former Xavier assistant that has yet to take Winthrop to a single postseason event in four seasons.

Rick Pitino expects Chinanu Onuaku to go to the NBA

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Louisville center Chinanu Onuaku is undergoing a surgical procedure on his heart, according to the Louisville Courier-Journal, which sounds like a much bigger deal than it appears to be.

He’s not even going to be out for a week.

What’s more telling from that story, however, is that head coach Rick Pitino fully expects Onuaku to remain in the draft. Here’s the money quote:

“There are certain players who waffle and come back because they’re not sure,” Pitino said. “(Onuaku’s) desire has been to go forth 100 percent and try and go to the league this year. That’s been his family’s and his mindset. I’m behind it 100 percent, and our staff is, too.”

“From the day he left school (to begin preparing for the combine), I’d resigned myself saying he was going. Everything I’ve been planning is that he’s staying in the draft.”

Many have expected Onuaku to head to the professional ranks this season, and this seems to all-but confirm that fact. Onuaku is a borderline first round pick, and while it would significantly help Louisville if he opted to return to school, that does not appear to be in the cards.

The Cards will have to make do with the likes of Mangok Mathiang, Anas Mahmoud, Matz Stockman and Jaylen Johnson next season.

Syracuse guard Malachi Richardson to sign with agent, remain in draft

Syracuse's Malachi Richardson (23) drives past Virginia's Anthony Gill (13) during the second half of a college basketball game in the regional finals of the NCAA Tournament, Sunday, March 27, 2016, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
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Syracuse guard Malachi Richardson will sign with an agent and stay in the NBA Draft, telling ESPN that it was a family decision and that “doing what was best for me was the most important thing.”

Richardson’s decision was one of the most intriguing after the NBA Draft Combine. A 6-foot-6 wing, Richardson entered college with the reputation for being a shooter and, despite averaging 13.4 points this season, posted one of the more inefficient seasons we’ve seen out of a freshman shooter in years. He shot just 35.3 percent from three and 38.8 percent from inside the arc — an utterly abysmal number — while his offensive rating, according to KenPom.com, was 100.2; for comparison’s sake, Buddy Hield’s offensive rating was 121.5 and Jamal Murray’s was 118.0. Anything below 100 is generally considered terrible.

But there were a couple of factors at play here. For starters, Richardson has the length and athleticism to potentially be an above average perimeter defender in the NBA one day. The other aspect of it is this: There are scouts that believe Richardson’s struggles offensively had much more to do with his shot selection than they did with his ability to shoot. “Great stroke,” said one member of the front office of a playoff team. “I think he’s going to be a pretty good shooter.”

In the NBA, he’s going to be a catch-and-shoot guy, particularly early in his career, and he has the tools to one day be really good in that role. In a draft like this, that’s enough to get you picked in the first round.

For the Orange, this is a serious blow. Richardson was a potential all-ACC player next season, and while they caught a break getting Tyler Lydon back, the Orange will now be without the guy that should have been their leading scorer and best perimeter shooter.