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Chris Holtmann
(AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

Butler basketball coach agrees to contract extension

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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Butler coach Chris Holtmann has agreed to a contract extension that will keep him with the Bulldogs through 2021-22.

The announcement came Wednesday but terms were not disclosed.

Holtmann is 45-22 since replacing Brandon Miller, initially on an interim basis in the fall of 2014. Holtmann joined former coach Brad Stevens as the only coaches in Butler history to reach the NCAA Tournament in each of their first two seasons.

Last season, Butler went 22-11, finished fourth in the Big East and reached the second round of the NCAA tourney. The Bulldogs are losing their top two players, Kellen Dunham and Roosevelt Jones, to graduation.

But Holtmann is bringing in the highest-rated recruiting class in school history.

Illinois’ Nunn pleads guilty to misdemeanor, gets probation

Illinois guard Kendrick Nunn (25) tries to go up for a basket against Indiana center Thomas Bryant (31) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game at in Champaign, Ill., on Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Heather Coit)
(AP Photo/Heather Coit)
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URBANA, Ill. (AP) Illinois basketball player Kendrick Nunn has pleaded guilty to misdemeanor battery in a deal that eventually could see his record cleared.

Champaign County State’s Attorney Julia Rietz said the 20-year-old Nunn pleaded guilty Wednesday. He was initially charged with two counts of domestic battery after being accused in March of striking a woman during a domestic dispute.

Rietz said Nunn was sentenced to 18 months of unsupervised probation and 100 hours of community service. If he completes those terms the misdemeanor will be removed from his record.

Rietz said the deal made sense because Nunn took responsibility for his actions and had no prior record. The victim approved of the arrangement.

Nunn is a sophomore guard. He was suspended from the basketball team but remains in school.

Menzies adds 3 more to UNLV recruiting class

New UNLV men's basketball coach Marvin Menzies smiles during a news conference after the UNLV board of regents  approved his contract, Friday, April 22, 2016  in Las Vegas. The boards voted 12-1 on Friday to approve a five-year, $3.75 million deal for Menzies.  (L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP) LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT
L.E. Baskow/Las Vegas Sun via AP
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LAS VEGAS (AP) Marvin Menzies has added three more players to his first recruiting class at UNLV.

Transfers Uche Ofoegbu (OO-chay oh-FAY-boo) and Jordan Johnson signed financial aid agreements on Wednesday, and Djordjije Slijivancanin (GEORGE-ee slee-VAUNCH-en-in) signed a national letter of intent to play for the Runnin’ Rebels.

Ofoegbu, a 6-foot-4 guard, is a graduate transfer from San Francisco and will be eligible to play right away. He averaged 9.2 points and shot 50 percent last season.

Johnson, a 5-9 guard, will have to sit out the 2016-17 season after transferring from Milwaukee, where he averaged 12.5 points and 8.1 assists per game.

Slijivancanin, a 6-10 forward from Serbia, spent part of the last year at IMG Academy in Florida. UNLV also signed Zion Morgan, a guard from Chicago, on Tuesday.

Nevada lands transfers Cooke, Stephens

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Nevada head coach Eric Musselman made two more additions to his roster today as Purdue transfer Kendall Stephens and Iowa State transfer Hallice Cooke both committed to the Wolf Pack.

Stephens was supposed to be one of the best shooters on Purdue’s roster this season, but he missed some time in the middle of the season due to the death of a friend and never found his way back into the rotation. He averaged a career-low 6.2 points and shot just 31 percent from three, also a career-low. He’ll sit out the 2016-17 season and have one year of eligibility remaining.

Cooke spent last season at Iowa State after redshirting a year following a transfer from Oregon State. As a freshman with the Beavers, Cooke averaged 8.2 points and shot 45.6 percent from three. Last season with the Cyclones, he managed just over 10 minutes per game.

Like Stephens, Cooke has to sit a year and will have one season of eligibility remaining.

Looking Forward: Which coaches will enter 2016-17 on the Hot Seat?

Minnesota coach Richard Pitino reacts as he talks to his players during a timeout in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Rutgers in the first round of the Big Ten Conference tournament, Wednesday, March 11, 2015, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
(AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
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The NBA Draft’s Early Entry Deadline has come and gone. Just about every elite recruit has decided where they will be playing their college ball next season. The coaching carousel, which ended up spinning a bit faster than initially expected, has come to a close for all of the major programs. 

In other words, by now, we have a pretty good feel for what college basketball is going to look like during the 2016-17 season. With that in mind, let’s take a look at who could spark the Coaching Carousel next season.

Richard Pitino, Minnesota: Pitino has the hottest seat in the country at the high-major level, and it’s not just because of what’s happened on the court. The issue is off the floor, where the Gophers just cannot figure out a way to stay out of trouble. In the last three months alone, a player has been arrested over a sexual assault allegation and three players were suspended after a sex tape was tweeted by Kevin Dorsey. Players have been dismissed for violating team rules and, 18 months ago, a player named Daquien McNeil was kicked out of the program after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend. Should I mention that Pitino went $175,000 over budget on private jets as well?

But that’s not it. Pitino went 25-13 his first season and won the NIT, but has since followed that up with 18 wins and, last year, an 8-23 finish and a 2-16 record in the Big Ten. The Gophers have no where to go but up next season, but how big of a leap will Pitino have to make for the new Athletic Director to overlook his team’s transgressions. The good news? That $5.7 million buyout won’t be easy to raise money for.

Steve Alford, UCLA: Pitino was the easiest name to put on this list. Alford is the most intriguing name here. It’s no secret that UCLA fans are not happy with their head coach or the way the program is heading. Whether it’s Daddy Ball or disappointing regular seasons or whatever, the Bruin faithful have been clamoring for a change. There have been multiple instances of UCLA fans paying for planes with “Fire Alford” banners to fly over UCLA’s campus. Alford returned a one-year extension he received to try and appease the fan base. And all this is happening when the Bruins are bringing in a loaded recruiting class headlined by a freshman named Lonzo Ball, who is a potential top ten pick and, depending on how the season plays out, a candidate for All-America this season.

The Bruins have the potential to win the Pac-12 next season. They also have the potential to totally implode. Pauley Pavilion certainly won’t be short on drama or story lines this season.

     RELATED: Eight programs on the rise | And seven on the decline

UCLA head coach Steve Alford, second from right, watches action against Cal Poly with his assistant coaches in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Los Angeles, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Michael Baker)
UCLA head coach Steve Alford (AP Photo/Michael Baker)

     RELATED: Next year’s Breakout Stars | Winners, Losers of Coaching Carousel

Kim Anderson, Missouri: In hindsight, hiring a 60-year old that had spent the last 12 seasons in the Division II ranks probably wasn’t the best move for Missouri as they tried to find their footing in the SEC. Since Anderson took over, he’s gone 19-44 and won six SEC games in two seasons where the Tigers have finished in 14th in the league. Of the 12 players that were signed in the 2013 and 2014 recruiting classes — kids that should be juniors and seniors next season — 11 transferred out of the program or were dismissed. Keanau Post, a JuCo transfer that graduated last spring, is the only one that left in good standing.

Bruce Weber, Kansas State: We touched on this yesterday, but if Weber didn’t lose the fan base with a losing record the past two seasons, including a 13-23 mark in the Big 12, he probably did when the Wildcats faithful had to watch an alum and a former assistant in Brad Underwood take a job with league rival Oklahoma State.

John Groce, Illinois: Groce entered the 2015-16 season on the hot season. He had won an average of just over 20 games in three seasons, reaching one NCAA tournament and amassing a record of 24-30 in the Big Ten. Last year was a big year for him, and the Illini went 15-19 with a 5-13 Big Ten record, only finishing ahead of train wrecks Rutgers and Minnesota. But Illinois’ roster was obliterated by injury last year, and that earned Groce a stay of execution. Can he turn things around in 2016-17?

Jim Christian, Boston College: This will be Christian’s third season in Chestnut Hill, and his tenure with the Eagles has not really been all that impressive. That’s putting it mildly. He won 13 games and went 4-14 in the ACC in his first season with the Eagles and followed that up with a 7-25 season where BC went winless in league play, a year so bad that senior Dennis Clifford told reporters that his best memory as a college basketball player was “going out to eat“. Christian also loses two of his top three scorers to graduation. He does returns Jerome Robinson, who will be an all-ACC player down the road, and he had nine freshmen on the roster last season, which may be enough to earn him another season.

Johnny Jones, LSU: Jones failed to reach the NCAA tournament in a season where he had the No. 1 pick on his roster, flanked by enough talent to arguably make them the best team, on paper, in the SEC. That’s a bad look, one that could have justifiably cost him his job after this past season. If Jones isn’t able to turn things around this year, they may be looking for a new basketball coach in Baton Rouge.

     RELATED: Looking Forward Big 12 | ACC | A-10 | Big East | Big Ten

Mike Anderson, Arkansas: Anderson won 27 games in 2014-15, reaching the second round of the NCAA tournament on the backs of Bobby Portis and Michael Qualls. But those two both bounced for the NBA, and Anderson won just 16 games last year. He did get some good news with Moses Kingsley returning to school, and it’s hard to fire someone that has spent a total of 23 years at the program, but at some point, winning has to be a priority. He’s been to one tournament in five years.

Brad Brownell, Clemson: Brownell is entering his seventh season with the Tigers, and is now six years removed from his only trip to the NCAA tournament. He’s never won more than 10 ACC games and has lost at least 12 games every season.

Mark Fox, Georgia: Fox has been with the Bulldogs for seven seasons, reaching two NCAA tournaments and two NITS in that span. He’s won 20 games each of the last three seasons, meaning Georgia has been good, just never really relevant beyond a fight for a spot on the right side of the bubble each February. Is that enough to keep his job at a school where basketball is the fourth-most important sport behind football, football and football?

Tim Miles, Nebraska: Miles was able to turn around the first two Division I programs that he coached at, making North Dakota State one of the better mid-major programs in the country before taking Colorado State from seven wins his first season to the NCAA tournament five years later. He looked like he was on the same path with the Cornhuskers, winning 19 games and getting an at-large bid his second year in Lincoln. But things have stagnated, as Nebraska was under .500 and went just 11-25 in the Big Ten the last two seasons.

Charles Matthews to transfer out of Kentucky

LEXINGTON, KY - FEBRUARY 09:  Charles Matthews #4 of the Kentucky Wildcats dribbles the ball in the game against the Georgia Bulldogs at Rupp Arena on February 9, 2016 in Lexington, Kentucky.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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Kentucky announced on Wednesday morning that Charles Matthews will be transferring out of the program.

“I want to thank the coaches, my teammates and the Big Blue Nation for all of their support this season,” Matthews said. “I gained great experience during my freshman year at Kentucky. This was a difficult decision for me, but at the end of the day I felt like it was in my best interest to explore other options. I appreciate the support Coach Cal has given me in making this decision and the commitment the coaching staff made to me for this past season and beyond. Kentucky will always hold a special place in my heart.”

Matthews was a top 100 recruit in the Class of 2015, but the 6-foot-5 wing averaged just 1.7 points in 10 minutes this past season. And with the like of De’Aaron Fox and Malik Monk joining the program next season — and Isaiah Briscoe potentially returning to school — the back court was looking more and more crowded.

“The hardest thing as a coach is to lose a player that you really want to coach,” Calipari said. “In Charles’ case, I believe he is going to be a productive college player who has the ability to play at the next level. I know Charles’ best basketball is ahead of him, and while I’m a saddened to see him go, I support his decision and will help in any way I can.

“It hasn’t happened very often in my career, but transferring is a part of our game. It doesn’t change who we are as a program. We will support every kid in whatever way we can to make sure they can pursue their dreams, because ultimately that’s all I want for these young men.”

Matthews is the fifth Calipari player to transfer out of the program: Darnell Dodson (Southern Miss), Stacey Poole (Georgia Tech), Kyle Wiltjer (Gonzaga) and Ryan Harrow (Georgia State).